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Fall 2014 First-Year Experience Courses

Note: All freshmen entering the Honors College Fall 2014 are required to take one (and only one) of the First-Year Experience courses listed below.  If you need assistance in selecting the FYE course which may be the best fit for you, feel free to contact an Honors Advisor.

FALL 2014 FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE COURSE OFFERINGS

ARCH 1311-H01    Design, Environment, and Society      (CRN# 31302)             Prof. U. Flueckiger              MW 10:00-11:20 AM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H01 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20410)             Student Mentors                  M 4:00-5:20 PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
Introduction to architecture as an integral component of a complex world. Examination of societal and environmental contexts and appropriate design responses. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS.
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COMS 2300-H01    Introduction to Public Speaking         (CRN# 14799)             Prof. N. Carter                   MWF 10:00-10:50 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H03 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20510)             Student Mentors                M 4:00-5:20 PM

Jerry Seinfeld once stated that “According to most studies, people's number one fear is public speaking. Number two is death. Death is number two. Does that sound right? This means to the average person, if you go to a funeral, you're better off in the casket than doing the eulogy.” Come learn how to master the art of public speaking! Communication is more than just getting a message from point A to point B; true communication happens on a deeper level to create more positive results. Join us as we discover ways to communicate more effectively personally and professionally. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM ORAL COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENT.
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ECO 2301-H01       Principles of Economics I                     (CRN# 31301)             Prof. R. Al-Hmoud                 TR 9:30-10:50 AM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H08 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20515)             Student Mentors                    W 4:00-5:20 PM

Principles of Economics I introduces students to the principles of microeconomics. This part of economics examines individual economic units and markets for products and resources. The course consists of three parts. The first part deals with the nature of economics and the economizing problem and the methods of handling this problem. This part analyzes the decision-making by households and firms, and the constraints facing them while maximizing their objectives. The second part focuses on the various aspects of the product market. These include pure competition, pure monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. The last part covers the resources market. Emphasis is on labor and capital and the prices for these resources, which result in incomes to people in the form of wages, rent, interest, and profit. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT.
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ENGL 2305-H01    Introduction to Poetry: The Self and the World (CRN# 28863)           Prof. W. Wenthe     TR 11:00-12:20 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H07 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20509)             Student Mentors                     W 4:00-5:20 PM

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302
Course description will be posted soon. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENTS.
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ENGL 2391-H01    Intro to Critical Writing                       (CRN# 24990)             Prof. M. Borshuk                   TR 2:00-3:20 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H14 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20521)             Student Mentors                     W 4:00-5:20 PM

Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302
This course will introduce students to the conventions of literary criticism. We will focus on developing close reading skills and interpretation, on articulating sustained arguments about literature in academic prose, and on building both a working knowledge of approaches and a critical vocabulary to allow for those goals. We will consider a variety of texts in different genres: prose, poetry and drama. Students should note that this course is both discussion-heavy and writing intensive. Informed participation is expected, and students will be required to complete four formal essays as well as a number of informal writing assignments.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENTS.
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ENGL 2391-H02    Intro to Critical Writing                       (CRN# 33066)             Prof. K. Caswell                     TR 2:00-3:20 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H02 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20509)             Student Mentors                   M 4:00-5:20 PM

Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302
This course will introduce students to the conventions of literary criticism. We will focus on developing close reading skills and interpretation, on articulating sustained arguments about literature in academic prose, and on building both a working knowledge of approaches and a critical vocabulary to allow for those goals. We will consider a variety of texts in different genres: prose, poetry and drama. Students should note that this course is both discussion-heavy and writing intensive. Informed participation is expected, and students will be required to complete four formal essays as well as a number of informal writing assignments.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENTS.
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ENGR 1315-H01    Introduction to Engineering                (CRN# 14829)             Prof. D. Ernst                    TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H04 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20511)             Student Mentors              W 4:00-5:20 PM

