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Summer & Fall 2012 Course Offerings

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Fall 2012 First-Year Experience Courses

Tracking Sheets and Other Information

Courses for previous semesters can be found at:

Spring 2012    Summer/Fall 2011    Spring 2011     Summer/Fall 2010    Spring 2010    Summer/Fall 2009

Substitution Opportunities for Upper-Level Honors Credit

(Six hours only of substitutions permitted per student)

STUDY ABROAD WAIVER

The Honors College believes strongly in the formative power of studying abroad.  Therefore, the Honors College offers a waiver of 3 hours of upper-level Honors course credits through the successful completion of a Study Abroad Waiver in conjunction with a study abroad program.  Through this process, students may earn a waiver for up to 3 hours of Honors non-seminar credit for a summer session, fall or spring semester abroad. Students who study for two semesters abroad (full summer, fall or spring) may earn a waiver for up to 6 hours of Honors non-seminar credit. Honors seminars may not be waived.  Studying abroad is a type of experiential learning which is most meaningful when accompanied by organized reflection.  The purpose of the Study Abroad Waiver is to provide opportunity for this reflection.  There are two components to the Study Abroad Waiver: an online journal and an academic reflective essay connecting student experiences abroad to a prescribed book read before leaving.  Students are not allowed to complete a Study Abroad Waiver to earn Honors credit during their final semester before graduation.  Contact Thomas Reynolds at 742-1828 for more information.

HONORS COURSE CONTRACT

Honors Contracting allows an Honors student to receive Honors credit for a non-Honors course by completing work above and beyond what is required of students in the course.  Only 3000 and 4000-level courses that meet face-to-face are eligible to be contracted. Graduate courses and cross-listed courses may also be taken for Honors credit. Contracting is not permitted during a student’s final semester before graduation.  See Donna Srader at the Honors College (742-1828) for more information and for an application to contract a course.

SUMMER I 2012

 

EVHM 4350-H01    EVHM Capstone Experience:        (CRN #33443)         Prof. K. Caswell      TBA

                             Leadership and Landscape       SEMINAR

Note: There is a special course fee, which will be uploaded soon.

Course dates: May 16-31, 2012 (Intersession)

Prerequisite: Instructor approval is required; email Professor Caswell at Kurt.Caswell@ttu.edu.

The outdoors is our classroom in this field experience course. Students will spend two-weeks traveling in canoes on a Montana river, while honing skills in leadership and group dynamics, creative writing, critical reading, and primitive camping. Students will take on leadership roles, and be offered peer feedback on judgment and decision making. In addition, we’ll attend to experiences in solitude and in community in nature, and make a point of exploring the flora, fauna, geology, weathers, archaeology, and history of the river canyon.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF HONORS SEMINAR CREDIT FOR NON-EVHM MAJORS AND MINORS.

FULL

HONS 3304-H01   Bones, Botanicals, and Birds        (CRN #20063)         Prof. S. Tomlinson      MTWRF 9:00-10:50 AM

SEMINAR

John James Audubon used to wander the countryside for weeks on end, looking for new birds to paint. This is common knowledge, but did you know that when he found the birds he wanted, he shot them and used wire armatures to pose their lifeless bodies into incredibly dynamic scenes—and changed the face of natural history illustration forever. Well, we won’t be doing any of that in this course (either wandering around shooting birds or changing the face of illustration forever), but we will be learning to illustrate the natural world. We may even hear more ―inside stories about Audubon and other natural history illustrators in the process. This course is an introduction to basic nature and science illustration techniques, ranging from initial sketches in the field and lab to final product in the studio. Students are expected to draw and paint, but do not need artistic ―talen‖ to benefit from—or enjoy—this course. If you have an interest in drawing, nature, or both, this is definitely the course for you. And if you have always thought you could not draw a stick, let alone a bone, beetle, or bird, then this is also the course for you! Prepare to be surprised at what you can do. Required field trips.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 3301-H01   Paris        (CRN #30473)         Prof. J. Brink

SEMINAR

***STUDY ABROAD

 

HONS 3304-H02   Paris        (CRN #33904)         Prof. D. Nathan

SEMINAR

***STUDY ABROAD

SUMMER II 2012

CANCELLED

COMS 2300-H01    Public Speaking        (CRN #64144)         TBA      MTWRF 10:00-11:50 AM

Jerry Seinfeld once stated that “According to most studies, people's number one fear is public speaking. Number two is death. Death  is number two. Does that sound right? This means to the average person, if you go to a funeral, you're better off in the casket than doing the eulogy.” Come learn how to master the art of public speaking! Communication is more than just getting a message from point A to point B; true communication happens on a deeper level to create more positive results.  Join us as we discover ways to communicate more effectively personally and professionally. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM ORAL COMMUNICATIONS REQUIREMENT.

FALL 2012

FULL

ACCT 2300-H01    Financial Accounting        (CRN #20419)         Prof. L. Quepha      MWF 1:00-1:50 PM

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA, Sophomore standing, and a C or better in any college-level mathematics course.

