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Summer & Fall 2014 Course Offerings

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Fall 2014 - First Year Experience Courses

Course offerings from previous semesters:

Spring 2014    Summer/Fall 2013    Spring 2013    Summer/Fall 2012    Spring 2012    Summer/Fall 2011

Substitution Opportunities for Upper-Level Honors Credit

(Six hours only of substitutions permitted per student)

STUDY ABROAD WAIVER

The Honors College believes strongly in the formative power of studying abroad.  Therefore, the Honors College offers a waiver of 3 hours of upper-level Honors course credits through the successful completion of a Study Abroad Waiver in conjunction with a study abroad program.  Through this process, students may earn a waiver for up to 3 hours of Honors non-seminar credit for a summer session, fall or spring semester abroad. Students who study for two separate semesters abroad (full summer, fall or spring) may earn a waiver for up to 6 hours of Honors non-seminar credit. Honors seminars may not be waived.  Studying abroad is a type of experiential learning which is most meaningful when accompanied by organized reflection.  The purpose of the Study Abroad Waiver is to provide opportunity for this reflection.  There are two components to the Study Abroad Waiver: an online journal and an academic reflective essay connecting student experiences abroad to a prescribed book read before leaving.  Students are not allowed to complete a Study Abroad Waiver to earn Honors credit during their final semester before graduation.  Contact Lori Lightfoot or Sarah Timmons for more information.

HONORS COURSE CONTRACT

Honors Contracting allows an Honors student to receive Honors credit for a non-Honors course by completing work above and beyond what is required of students in the course.  Only 3000 and 4000-level courses that meet face-to-face are eligible to be contracted. Graduate courses and cross-listed courses may also be taken for Honors credit. Contracting is not permitted during a student’s final semester before graduation. Contact Lori Lightfoot for more information.

Closed/Full Courses are listed in red.

Red text Indicates a full course section. Once a course is full, the class becomes closed. Students can elect to be placed on a waitlist for a closed course.

SUMMER 2014 COURSE OFFERINGS

Intersession Course:

EVHM 4350-H01   EVHM Capstone Experience:             (CRN# 33443)             Prof. K. Caswell                 May 14- 30, 2014
                                    Leadership and Landscape                     SEMINAR
Course dates: May 14-30, 2014 (Intersession)
Prerequisite: Instructor approval is required; email Professor Caswell at Kurt.Caswell@ttu.edu.
The outdoors is our classroom in this field experience course: a 10-day canoe trip on the lower Green River in SE Utah. We’ll focus our work on developing leadership skills and understanding group dynamics, as well as exploring the natural history of the Green River canyon. Students will take on leadership roles, and be offered peer feedback on judgment and decision-making. Creative and critical writing and reading will complete our training. We’ll conduct writing workshops in the field. In addition, we’ll attend to experiences in solitude and in community in nature, and make a point of exploring the flora, fauna, geology, weathers, archaeology, and history of the river canyon.

THIS COURSE MAY BE TAKEN FOR HONORS SEMINAR or CAPSTONE CREDIT. Special course fee required: $650 (the Honors College will pay $500 of this fee for each student.) This course is open to EVHM majors and minors, and Honors students.

 

Summer I Session Courses:
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HONS 3301-H01    The History of Paris                               (CRN# 30473)             Prof. J. Brink                      June 1-July 1,  2014
                                                                                                           SEMINAR

***STUDY ABROAD IN PARIS: See Dr. Jim Brink in Rm. 213 McClellan Hall for more information.

 

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HONS 3304-H02       Three French Revolutions in Art      (CRN# 33904)             Prof. D. Nathan                   June 1-July 1,  2014
                                                                                                           SEMINAR

 ***STUDY ABROAD IN PARIS: See Dr. Jim Brink in Rm. 213 McClellan Hall for more information.

 

FULL

Summer II Session Courses:

 HONS 3304-H01    Intersections of Film and Dance         (CRN# 68405)             Prof. A. Duffy                     MTWRF 1:00-2:50
                                                                                                           SEMINAR

This course is an overview of the ways in which dance and film influence each other and work in tandem to create complex meaning and understanding, beginning with examples from the 1960s and progressing to current trends.  In doing so, this course will expand the student’s knowledge of the human condition and human cultures as expressed and evidenced through the art form of concert dance, performance art, multimedia art works, and film.  Students will engage in observing dance in video format, critically reading and writing about performance, discussing the various art forms, and exploring performance criticism.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM CREATIVE ARTS AND 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FALL 2014 COURSE OFFERINGS

FULL

ACCT 2300-H01    Financial Accounting                               (CRN# 20419)                 TBA                                TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA, Sophomore standing and a C or better in any college-level mathematics course.
This course is the first course in the accounting sequence and introduces students to all aspects of external financial reporting.  Content includes a basic introduction to the preparation of financial statements and the study of annual reports. Course includes discussion of current topics in financial reporting and research on financial statements of companies listed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

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ANSC 3401-H01     Reproductive Physiology                          (CRN# 10532)                 Prof. S. Prien                   MW 6:00-7:20 PM
ANSC 3401-H50     No-Credit Lab                                             (CRN# 10541)                 Prof. S. Prien                   W 1:00-2:20 PM
ANSC 3401-H70     Discussion                                                    (CRN# 10548)                 Prof. S. Prien                   R 5:00-5:50 PM

Prerequisite: ANSC 2202 and 2306 or ANSC 3405.
Corequisite: ANSC 3401-H50 Lab and ANSC 3401-H70 Discussion
This course will provide students with an opportunity for an in-depth study of the reproductive process as it occurs in farm animals. This course differs from the regular section and will target highly motivated students with a unique integrated intellectual experience. As such, the fundamental aspects of reproductive physiology and management will be presented using a more interactive and personalized approach. Topics covered in the course include male and female reproductive anatomy, endocrine glands, sex determination, cloning, artificial insemination, and embryo transfer.
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ASTR 1401-H01     Stellar Astronomy                                     (CRN# 29544)                 Prof. M. Clark                MWF 3:00-3:50 PM
ASTR 1401-H51     No-Credit Lab                                             (CRN# 29545)                 Prof. M. Clark                F 4:00-5:50 PM

ASTR 1401-751     Discussion                                                    (CRN# 30004)                 Prof. M. Clark

If you have to take a natural science course (which you do), wouldn't you like to take one that mixes aspects of the entire universe into a single course?  Learn things about who we are and why we are here and how we know so much about something so vast.  The best part is that this course is designed to allow you to explore astronomy yourself by taking your own data and analyzing it and then incorporating it into things that we discuss.  You won't have to take my word for it: you will be able to discover the universe for yourself.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT.
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FULL

ATMO 1300-H01   Introduction to Atmospheric Science     (CRN# 24738)                 Prof. D. Haragan           TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Note: Due to some duplication of content, students who have taken Honors Integrated Science with an Atmospheric Science component are not eligible for this class.
Corequisite:  Any section of ATMO 1100 Lab
A descriptive treatment of the science of the atmosphere in its modern dress.  Since all activity in the atmosphere is a response to solar energy, the course will begin with an introduction to radiation, atmospheric composition and the resulting heat balance of the earth-atmosphere system. This will be followed by consideration of the forces that control the state of the atmosphere and atmospheric motion.  Finally, the focus will shift to a discussion of contemporary issues related to atmospheric science such as global warming, environmental pollution, climate change, severe storms and weather modification. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT.