Note: This course is open to all Honors engineering and non-engineering majors and may be substituted for the following discipline-specific Introduction to Engineering courses: CH E 1305, CE 1305, EE 1304, IE 1305, ME 1315, and PETR 1305. This course should also be of interest to non-engineering majors who have an interest in technology or a desire to learn more about an engineering discipline.
Corequisites: MATH 1451
This course is designed to introduce engineering and non-engineering freshmen to the opportunities and challenges offered by a career in engineering.  Through an exploration of the new and evolving technologies and the national and international issues relating to energy conservation, production, and consumption, students are given a preview of the problems and analyses typical of mechanical, civil, electrical, chemical, industrial, petroleum, and computer science engineering.  Students also gain experience in the application of basic computer tools (e.g., Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Mathcad, MATLAB) to analyses, reports, and presentations typical of engineering.  Finally, students develop an understanding and appreciation of the design process and the open-ended problems found in the practice of engineering.

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ENGR 1315-H02    Introduction to Engineering                (CRN# 20135)             Prof. D. Ernst                     MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H05 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20512)             Student Mentors              M 4:00-5:20 PM

Note: This course is open to all Honors engineering and non-engineering majors and may be substituted for the following discipline-specific Introduction to Engineering courses: CH E 1305, CE 1305, EE 1304, IE 1305, ME 1315, and PETR 1305. This course should also be of interest to non-engineering majors who have an interest in technology or a desire to learn more about an engineering discipline.
Corequisites: MATH 1451
This course is designed to introduce engineering and non-engineering freshmen to the opportunities and challenges offered by a career in engineering.  Through an exploration of the new and evolving technologies and the national and international issues relating to energy conservation, production, and consumption, students are given a preview of the problems and analyses typical of mechanical, civil, electrical, chemical, industrial, petroleum, and computer science engineering.  Students also gain experience in the application of basic computer tools (e.g., Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Mathcad, MATLAB) to analyses, reports, and presentations typical of engineering.  Finally, students develop an understanding and appreciation of the design process and the open-ended problems found in the practice of engineering.

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GEOG 2300-HS1   Introduction to Human Geography    (CRN# 24618)             Prof. G. Elbow                        MWF 8:00-8:50 AM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H15 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20522)             Student Mentors                   M 4:00-5:20 PM

This is not a typical geography class where you learn how much it rains in Outer Zambodia, how many bananas are produced in Eastern Tropicalistan, or what the capital of Monotinia is. GEOG 2300 is organized around the theme of human well-being. This means that we look at how well-off people are in different places. We do this at different scales—for the local area (Lubbock and West Texas), for the United States, and for the world. We look at where rich and poor people live and at some of the factors that cause differences in human well-being from place to place. Human well-being is more than just what the average family income of a place is. We look at health, education, quality of housing, access to healthy food and water, and a wide variety of other indicators well-being. In order for students to experience differences in human well-being first hand, this class will require everyone enrolled to perform at least 20 hours of volunteer service with a local agency that provides services to an economically disadvantaged population. Part of  the coursework will involve writing reflection papers based on your volunteer experience.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS THE CORE CURRICULUM SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS.  
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HDFS 2322-H01     Partnering: The Development         (CRN# 30114)             Prof. S. Thomas-Jackson     MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H17 LCG Section                       (CRN# 23166)             Student Mentors                 W 4:00-5:20 PM

Intimate relationships are a part of every person’s life. These relationships come in many shapes and sizes (parents, siblings, friends, romantic partners, etc). All relationships are developed, are sustained or come to an end. Would you like to better understand intimate relationships, how relationships develop, how they can be maintained, difficulties that arise in relationships and how to overcome conflict? Then this course is for you. This course is designed to provide an overview of intimate relationships from adolescence through adulthood, with an emphasis on relationship processes, diversity in types of partnering, and developmental/contextual variations in relationships. The course will review the various phases of relationship development (e.g., attraction, maintenance, dissolution, reconfiguration), and address the ways in which relationships are affected by individual (e.g., cognition, personality), couple (e.g., love, sexuality, conflict, communication), and contextual (e.g., social network) factors.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS.