This course is the first course in the accounting sequence, and introduces students to all aspects of external financial reporting.  Content includes a basic introduction to the preparation of financial statements and the study of annual reports. Course includes discussion of current topics in financial reporting and research on financial statements of companies listed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

ANSC 3401-H01     Reproductive Physiology            (CRN #10532)          Prof. S. Prien           MW 6:00-7:20 PM

ANSC 3401-H50     Non-Credit Lab                              (CRN #10541)          Prof. S. Prien               W 1:00-2:20 PM

ANSC 3401-H70     Discussion                                        (CRN #10548)          Prof. S. Prien               R 5:00-5:50 PM

Prerequisite: ANSC 2202 and 2306 or ANSC 3405.

Corequisite: ANSC 3401-H50 Lab and ANSC 3401-H70 Discussion

This course will provide students with an opportunity for an in-depth study of the reproductive process as it occurs in farm animals. This course differs from the regular section and will target highly motivated students with a unique integrated intellectual experience. As such, the fundamental aspects of reproductive physiology and management will be presented using a more interactive and personalized approach. Topics covered in the course include male and female reproductive anatomy, endocrine glands, sex determination, cloning, artificial insemination, and embryo transfer.

 

ASTR 1401-H01     Stellar Astronomy          (CRN #29544)       Prof. M. Clark            MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

ASTR 1401-H51     Non-Credit Lab               (CRN #29545)                 Staff                       W 4:00-5:50 PM

ASTR 1401-751     Non-Credit Discussion               (CRN #30004)                 Staff                       TBA

If you have to take a natural science course (which you do), wouldn't you like to take one that mixes aspects of the entire universe into a single course?  Learn things about who we are and why we are here and how we know so much about something so vast.  The best part is that this course is designed to allow you to explore astronomy yourself by taking your own data and analyzing it and then incorporating it into things that we discuss.  You won't have to take my word for it: you will be able to discover the universe for yourself.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

ATMO 1300-H01     Intro. to Atmospheric Science    (CRN #24738)       Prof. D. Haragan    TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Note: Due to some duplication of content, students who have taken Honors Integrated Science with an Atmospheric Science component are not eligible for this class.

Corequisite:  Any section of ATMO 1100 Lab

A descriptive treatment of the science of the atmosphere in its modern dress.  Since all activity in the atmosphere is a response to solar energy, the course will begin with an introduction to radiation, atmospheric composition and the resulting heat balance of the earth-atmosphere system. This will be followed by consideration of the forces that control the state of the atmosphere and atmospheric motion.  Finally, the focus will shift to a discussion of contemporary issues related to atmospheric science such as global warming, environmental pollution, climate change, severe storms and weather modification. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

BIOL 1403-H01     Biology I                                (CRN #13607)                 Prof. M. Dini                  MW 2:00-3:20 PM

BIOL 1403-H51     Non-Credit Lab                   (CRN #13614)                 Staff                               R 2:00-4:50 PM 

                                                                                                                                                  Exams T 6:00-7:30 PM   

Note: Enrollment in this course is restricted to Honors students.

Prerequisite: 1) One year of HS Biology; AND 2) Freshmen must meet one of the following criteria: SAT of 1100, ACT of 27, or AP Biology score of 3. Instructor strongly recommends taking CHEM 1307 first.

Corequisite: BIOL 1403-H51 Lab section.

Honors Biology I is designed especially with the sophomore life sciences major in mind.  This course helps students build a strong foundation in cell biology, biochemistry, genetics (both molecular and classical), reproductive and developmental biology and evolutionary biology.  Along with helping students construct a knowledge base in biology, the course will also challenge students to think about problems as biologists think about them.  Rather than listening to lectures, students in this course will do their basic research/reading outside of class, whereas class time will be used to refine and clarify understanding, often in the context of small groups.  Students in this course are expected to take a very active and responsible role in their education as biologists.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

CHEM 1307-H01   Principles of Chemistry I           (CRN #14787)             Prof. D. Casadonte     TR 9:30-10:50 AM

CHEM 1307-701    Required Review Session          (CRN #24719)             Prof. D. Casadonte     M 5:00-6:30 PM

CHEM 1307-702    Required Review Session          (CRN #24730)             Prof. D. Casadonte     T 5:00-6:30 PM

Note: Exams will be held on Wednesday evenings from 7:00-9:00pm. Enrollment in this course is restricted to Honors students.

Prerequisite: At least one year of HS Chemistry, a grade of A in CHEM 1301 OR a passing score on the Chemistry Placement Exam AND a score of 600/26 or better on the Math portion of the SAT/ACT.  This course is open only to Honors students.

Corequisite: any CHEM 1107 Lab section.