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FULL

BIOL 1403-H01     Biology I                           (CRN# 13607)      Prof. M. Dini         MW 2:00-3:20 PM        
BIOL 1403-H51     No-Credit Lab                  (CRN# 13614)      Staff                       R 2:00-4:50 PM 

Exams T 5:30-7:30 PM                                   
Note: Enrollment in this course is restricted to Honors students.
Prerequisites: 1) One year of HS Biology, and 2) Freshmen must meet one of the following criteria: SAT of 1200, ACT of 26, or AP Biology score of 3.  Instructor strongly recommends taking CHEM 1307 first.
Corequisite: BIOL 1403-H51 Lab section.
Honors Biology I is designed especially with the sophomore life sciences major in mind.  This course helps students build a strong foundation in cell biology, biochemistry, genetics (both molecular and classical), reproductive and developmental biology and evolutionary biology.  Along with helping students construct a knowledge base in biology, the course will also challenge students to think about problems as biologists think about them.  Rather than listening to lectures, students in this course will do their basic research/reading outside of class, whereas class time will be used to refine and clarify understanding, often in the context of small groups.  Students in this course are expected to take a very active and responsible role in their education as biologists. This course has writing intensive requirements.

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FULL

CHEM 1307-H01   Principles of Chemistry I                          (CRN# 14787)                 Prof. D. Casadonte         TR 9:30-10:50 AM
CHEM 1307-701    Required Review Session                          (CRN# 24719)                 Prof. D. Casadonte         M 5:00-6:30 PM
CHEM 1307-702    Required Review Session                          (CRN# 24730)                 Prof. D. Casadonte         T 5:00-6:30 PM

Note: Exams will be held on Wednesday evenings from 7:00-9:00pm. Enrollment in this course is restricted to Honors students.
Prerequisite: A grade of A in CHEM 1301 OR a passing score on the Chemistry Placement Exam; AND at least one year of HS Chemistry; AND a score of 600/26 or better on the Math portion of the SAT/ACT. 
Corequisite: any CHEM 1107 Lab section.
This course focuses on a study of the fundamental concepts of chemistry including nomenclature; chemical reactions; stoichiometry; molecular structure and geometry; bonding concepts and paradigms; thermochemistry; states of matter; the physical characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases; phase transitions; and an introduction to solution properties. This course has a limited enrollment and is taught in a “flipped” format, and as such provides opportunities for direct faculty-student interaction, small group discussion, and hands-on and inquiry-based learning. This course is recommended for students who plan careers in chemistry or in the physical and biological sciences, as well as in medicine or engineering.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT. This course cannot be retaken for grade replacement.

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FULL

CHEM 3305-H01   Organic Chemistry I                                   (CRN# 14791)                 TBA                                   MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
                                                                                                                                                                                                    Exams R 7:00-9:00 PM 
Note: Enrollment in this course is restricted to Honors students.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, CHEM 1107, CHEM 1308 and CHEM 1108 with a grade of B- or better.
Corequisite: CHEM 3105 strongly recommended.
Organic chemistry, the chemistry of carbon compounds, underlies almost all the stuff of modern life, including combustion, biochemistry, food, pharmaceuticals, and plastics. The first semester course begins with the language of organic chemistry, the symbols and concepts that we use to describe, understand and predict the structure and bonding of organic molecules. We then discuss some of the fundamental reactions of organic molecules. The emphasis is on understanding simple reactions so they can be applied to more complex systems.

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FULL

ENGL 2307-H01    Introduction to Fiction:                            (CRN# 14820)                 Prof. J. Shelton               TR 9:30-10:50 AM
The Great War in Fiction

Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302
Coinciding with the 100th anniversary of the start of the Great War (1914-1918), this course will examine the war in fictional representation, including fictionalized memoirs. This course will examine the Great War (1914-1918) in fictional representation, including fictionalized memoirs.  The first war to be fought with modern weapons, but one in which 19th century tactics were used, the Great War continues to live in European imagination as the determinative event of the 20th century.  By looking at fictional texts about this historical event, we will consider how writers have used and altered conventions of fiction in order to enable their representations of the war.  In order to contextualize fictional practices, we will read a bit of war poetry, some historical documents, critical essays, and quasi-fictional texts.  The preliminary reading list includes All Quiet on the Western Front, Regeneration, Mrs. Dalloway, and Undertones of War. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENTS.