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HIST 2300-H01      History of the US to 1877                      (CRN# 14852)             Prof. G. Bell                     MW 1:00-2:20 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H10 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20517)             Student Mentors             M 4:00-5:20 PM

Note: You need not take HIST 2300 before taking HIST 2301.
This course lets you answer for yourself some of the thorniest questions in American history: how did this disparate set of British colonies become one nation? Why did the national structure break apart into Civil War less than a century later? Readings, writing assignments, and discussions all provide access to the methods historians use to answer such questions and investigate the human condition. Primary source readings will inform your analysis of debates concerning historical events and processes, while the textbook and secondary sources provide both the necessary narrative spine and many alternative explanations that historians have considered for these claims. This hands-on examination of historical issues requires your active engagement and participation, so come prepared to think!  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM AMERICAN HISTORY REQUIREMENT.

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HIST 2301-H01      History of the US Since 1877               (CRN# 14859)             Prof. M. Levario                   MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H11 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20518)             Student Mentors                 W 4:00-5:20 PM

Note: You need not take HIST 2300 before taking HIST 2301.
This course will discuss, in an overview format, all of the main currents--political, economic, and social, etc.--of American history since 1877.  Of special interest will be such American turning points as the second  industrial revolution, imperialism, the two World Wars, the Great Depression, Viet Nam and the current political scene.  The course focuses on broad patterns and interpretations rather than a collection of independent facts.  Two elements especially distinguish this particular class: an emphasis on discussion over sometimes controversial issues and an awareness of current events, which are nothing more than a continuation of the American story through the present. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM AMERICAN HISTORY REQUIREMENT. 

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HONS 1301-H01    Windows on World War I                     (CRN# 33065)             Prof. J. Brink                      TR 9:30-10:50 AM        
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H16 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20523)             Student Mentors               W 4:00-5:20 PM

This course is a seminar on themes (windows) in World War I (1914-1918).  This, “the war to end all wars”, was a major watershed in the Western World.  Massive armies of conscript soldiers employed and suffered from sophisticated and terrible technology.  Yet the conduct of the war, especially on the Western Front, was for the most part static along a 450 mile line from the North Sea to Switzerland.  During periods of inactivity, soldiers wrote, sang, and drew, expressing their feelings and reactions to this human catastrophe in ways which ennobled them as soldiers and as humans and which have left a wondrous record of their experiences.  Beginning with an in-depth section of lecture and discussion of the history of the war, we will probe the social and literary history of soldiers on the Western Front.  The remainder of the course will consist of class presentations and written reports.  Topics will be selected during the first weeks of the term. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENT.

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HONS 1301-H02   Wonder Woman; Gender, Power, and the Nation in American Popular Culture
                                                                                                (CRN# 33945)            Prof. K. Williams                   TR 12:30-1:50 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H18 LCG Section                       (CRN# 23167)             Student Mentors                 W 4:00-5:20 PM

Although Wonder Woman has yet to get the repeated box office treatment awarded to Superman, the two comics address many of the same themes. Wonder Woman initially did so from a unique perspective, one that argued that “beautiful and brave” women were the only people who could rescue “a world torn by the hatreds and the wars of men.” This original Wonder Woman from the 1940s reflected the heavy social emphasis on women’s labor and patriotism during World War II, and later versions of Wonder Woman similarly reflected the roles prescribed for and available to women in contemporary society. In this class, we will use Wonder Woman as the primary text through which we explore changing ideas about gender and American cultural identity since the World War II era. We will use the Wonder Woman comic to explore the following aspects of American ideas about gender: pop cultural representations, body image, sexuality and sexual orientation, masculinity, the politics of marriage and family, labor and class, social movements, patriotism, American exceptionalism, partisan politics, foreign policy and warfare, and the so-called “American dream.”THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENT.