This course focuses on a study of the fundamental concepts of chemistry including nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, molecular structure and geometry, bonding concepts and paradigms, thermochemistry, states of matter, the physical characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases, phase transitions, and an introduction to solution properties. This course has a limited enrollment, and as such provides opportunities for direct faculty-student interaction, small group discussion, and hands-on and inquiry-based learning. This course is recommended for students who plan careers in chemistry or in the physical and biological sciences, as well as in medicine or engineering.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

CHEM 3305-H01   Organic Chemistry I            (CRN #14791)        Prof. M. Findlater          MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

                                                                                                                                   Exams R 7:00-9:00 PM

Note: Enrollment in this course is restricted to Honors students.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, CHEM 1107, CHEM 1308 and CHEM 1108 with a grade of B- or better.

Corequisite: CHEM 3105 strongly recommended.

Organic chemistry, the chemistry of carbon compounds, underlies almost all the stuff of modern life, including combustion, biochemistry, food, pharmaceuticals, and plastics. The first semester course begins with the language of organic chemistry, the symbols and concepts that we use to describe, understand and predict the structure and bonding of organic molecules. We then discuss some of the fundamental reactions of organic molecules. The emphasis is on understanding simple reactions so they can be applied to more complex systems. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

COMS 3358-H01    Business and Professional           (CRN #27811)          Prof. D. Roach        TR 8:00-9:20 AM

                                    Communication

This course is designed to introduce you to basic skills, principles, and contexts of communication in business and professional settings. Verbal and nonverbal elements of oral communication are emphasized. Practice is provided in skills and principles associated with presentations, interviews, and meetings. The course fulfills the Oral Communication component of the University's General Education requirements. The course is based on research evidence and business trends indicating that in addition to fundamental effectiveness in communication skills, quality presentation-making is one of the most prevalent and important job tasks in careers today. In light of this, presentation assignments in the course stress basic skills of idea generation, message development, and message delivery.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM ORAL COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENT. 

 

ECE 3301-H01    General Electrical Engineering    (CRN #29870)      Prof. M. Maqusi    MWF 1:00-1:50 PM

SEMINAR

Prerequisite: MATH 1452.

This course is for non-majors and covers AC and DC analysis of electric circuits via exposition to voltage and current concepts by way of illustrating applications of mesh and nodal analysis methods, applied to RC, RL and RLC circuits. The course also introduces compunctions of real and reactive powers as well as energy computations. In addition, the course reviews circuit configurations such as the delta and y forms, and the application of Norton and Thevenin equivalents, as well as source transformations, and the introduction of sinusoidal and transient analyses. Via RC and RL circuits, basic filters will be introduced. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

ENGL 2307-H01    Introduction to Fiction: The Great    (CRN #14820)      Prof. J. Shelton    TR 2:00-3:20 PM

                                    War in Fiction

Note: Bachelor of Science students may fulfill both core curriculum Humanities credit and Sophomore Literature credit with this course.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302

This course will examine the Great War (1914-1918) in fictional representation, including fictionalized memoirs.  The first war to be fought with modern weapons, but one in which 19th century tactics were used, the Great War continues to live in European imagination as the determinative event of the 20th century.  By looking at fictional texts about this historical event, we will consider how writers have used and altered conventions of fiction in order to enable their representations of the war.  In order to contextualize fictional practices, we will read a bit of war poetry, some historical documents, critical essays, and quasi-fictional texts.  The preliminary reading list includes All Quiet on the Western Front, Regeneration, Mrs. Dalloway, and Undertones of War.

FULL

EVHM 2302-H01    The Literature of Place           (CRN #28345)                 Prof. S. Tomlinson         T 2:00-4:50 PM

                            (Formerly Landscapes)                   SEMINAR

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

What is a landscape? How do landscapes shape us, and how do we shape them? This course explores these questions by looking at the many different landscapes around us (neighborhoods, gardens, coffeehouses, food, cemeteries…) and their meanings through reading, discussion, writing, and art. Students will also study and think about landscapes through painting and drawing, and create landscape journals using book- and journal-making techniques. Students do not need artistic “talent” to benefit from this course, only a willingness to explore and work hard. Required field trips around Lubbock. Students must have access to a bicycle. Though there is some drawing and painting in this class, this course is reading, writing, and discussion intensive. Field trips! Bicycles! Local food! How could you go wrong? THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

EVHM 3300-H01       Writing for Publication       (CRN #28346)     Prof. K. Caswell             TR 12:30-1:50 PM

SEMINAR

A writing workshop in creative nonfiction focused on the relationship between people and nature. Students will practice a variety of structural and stylistic approaches with an eye toward developing their personal voice. Research – scientific, philosophical, cultural, theological – will be a major part of the writing process. Students will also learn how to submit their writing for publication. A final student reading will be open to the public.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

EVHM 3305-H01       Ecology                          (CRN# 28347)                 Prof. M. McGinley         MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: This course provides 3 hours of Biology elective credit for Biology majors, but will not substitute for credit toward the Biology core courses.  This course is different than BIOL 3309.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the field of ecology for students in EVHM.  This course will examine ecology of individuals, populations, and communities and introduce you to the techniques that ecologists use to develop hypotheses (including mathematical modeling) and test their hypotheses in the lab and the field. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HIST 1300-H01      Western Civilization I        (CRN# 29444)            Prof. J. Brink              TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

This is a survey of Western Civilization from prehistory to the Age of Louis XIV. It covers an ambitious span of time. The intellectual goal for this course is equally ambitious. In addition to understanding the place of history in the humanities, our purpose is to “know ourselves.” We shall examine the roots and development of western institutions, religions, economies, and cultures. We want to know the “who, what, when, where, how and why” of our mutual heritage. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES REQUIREMENT.