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EVHM 3300-H01    Writing for Publication                            (CRN# 33228)                 Prof. K. Caswell             TR 12:30-1:50 PM
                                                                                                               SEMINAR

A writing workshop in creative nonfiction focused on the relationship between people and nature. Students will practice a variety of structural and stylistic approaches with an eye toward developing their personal voice. Research – scientific, philosophical, cultural, theological – will be a major part of the writing process. Students will also learn how to submit their writing for publication. A final student reading will be open to the public. This course has writing intensive requirements.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

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FULL

EVHM 3305-H01   Ecology                                                         (CRN# 28347)                 Prof. M. McGinley         MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
                                                                                                               SEMINAR

Note: This course provides 3 hours of Biology elective credit for Biology majors, but will not substitute for credit toward the degree. This course covers content distinct from that of BIOL 3309.
The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the field of ecology for students in EVHM.  This course will examine ecology of individuals, populations, and communities and introduce you to the techniques that ecologists use to develop hypotheses (including mathematical modeling) and test their hypotheses in the lab and the field. This course has writing intensive requirements. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

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FIN 3320-H01         Finance                                                         (CRN# 33317)                 Prof. G. Cashman          TR 9:30-10:50AM

Prerequisites: C or better in ACCT 2300 and ECO 2302.
Prerequisite or corequisite: C or better in ACCT 2301, ECO 2302, and MATH 2345.
Survey course in finance introducing topics in corporate finance investments and financial institutions. _________________________________
FULL

HIST 1300-H01 Western Civilization I                                     (CRN# 29444)                 Prof. J. Brink                  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

This is a survey of Western Civilization from prehistory to the Age of Louis XIV. It covers an ambitious span of time. The intellectual goal for this course is equally ambitious. In addition to understanding the place of history in the humanities, our purpose is to “know ourselves.” We shall examine the roots and development of western institutions, religions, economies, and cultures. We want to know the “who, what, when, where, how and why” of our mutual heritage. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENT.
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FULL

HIST 2301-H02      History of the US since 1877                    (CRN# 28390)                 Prof. R. Milam                MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

Note: You need not take HIST 2300 before taking HIST 2301.
This course will discuss, in an overview format, all of the main currents – political, economic, and social, etc. – of American history since 1877.  Of special interest will be such American turning points as the second  industrial revolution, imperialism, the two World Wars, the Great Depression, Viet Nam and the current political scene.  The course focuses on broad patterns and interpretations rather than a collection of independent facts.  Two elements especially distinguish this particular class: an emphasis on discussion over sometimes controversial issues and an awareness of current events, which are nothing more than a continuation of the American story through the present.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM AMERICAN HISTORY REQUIREMENT.

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FULL

HONS 1302-H02    Seminar in Healthcare                              (CRN# 20086)                 Prof. K. Dickson             T 4:00-6:50 PM
                                    SEMINAR                   

Note: Preference will be given to Honors freshmen and sophomores. Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course. Enrollment for this course is limited to Honors students only.
Time conflict note: Students enrolled in BIOL 1403 for the fall will be unable to take this course because of a time conflict between this course and the test time for BIOL 1403.
The Honors Seminar in Healthcare introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of healthcare professionals in the disciplines of medicine, nursing, allied health sciences, pharmacy, and research.  Healthcare professionals will provide insight into the roles and responsibilities of each discipline; current healthcare issues, emerging technologies, and ethical considerations; and requirements for application into related programs of study.  Students will have the unique opportunity to tour various facilities and meet faculty and professionals in practice. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS. *Lower-level seminars will not provide seminar credit for students who entered in and after fall of 2013.