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HONS 1301-H03    The Mother Earth Chronicles              (CRN# 21978)             Prof. S. Tomlinson          TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H06 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20513)             Student Mentors             M 4:00-5:20 PM

Note: After the first class, some class meetings will be held outdoors. If you cannot attend the first session, contact the instructor immediately.
“The Mother Earth Chronicles” is a fun, gentle, thought-provoking exploration of literary and film works about nature, environment, and landscape. In this course, you can expect to cover a wide and diverse range of topics about living with “Mother”—everything from bees, to homesteading, to white water rafting. This is also an excellent opportunity to practice writing in a workshop/tutorial format; if you’ve always thought that writing is a boring, excruciating, mind-numbing, pointless exercise in formulaic drivel and pap, well then, you’ve never done any writing like this. This course is writing intensiveTHIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENT.
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HONS 1304-H02    Introduction to Symphony                      (CRN# 24835)             Prof. T. Cimarusti    TR 12:30-1:50 PM        
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H20 LCG Section                            (CRN# 28864)             Student Mentors     M 4:00-5:20 PM

What do Mozart, Beethoven, and Brahms all have in common? Not only are the considered three of the most important composers in music history, but each of them also composed some of the most significant symphonies that changed the course of the symphonic tradition. In this course, we will define the genre of the symphony and discuss its evolution from the Baroque period to the 20th century. Highlights of the course will include attendance of live performances of the TTU Symphony Orchestra, the Lubbock Symphony Orchestra, and special visits by professional orchestra members and conductors! THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM CREATIVE ARTS REQUIREMENTS.

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HONS 2406-H01    Honors Integrated Science                   (CRN# 14928)             Prof. M. McGinley               MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
HONS 2406-H51    No-Credit Lab                                         (CRN# 20199)             Prof. M. McGinley                R 2:00-4:50 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H19 LCG Section                       (CRN# 25100)             Student Mentors                  W 4:00-5:20 PM
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HONS 2406-H02    Honors Integrated Science                   (CRN# 34410)             Prof. M. San Francisco      TR 4:00-5:20 PM
HONS 2406-H52    No-Credit Lab                                         (CRN# 34411)             Prof. M. San Francisco       T 5:20-8:10 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H21 LCG Section                       (CRN# 31505)             Student Mentors                 M 4:00-5:20 PM
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IE 2311-H01   Engineering Economic Analysis    (CRN# 34495)             Prof. J. Carrell                        MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H22 LCG Section         (CRN# 34496)             Student Mentors                     M 4:00-5:20 PM

Prerequisite: MATH 1451. Evaluation of economics of engineering proposals for cost and profitability. THIS COURSE FULFILLS THE CORE CURRICULUM SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS.  

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MATH 1451-H02   Calculus I with Applications                 (CRN# 29412)            Prof. C. Seaquist                 TR 12:30-1:50 PM No-Credit Lab     T 2:00-2:50 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H13 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20520)             Student Mentors                 W 4:00-5:20 PM

Prerequisite: Score of 7 on Math Placement Exam; or score of 3 on the AP AB Calculus exam and a score of 5 on the MPE; or 660/29 on the Math section of the SAT/ACT; or MATH 1350 or 1550 with B- or better; or score of 5 on MPE and MATH 1321 with B- or better.
Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of the derivative, differentials, indefinite integrals, definite integrals.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.
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PHIL 2320-H01      Introduction to Ethics                           (CRN# 20414)             Prof. D. Nathan                       TR 2:00-3:20 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H12 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20519)             Student Mentors                     W 4:00-5:20 PM

So how ought persons behave toward one another?  And does it even make any sense to reason about moral questions in the first place?  After all, perhaps morality is just an individual subjective response, like one's taste in ice cream.  Or maybe it's just a matter of religious dogma, so that one needn't think for oneself or bother trying to reason about it at all.  Or perhaps all behavior boils down to self-interest anyway, so that talk of "moral obligation" is merely empty rhetoric.  And, if it is not empty talk, what could possibly ground moral obligation?  Imagine having one of those heavy late-night dorm discussions, but with Plato, Thomas Hobbes, John Stuart Mill, and Immanuel Kant chiming in.  You will find that, even though those folks are long dead, it turns out that they had a lot to say about matters of morality that still concern us deeply today.  In this course, we will explore the potential of thinking carefully and creatively about morality, and we will do so in the company of some of the giants of Western moral philosophy.  (Did you know that the 17th Century philosopher, Thomas Hobbes, even came up with a theory to explain why people stay late at parties?)  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENT.
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PSY 1300-H01        General Psychology                               (CRN# 15084)             Prof. J. Clopton                      TR 9:30-10:50 PM
Corequisite: HONS 1000-H09 LCG Section                       (CRN# 20516)             Student Mentors                     M 4:00-5:20 PM