 

HIST 2300-H02      History of the US To 1877           (CRN# 14855)       Prof. D. Wiggins            MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

This course will introduce students to the major problems and themes in U.S. History from 1492 to Reconstruction.  We will look closely at the founding documents and primary sources of information, with emphasis on important figures. There will be an assortment of readings, papers, discussions and tests throughout the semester. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM U.S. HISTORY REQUIREMENT.  

 

HIST 4375-H01    Social & Cultural History of Europe,      (CRN #29757)   Prof. D. Wiggins     MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

                             1800 to the Present                                  SEMINAR                   

The course description includes the topics of modernization, industrialization, urbanization, gender, household, new professions, old occupations and labor unrest, along with aspects of bourgeois and working class culture, avant-garde and masses, war, genocide and Europe today, in the framework of the time  period of 1800 to the present!   This is a lot to explore.  Students will be able to pursue their own interests within this class structure. This is a writing intensive course, and the requirements of the course include several book reviews and a 12-page research paper.  Students will be able to present the results of their research to the class. 

FULL

HONS 1302-H02    Seminar in Healthcare            (CRN #20086)                 Prof. K. Dickson             T 4:00-6:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: Preference will be given to Honors freshmen and sophomores. Upperclassmen will be placed on a waitlist until mid-July, when available spots will be opened up. Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

The Honors College Seminar in Healthcare introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of healthcare professionals in the disciplines of medicine, nursing, allied health sciences, pharmacy, and research.  Healthcare professionals will provide personal and professional insight into the roles and responsibilities of the different disciplines, current healthcare issues, technologies, ethics, and the requirements and expectations of students applying for admission into healthcare fields of study.  Students will have the unique opportunity to meet faculty and professionals in practice.  Highlights of the class will include tours of Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center’s (TTUHSC) gross anatomy lab, the TTUHSC diagnostic laboratories, the Garrison Center, the SimLife Center and the Student Synergistic Center, as well as attendance at the TTUHSC Community Medical School.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE REQUIREMENT AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 1304-H01    Zombie Culture: The Zombie        (CRN #14920)            Prof. R. Weiner             M 6:00-8:50 PM

                           in History, Film, Literature, Sequential                   SEMINAR                  

                              Art and the Popular Imagination

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

Like Frankenstein’s monster and the vampire, the zombie is firmly placed within modern popular culture. Zombies have become a metaphor for our post 9/11 anxiety in a world of filled with chaos. The zombie is the ultimate nightmare preying on our fears in a society where the concept of safety is often illusory. This course will examine the zombie in all its various forms with a focus on film, literature, sequential art, and video games. We will look at the zombies’ historical role in Haitian history and how zombies have evolved over time in film, literature, and sequential art as an icon of popular culture.   This course will try to answer the question why do zombies continue to be popular? The recent AMC television series The Walking Dead has become a runaway hit with audiences and the forthcoming film World War Z is highly anticipated. Zombie films, literature, video games, comics, action figures, and artistic works have permeated our culture to such an extent that one might say zombies are now mainstream. The scholarly study of zombies has exploded in the last decade and this course will evaluate some of that work as well. Please note this course will be reading/writing intensive and contain mature content. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS REQUIREMENT AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 1304-H03     Analyzing Popular Music:     (CRN 25700)    Dr. Thomas Cimarusti     TR 2:00-3:20 PM

                                 Theory and Practice                   SEMINAR                  

Music  . . . . rap, rock, hip-hop, metal, jazz? Have you always wanted to understand how the music that YOU listen to works? Can you articulate in musical terms why your favorite popular song/artist resonates with you, your beliefs, your values? And how do popular music composers construct their music in order to heighten the meaning of their message? This course will begin with an introduction to music theory, providing students not only the ability to read and write music, but to understand the varied approaches to musical composition and their meaning in contemporary pop music. The second half of the course will focus on the analysis of both assigned popular songs and those that are particular favorites among students. As a direct reflection of popular culture, subculture, and current events, popular music provides insight into values, issues, and social, political, and economic factors, cultural/personal identities. We will consider issues of musical change, globalization and hybridization, music as a populist expression and political protest, and the influence of technology, the recording industry, and marketing (e.g., album covers, music video, etc). Such issues will be explored through directed reading and listening assignments, written assignments, field assignments, mini-presentations of musical analyses, and focused class discussion. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT .