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HONS 1303-H01     Geography, History, Culture, and Conflict        (CRN# 33462)         Prof. G. Elbow            MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.
Syria! Ukraine! Afghanistan! Iraq! Georgia! Chechnya! Central African Republic! Rwanda! Bosnia! Mexico! Democratic Republic of the Congo! Israel! These and many other countries and areas have suffered from conflict during the past half century or more. Can we identify any common factors that might lead to internal or external conflicts? Is there a causal pattern? While every situation has unique historical, geographical, and cultural factors that lead to conflicts, there are certain conditions that tend to lead toward them, and they are often rooted in the region’s history, geography, and cultures. This course will seek to identify these conditions and explore why and how they contribute to armed conflicts. We will also look at those cases where armed conflicts were averted to see if any factors can be identified that contributed to resolution of tensions before armed conflict emerged. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS AND 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS. *Lower-level seminars will not provide seminar credit for students who entered in and after fall of 2013.

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FULL

HONS 1304-H01 Zombie Culture: The Zombie in (CRN# 14920) Prof. R. Weiner M 6:00-8:50 PM
History, Film, Literature, Art, SEMINAR
and the Popular Imagination 

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements. The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.
The recent AMC television series The Walking Dead has become a runaway hit with audiences and the forthcoming film World War Z is highly anticipated. Films like Warm Bodies were sleeper hits appealing to today’s youth culture. Zombie films, literature, video games, comics, action figures, and artistic works have permeated our culture to such extents that one might say zombies are now considered mainstream. Like Frankenstein’s monster and the vampire, the zombie is firmly placed within modern popular culture. Zombies have become a metaphor for our post-9/11 anxiety in a world filled with chaos. The zombie is the ultimate nightmare preying on our fears in a society where the concept of safety is often illusionary. The scholarly study of zombies has exploded in the last decade. This course will examine the zombie in all its various forms with a focus on film, literature, and sequential art. We will also look at the zombies’ historical role in Haitian history and religion and throughout the world. We will discuss how zombies have evolved over time in film, literature, and sequential art as an icon of popular culture. This course will try to answer the question of why zombies continue to be popular and how the artistic renderings in film, sequential art, and literature changed over time. Can the zombie teach us anything about the world we live in and our social responsibilities within it? As a class, we will try to define what constitutes a zombie? Please note this course will be reading and writing intensive and contain mature subject matter. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM CREATIVE ARTS AND 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS. *Lower-level seminars will not provide seminar credit for students who entered in and after fall of 2013.

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FULL

HONS 2314-H01     Europe and Its Cinema                         (CRN# 24737)                     Prof. C. Bradatan          T 6:00-8:50 PM
                                                                                                           SEMINAR

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.
This interdisciplinary seminar proposes an introduction to the study of the European culture through the masterpieces of its cinema. We will look at some of the most significant social, political, cultural and intellectual developments in 20th and 21st century Europe as seen through works by major European directors: Serguei Eisenstein, Jean Renoir, Vittorio de Sica, Andrei Tarkovsky, Luis Buñuel, Ingmar Bergman, Roberto Rosselini, Emir Kusturica, and others. Consistent with the Honors College’s philosophy, we will consider their films interdisciplinarily: both aesthetically, as works of art in and for themselves, but also as “windows” (distorting and enriching at the same time) through which we can have access to the world that these works come from, to their social, political, intellectual and artistic contexts. Such masterpieces testify to the immense richness and complexity of cinema as a medium: an art film always reveals itself as work of art, but it also speaks of wars and revolutions, anxieties and phantasms, major social upheavals, new philosophical ideas and artistic avant-gardes, scientific discoveries and paradigm shifts. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM CREATIVE ARTS AND 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS. *Lower-level seminars will not provide seminar credit for students who entered in and after fall of 2013.