Have you ever wondered why people do the things they do? Have you ever wondered why they think the way they think? This course is designed to introduce the field of psychology and its many topics, theories, and contributions to understanding human behavior and thought. Application of psychology to various aspects of everyday life, investigation of the impact of culture on psychological processes, and critical analysis of research will be emphasized. Topics will include emotion, motivation, sensation and perception, personality formation, social behavior, intelligence, and psychological disorders. This course is an engaging, fun, and thought-provoking course that has real-life applicability in virtually every discipline.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT.

FALL 2014 FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE COURSES

 

ARCH 1311-H01     Design, Environment, and Society, Prof. U. Flueckiger  MW 10:00-11:20 AM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM

COMS 2300-H01    Introduction to Public Speaking, Prof. N. Carter  MWF 10:00-10:50 AM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM

ECO 2301-H01       Principles of Economics I, Prof. R. Al-Hmoud  TR 9:30-10:50 AM; LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

ENGL 2305-H01     Introduction to Poetry, Prof. W. Wenthe    TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM; LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

ENGL 2391-H01     Introduction to Critical Writing, Prof. M. Borshuk  TR 2:00- 3:20 PM; LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

ENGL 2391-H02     Introduction to Critical Writing, Prof. K. Caswell  TR 2:00- 3:20 PM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM

ENGR 1315-H01     Introduction to Engineering, Prof. D. Ernst  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM; LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

ENGR 1315-H02     Introduction to Engineering, Prof. D. Ernst   MWF 1:00-1:50 PM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM

GEOG 2300-H01     Introduction to Human Geography, Prof. G. Elbow  MWF 8:00-8:50 AM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM

HDFS 2322-H01      Partnering: The Development of Intimate Relationships, Prof. S. Jackson

MWF 11:00-11:50 AM, LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

HIST 2300-H01       History of the U.S. Before 1877, Prof. G. Bell  MW 1:00-2:20 PM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM

HIST 2301-H01       History of the U.S. Since 1877, Prof. M. Levario  MWF 11:00-11:50 AM; LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

HONS 1301-H01     Windows on World War I, Prof. J. Brink  TR 9:30-10:50 AM; LCG  W 4:00-5:20 PM

HONS 1301-H02      Wonder Woman; Gender, Power, and the Nation in American Popular Culture, Prof. K. Williams

TR 12:30-1:50 PM, LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

HONS 1301-H03     The Mother Earth Chronicles, Prof. S. Tomlinson  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM

HONS 1304-H02    Introduction to Symphony,   Prof. T. Cimarusti    TR 12:30-1:50 PM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM        

HONS 2406-H01     Honors Integrated Science, Prof. M. McGinley  MWF 10:00-10:50 AM; LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

HONS 2406-H02     Honors Integrated Science, Prof. M. San Francisco  TR 5:00-5:20 PM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM

IE 2311-H01   Engineering Economic Analysis,  Prof. J. Carrell   MWF 11:00-11:50 AM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM

MATH 1451-H02    Calculus I with Applications, Prof. C. Seaquist  TR 12:30-1:50 PM; LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

PHIL 2320-H01       Introduction to Ethics, Prof. D. Nathan  TR 2:00-3:20 PM; LCG W 4:00-5:20 PM

PSY 1300-H01        General Psychology, Prof. J. Clopton  TR 9:30-10:50 AM; LCG M 4:00-5:20 PM