 

HONS 2311-H01            The Middle East                  (CRN #24736)            Prof. M. Maqusi        MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

                                In a Globalizing World                SEMINAR

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

This course is aimed at offering an introductory study of contemporary Middle East issues, with particular reference to and emphasis on issues of cultural (including brief comparative readings of the three monotheistic religions), economic and socio-political reforms as well as contemporary developments of Middle Eastern international relations. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES, MULTICULTURAL AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 3300-H01    Individual Honors Research                         Contact: Donna Srader           (806) 742-1828   

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors College and approved Honors thesis project application on file.

Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.  Independent work under the individual guidance of a faculty member, who must be either a member of the graduate faculty or approved by the Honors Dean.

FULL

HONS 3301-H02    Bridging the Gap Between the          (CRN #14946)        Prof. K. Ketner        TR 9:30-10:50 AM

                                    Sciences and the Humanities                      SEMINAR

One often encounters the assumption that there is an overwhelming separation between science and the arts/humanities. This course will consider that alleged division, and explore the hypothesis that the divide is an illusion.  We will consider the possibility that these disciplines include unifying common features when viewed through the lens of interdisciplinary study of methods.  Another feature of the class will be the opportunity to open a dialogue between these two grand aspects of human intellectual endeavor.  For this semester, we will focus on the special topic of religion as it might function in this context.  Assignments: Term Paper, Journals (one page per class meeting), xeroxed readings to be provided as class proceeds, one textbook.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

Cancelled

HONS 3301-H05    Africa’s Role in the                  (CRN #14968)                 Prof. T. Nagy              W 2:00-4:50 PM

                              Contemporary World                                    SEMINAR

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

Africa is the continent least understood by Americans; it is often presented by the media as a land of war, famine, and pestilence.  This course will present Africa's contemporary reality – the positive as well as the negative – by examining major current issues after briefly surveying Africa's history, geography, societies, and culture.  Themes covered will include: political dynamics; regional conflicts; human rights and women's issues; economic development and poverty (including the role played by international assistance); involvement of external forces and globalization; refugees and migration; and environmental and public health crisis (including HIV/AIDS).  The course will also examine Africa's role in current U.S. global policy priorities, including US security concerns.  The required texts are: Understanding Contemporary Africa (edited by April and Donald Gordon); Things Fall Apart (Chinua Achebe); and supplemental articles designated by the instructor and available in a compendium.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3302-H01      Perspectives on Technology     (CRN #29510)         Prof. M. Maqusi         MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

                                    and Culture                                    SEMINAR

This course is intended to help examine, in brief, the role of science and technology and their impact on our society. In particular, we explore, at some length, the impact of modern technology on social development and societal cultural changes. In this latter respect, particular reference is made to the roles played by IT-based technologies and the ever-evolving information revolution. Local as well as global perspectives are interjected in the course coverage.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 3302-H02        Early Clinical Experience        (CRN# 29877)       Prof. Lara Johnson        W 1:00-4:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: Application to take this course is mandatory.  Enrollment is limited to Honors students only.  Eligible students must be May/August/Dec 2014 TTU graduates (as shown on the Tech system) with steady progress made toward completion of medical school science requirements. Students must submit to a criminal background check and will need to pass a TB test prior to entry in the class.  APPLICATION DEADLINE: May 11.  Contact sarah.timmons@ttu.edu for questions.

This course block, which runs from August 27 through December 5, 2012, provides the framework for Pre-Med students to learn the fundamental concepts of the various roles and responsibilities of physicians. Learning occurs in several settings including classroom instruction, small group forums, and clinical settings.   The students also explore ethical, cultural, psychological, and economic dimensions of clinical care through these various learning settings. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CIRRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE AND JR/SR LEVEL HONORS SEMINAR CREDIT.

FULL

HONS 3304-H02      The Performing Arts as         (CRN #15022)            Prof. A. Duffy            TR 2:00-3:20 PM

                                 Social and Political Statement                 SEMINAR

The Arts as Social and Political Statement will focus on the impact of the arts on American society from  the early 1900s to present day. A sweeping introduction to specific works that have drawn controversy, asked questions, and opened minds will be included. We will look mostly at performance art, dance, and visual art as catalysts for social and political expression. Specific artists studied will include Pablo Picasso, Karen Finley, Bill T. Jones, Martha Graham, and Robert Mapplethorpe among others. We will ask questions of the artists and of each other in effort to determine art’s position in society, and whether it truly promotes effectual change. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 4300-H01    Individual Honors Research                         Contact: Donna Srader             (806) 742-1828

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors College and approved Honors thesis/project application on file.

Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.  Independent work under the individual guidance of a faculty member, who must be either a member of the graduate faculty or approved by the Honors Dean.