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FULL

HONS 3300-H01    Individual Honors Research                     Contact: Lori Lightfoot at lori.lightfoot@ttu.edu     

This course is only available to students that intend to write an Honors thesis and graduate with Highest Honors.
An Honors thesis is a lengthy, research-based paper based on original research that conforms to the publishing standards of journals in your chosen field. Honors 3300 is a research and writing lab in which you will master the core skills necessary to draft a thesis. Before you even begin this class, you will have identified a broad thesis topic and a thesis director in your major discipline. Your thesis director will guide you in the original research and academic content of your thesis, and your Honors 3300 professor will serve as your writing coach. Using feedback from both your thesis director and your Honors 3300 professor, you will proceed through the steps of writing a thesis, from idea brainstorming to constructing a full rough draft. Specifically, in this course, you will master the following skills: writing proposals; research strategies; note-taking; effective outlining; integrating primary and secondary sources; constructing a literature review; formatting sections of your thesis; utilizing constructive feedback; and revising. You will do some writing most weeks, and you will be researching every week for the entire semester.  By the end of Honors 3300, you will have a rough, working draft of your thesis, which you will then revise into a polished, publishable product in Honors 4300 the following semester. Course content will vary to meet the needs of individual students who are working within different academic disciplines and who are at different stages of the research process.

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HONS 3301-H01    The Literature of Walking                        (CRN# 10461)                 Prof. K. Caswell             TR 9:30-10:50
SEMINAR & CAPSTONE

If you trust anthropologist Tim Ingold, wayfaring on foot is “the fundamental mode by which living beings inhabit the earth.” And walking, writes Merlin Coverley, “is to journey in the mind as much as on land: it is a deeply meditative practice.” For this reason, walking and reading, and walking and writing have a long and vibrant history. The list of writers who walk is long: Bruce Chatwin; William Wordsworth, and his sister, Dorothy; Soren Kierkegaard; Arthur Rimbaud; Henry David Thoreau; William Hazlitt; Rebecca Solnit; Coleridge, Clare, and Blake.

In this class, we’ll read, we’ll write, and we’ll walk. We’ll regard walking as an art, like writing, and discover how such a meditative act is an essential component of the writing process. Students will embark upon group and independent walking projects, and we’ll write critically and creatively about our reading, and about our personal experiences of walking. This course has reading, writing and walking intensive requirements. This course may be taken for Honors seminar credit, or capstone credit.

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FULL

HONS 3301-H02    Bridging the Gap Between the                 (CRN# 14946)                 Prof. K. Ketner               TR 9:30-10:50 AM
                                    Sciences and the Humanities                      SEMINAR

One often encounters the assumption that there is an overwhelming separation between the sciences and the arts/humanities. This seminar will consider that alleged division, and explore the hypothesis that the divide is an illusion. We will consider the possibility that these disciplines include unifying common features when viewed through the lens of interdisciplinary study of methods. Another feature of the seminar will be the opportunity to open a dialogue between these two grand aspects of human endeavor. For this semester, we will focus on the special topic of Literature of the First Century C.E. within the Eastern Mediterranean region, in the context of recent Historical and Manuscriptural discoveries (e.g., the Nag Hammadi library, the /Gospel of Thomas/, or the Dead Sea Scrolls). We will examine extracts from such texts, as well as from the works of scholars such as Pagels (Princeton U., /The Gnostic Gospels/), Eisenman (California State U. Long Beach, /James, the Brother of Jesus/), Philo of Alexandria (/On the Contemplative Life/), and Crossan (DePaul U., /The Historical Jesus/).
This course has writing intensive requirements.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

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HONS 3301-H03    Philosophical Filmmakers:                      (CRN# 14957)                 Prof. C. Bradatan          R 6:00-8:50 PM
                                    Bergman, Kurosawa, Kieslowski               SEMINAR