 

HONS 4301-H01      Torts Law (LAW 5404)                    (CRN #24624)                Prof. R. Rosen                    TBA

SEMINAR

[Note: This course is cross-listed with TTU Law School Course LAW 5404. Student evaluation will be based upon a final examination administered at the end of the semester.  Application to take this course is required and should be submitted to sarah.timmons@ttu.edu by Tuesday, March 20th.  Enrollment is limited to Honors students only. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis for undergraduate students.]  

Introduction to standards and principles governing legal liability for intentional and unintentional invasions of interests of personality and property. Students receiving a grade of C+ or better in the course who later matriculate at the Texas Tech University School of Law may not be required to repeat the course if approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs when another course or courses are available in the same subject area which may be taken in substitution for equivalent credit hours which will then be a part of such student’s required first-year curriculum.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 4301-H01      Contracts                    (CRN #28796)                Prof. B. Shannon                          TBA

SEMINAR

Note: This course is cross-listed with TTU Law School Course LAW 5402. Student evaluation will be based upon a final examination administered at the end of the semester. Application to take this course is due on Wednesday, April 11th.  Enrollment is limited to Honors students only. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis for undergraduate students (form required).

A study of the enforceability of promises, the creation of contractual obligations, performance and breach, the impact of the contract on the legal relationships of nonparties, and the examination of contract doctrine in three settings: personal services, sales of goods, and construction contracts.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HUM 2301-H01      The Western Tradition:         (CRN #15030)      Prof. J. Brink          TR 9:30-10:50 AM

                               Beginnings to Renaissance     SEMINAR

This course allows us to plunge into the iconic written works and creative art and architecture of the West from the origins of civilization to the Renaissance of the 1500s. Here are the very foundations of what is still evoked and invoked today.  What has made these achievements of civilization so iconic?  From the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Bible, The Iliad and The Odyssey to the great Greek dramas on to Boethius, Dante, and Machiavelli, we explore that which has shaped us as a culture.  We are the way we are as a large result of the thoughts and works of the giants of our Western world.  This seminar will engage us in discussion of the great questions of life; we will tussle with free will, sin, morality and ethics, authority, and cultural “identity” among other weighty matters.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS THREE HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES REQUIREMENT.

Cancelled

I E 3301-H01   Engineering Economics Analysis       (CRN #29290)        Prof. I. Rivero        TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Prerequisite: MATH 1351.

This course will present engineering students with the major concepts and techniques involved in the economics of engineering, capital budgeting, work performance, and project management. Upon completion of this course, students will have obtained the basic knowledge in engineering economics theory and practice (practical application of the concepts and theory) so as to solve basic level engineering economy related problems. Additional objectives for this course are to increase student ability to: a) apply knowledge of math, science, and engineering, b) to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems, and c) to provide students with methods and techniques for making economic decisions under risk and uncertainty. In order to achieve these objectives, the course lectures will use math, science, and engineering to articulate and solve engineering economic analysis problems. Case study examples will also be presented to illustrate a structured approach to solving engineering problems using engineering economic analysis. Additional material to be covered includes expanded coverage of basic topics such as breakeven and sensitivity analysis and expected value techniques, and survey coverage of advanced material, such as real options. The assessment criteria used for these objectives will be homework assignments, team case studies, and exams.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP BEHAVIOR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

MATH 1451-H01   Calculus I with Applications         (CRN #29411)      Prof. R. Barnard         MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

                                                                            Non-Credit Applications Lab                                    M 9:00-9:50 AM

Prerequisite: Score of 7 on Math Placement Exam; or score of 3 on AP AB Calculus and score of 5 on Math Placement Exam; or 660/29 on the Math section of the SAT/ACT; or MATH 1350 or 1550 with grade B or better; or score of 5 on MPE and MATH 1321 with grade B or better; or MATH 1321 with grade A.

Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of the derivative, differentials, indefinite integrals, definite integrals.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 1452-H01   Calculus II with Applications        (CRN #29573)       Prof. G. Williams        MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

                                                                                  Non-Credit Applications Lab                                M 1:00-1:50 PM

Prerequisite: MATH 1451 with a grade of B- or better.

Methods of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions, applications.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 2360-H01   Linear Algebra                     (CRN #15055)                 Prof. E. Allen               TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 1452 with a grade of B- or better.

This course will involve a balance of theory, application and computation.  The many uses of linear algebra will be emphasized in conjunction with the philosophy that serious applications of linear algebra require some computing capability.  To this end the course will involve significant use of MATLAB.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 2450-H01   Calculus III with Applications                (CRN# 29409)              Prof. L. Juan       TR 1:00-2:50 PM

Prerequisite: MATH 1452 with a grade of B- or better.

Partial differentiation; functions of several variables; multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes Theorem.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 3342-H01   Mathematical Statistics for        (CRN #29435)       Prof. J. Surles        TR 12:30 AM-1:50 PM

                              Engineers and Scientists

Prerequisite: MATH 2450. MATH 3342 and 4342 cannot both be counted toward a mathematics major or minor.

This course is designed to cover topics from mathematical statistics that are of interest to students from engineering and/or the sciences. Topics will include descriptive statistics, elementary probability, random variables and their distributions, mean, variance, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, and analysis of variance.  In addition, students will get hands-on experience in the process of experimentation, data collection, and analysis via a group project where students will propose an experiment, get approval, design the experiment and data collection methodology/protocols, run/conduct the experiment and gather data, then analyze the data and draw conclusions.  This will all be presented in a written report as well as an oral presentation before their peers.

 

MATH 3350-H01   Higher Math for Engineers          (CRN #21206)      Prof. A. Ibraguimov     TR 12:30 AM-1:50 PM

                              and Scientists

Note: This course is open to Math minors, but does not fulfill degree requirements for Math majors.

Prerequisite: MATH 2450 with a grade of B- or better.

Ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, and other selected topics.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions.

 

MATH 4000-H01   Creative Mathematics            (CRN #29572)               Prof. C. Seaquist             TR 9:30-10:50 AM

SEMINAR

Note: MATH 4000 may substitute for anything above MATH 2360 for Math minor per department.

Note: Preference will be given to Honors freshmen and sophomores. Upperclassmen will be placed on a waitlist until mid-July, when available spots will be opened up.

Corequisites: MATH 1451.

This course will provide an environment in which to create mathematics. Specifically it will help students learn to make and criticize mathematical arguments and counter examples. In the process students will be learning about properties of the real numbers, which form the theoretical foundation for the calculus. The only intellectual requirement for this course is a desire and willingness to think and to share mathematical ideas. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

MBIO 3401-H01    Principles of Microbiology    (CRN #28217)     Prof. M. San Francisco     MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

                                                                                                                 & Prof. R. Jeter 

MBIO 3401-H51    Lab                                              (CRN #15253)                                                 TR 9:30-11:20 AM

Prerequisite: CHEM 3305, BIOL 1403, BIOL 1404

Principles of Microbiology is a survey of the microbial world.  We cover the breadth of microbiology.  From the early developmental stages of the discipline to its enormous growth and role in our understanding of disease, metabolic processes, molecular biology, the ecology of the planet, gene regulation, immunity and food safety.  From bioterrorism to biotechnology and the most important bio-geochemical processes on the plant; from the depths of the oceans to life in extra terrestrial environments.  This will be a text- and literature-driven, discussion-based interactive course!

 

ME 2301- H01         Statics                        (CRN #24854)            TBA                              TR 2:00-3:20 PM

Prerequisites: MATH 1452, PHYS 1408

The Mechanical Engineering discipline may be broadly divided into two fundamental topical areas: thermal sciences (thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer) and mechanical sciences (statics, solid mechanics, and dynamics).  Statics is the introductory course for the mechanical sciences.  Course topics include the fundamental principles and analysis procedures for particles, rigid bodies, and systems of rigid bodies in static equilibrium and an introduction to solid mechanics or the determination of stresses and deformations in bodies in static equilibrium. Honors Engineering Mechanics I also includes an introduction to the numerical methods of structural analysis.  Although this course is designed for engineering majors, it is also appropriate for non-majors with a potential interest in engineering or a general interest in technological topics.  The Honors section of Statics differs from normal sections as it includes an introduction to the numerical methods of structural analysis, and is much smaller in order to allow more opportunities for student-faculty interaction.

 

MGT 4380-H01      Strategic Management            (CRN #15064)           Prof. C. Duran                W 2:00-4:50 PM

Prerequisites: Business students only who have completed BLAW 3391, ISQS 3344, FIN 3320, MKT 3350, MGT 3370, and MGT 3373 with grades of C or higher and are in their final semester.  No COBA classifications permitted.

Strategic Management is the capstone, integrative course for graduating business administration students. This is an exciting, challenging course that focuses on how firms formulate, implement, and evaluate strategies. Students use all the knowledge and concepts acquired from prior business courses, integrate them with new strategic-management techniques, and use them to chart the future direction of different organizations. The major responsibility of students in this course is to make objective strategic decisions and to justify them through oral presentations and written case studies. This course is taught using active learning and experiential techniques and is primarily discussion-based, but also has written components. Critical thinking skills are required for the experiential exercises and case analyses and will be enhanced during this course. This honors course periodically contains a service learning experience and case. Service learning is an active learning technique that combines application of course concepts, interaction with a community partner, and reflective components. The students will have the chance to apply the strategic management concepts learned in this course in a real world setting.

FULL

MKT 3350-H01          Introduction to Marketing          (CRN #24601)          Prof. J. Wilcox         TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: ECO 2301 or AAEC 2305 or ECO 2305

Students must have a declared business major or minor or BAUD classification

The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the discipline of marketing, both as a philosophy of business and as a series of business practices. The course will explore the field of marketing, as it directs the organization’s resources to satisfy customers’ wants and needs through the exchange process, at a reasonable profit to the organization. Specifically, we will examine how marketers: understand consumers’ needs and wants; develop products and services that provide superior value; and how they price, distribute, and promote products and services effectively, both domestically and internationally. The course will direct your study of the organization (either a profit-oriented firm or a non-profit organization) as a market entity existing in a competitive environment. The emphasis will be on understanding the importance of quality, value, and customer relationship management in obtaining a competitive advantage in today’s marketplace. In addition, we will consider the ethical and societal issues related to marketing. The course will emphasize service learning where you will work with a real client organization to solve marketing problems through research and analysis.

FULL

PHYS 1408-H01     Principles of Physics I            (CRN# 29511)               TBA             TR 12:30-1:50 PM

PHYS 1408-H51     Principles of Physics I Lab      (CRN# 18087)                 Staff                              M 2:00-3:50 PM

PHYS 1408-719     Principles of Physics I Discussion      (CRN# 28218)                 Staff                    F 2:00-2:50 PM

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.

Prerequisite:  MATH 1451

Corequisite:  PHYS 1408-H51 Lab and PHYS 1408-719 Discussion.

Calculus-based introductory physics course. Mechanics, kinematics, energy, momentum, gravitation, waves, and thermodynamics. The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

PHYS 2401-H01     Principles of Physics II                (CRN# 22775)         TBA              TR 9:30-10:50 AM

PHYS 2401-H51     Principles of Physics II Lab          (CRN# 22776)                 Staff                       W 2:00-3:50 PM

PHYS 2401-751     Principles of Physics II Lab          (CRN# 30050)                 Staff                      

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.

Prerequisites: PHYS 1408 and MATH 1352

Corequisite: PHYS 2401-H51, PHYS 2401-751

Calculus-based introductory physics. Electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and optics. The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

POLS 2302-H02        American Public Policy              (CRN# 15080)        Prof. D. Patterson       TR 2:00-3:20 PM

Note:  You need not take POLS 1301 and 2302 in any particular order.

We are currently in an age of radical change. Public policies, from health care to education policy, punishment to corporate regulation – are under a new scrutiny in the contemporary climate of economic crisis, and for many citizens, existential crisis – crises that are about the very means by which Americans will live. In this course we will examine particular public policies, their impact on the masses of Americans, and on specific subpopulations (such as Latinos and African Americans) to better understand the significance of this transformative period in public policy that the nation is now undergoing. The major assignments for this course are weekly writing assignments, an in-class presentation of a research topic of your choosing that is relevant to the course material, and a final essay exam.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM POLITICAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

PSY 3301-H01        Psychology of the Arts              (CRN# 20332)        Prof. S. Harter       TR 2:00-3:20 PM

SEMINAR

In this course we will examine applications of psychological theories and methodologies to the arts, including artistic creativity, production, and appreciation.  The format encourages dialogue about issues in the psychology of the arts.  Class discussions, presentations, a final paper, and other class exercises encourage students to actively make meaning and apply course content to their own interests and experience, critically considering issues presented in class readings and discussions and elaborating beyond readings to generate creative applications of material.  Issues considered include similarities and differences between science and art, the potential contributions that psychology can make to understanding artistic processes, and the potential contributions that the arts can make to psychology.  We examine psychological theories and methods used in the study of creativity and the arts from specialties within psychology including developmental, perceptual, cognitive, social, biological, and clinical.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

PSY 4336-H01        Research in Personality & Social       (CRN# 30367)        Prof. J Larsen      MWF 3:00-3:50 PM

                               Psychology: Mixed Emotions         SEMINAR

Prerequisite: Students must be junior or senior standing.

We are all familiar with how it feels to experience positive emotions like happiness, contentment, and excitement, and negative emotions like sadness, anger, and fear. But can we experience mixed emotions in which positive and negative feelings co-occur? The poet W.H. Auden suggested that "Poetry might be defined as the clear expression of mixed feelings," but is poetry the only way to gain insight into the experience of mixed emotions? In studying the psychology of mixed emotions, we will explore the provocative claim that we can gain additional insight into mixed emotions using rigorous measurement, careful experimentation, and other tools of the scientist. This will be no easy task: the seemingly-simple task of measuring emotions can be more difficult than measuring the size of distant stars, even though emotions are in our heads and the nearest star is light years away. Students from all majors are invited to take this opportunity to delve deeply into the growing body of research on mixed emotions in order to grapple with old questions and indentify new ones.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

SPAN 2301-H01     Second Course in Spanish I          (CRN# 10942)            Prof. J. McNutt           TR 9:00-9:50AM

Prerequisite: SPAN 1502 or 1507.

This course emphasizes listening, reading, written and oral skills in order to develop students' communicative competence. In addition, this course will place significant emphasis on the development of students' intercultural competence through reading texts and written assignments.  The development of all these crucial skills are integrated in a highly interactive and fun environment in which students practice and improve their Spanish every day.