Should philosophy be the monopoly of “professional” philosophers alone? Can philosophical questions be raised, and answers attempted, through other means of expression than the traditional ones (i.e., academic books and journal articles)? If they can, and if, furthermore, “the medium is the message,” then how exactly does the adoption of non-conventional forms of expression (art cinema, for example) change the philosophical content itself? How do artists and thinkers, brought up in different cultures come to tackle the same set of “universally human” issues such as death, finitude, solitude, quest for meaning? This interdisciplinary course seeks to answer such questions through an in-depth discussion of the oeuvres of three major 20th century filmmakers: Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007), Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) and Krzysztof Kieslowski (1941-1996). Films such as The Seventh Seal (1957) and Wild Strawberries (1957), by Bergman; Rashomon (1950) and Dersu Uzala (1975), by Kurosawa, Blind Chance (1981), and The Decalogue (1989-1990), by Krzysztof Kieslowski, have always struck viewers as intensely philosophical. We now have a chance to develop this perception into a more articulated understanding. For this purpose, we will be using not only scholarly literature dedicated to these films and directors, but also works of philosophy and literature by such authors as Nietzsche, Camus, Tolstoy, Unamuno, Rorty, Žižek and others. This course has writing intensive requirements. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.
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FULL

HONS 3301-H05    Africa’s Role in the                                    (CRN# 14968)                 Prof. T. Nagy                  W 2:00-4:50 PM
                                    Contemporary World                                    SEMINAR

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.
Africa is the continent least understood by Americans; it is often presented by the media as a land of war, famine, and pestilence.  This course will present Africa's contemporary reality – the positive as well as the negative – by examining major current issues after briefly surveying Africa's history, geography, societies, and culture.  Themes covered will include: political dynamics; regional conflicts; human rights and women's issues; economic development and poverty (including the role played by international assistance); involvement of external forces and globalization; refugees and migration; and environmental and public health crisis (including HIV/AIDS).  The course will also examine Africa's role in current U.S. global policy priorities, including US security concerns.  The required texts are: Understanding Contemporary Africa (edited by April and Donald Gordon); Things Fall Apart (Chinua Achebe); and supplemental articles designated by the instructor and available in a compendium. This course has writing intensive requirements. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

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FULL

HONS 3302-H02    Early Clinical Experience                        (CRN# 29877)                 Prof. L. Johnson             MW 1:00-1:50 PM
                                                                                                               SEMINAR                                                                 W 2:00-4:50PM

Note: Application to take this course is mandatory.  Enrollment is limited to Honors students only.  Eligible students must have junior standing by hours or be May/August/December 2016 TTU graduates (as shown on the Tech system) with steady progress made toward completion of medical school science requirements. Students must submit to a criminal background check and will need to pass a TB test prior to entry in the class. Applicationto take this course is required and should be submitted to sarah.timmons@ttu.edu by 8pm on Friday, March 28, 2014.

This course block provides the framework for Pre-Med students to learn the fundamental concepts of the various roles and responsibilities of physicians. Learning occurs in several settings including classroom instruction, small group forums, and clinical settings.   The students also explore ethical, cultural, psychological, and economic dimensions of clinical care through these various learning settings. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.
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FULL

HONS 3304-H01    The Performing Arts as Social                 (CRN# 15019)                 Prof. A. Duffy                 MW 2:00-3:20
                                    And Political Statement                               SEMINAR

The Arts as Social and Political Statement will focus on the impact of the arts on American society from  the early 1900s to present day. A sweeping introduction to specific works that have drawn controversy, asked questions, and opened minds will be included. We will look mostly at performance art, dance, and visual art as catalysts for social and political expression. Specific artists studied will include Pablo Picasso, Karen Finley, Bill T. Jones, Martha Graham, and Robert Mapplethorpe among others. We will ask questions of the artists and of each other in effort to determine art’s position in society, and whether it truly promotes effectual change. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.
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HONS 3304-H03    Music and Your Mind                                (CRN# 24735)                 Prof. P. Martens             MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
                                                                                                               SEMINAR

When Ali G asked Donald Trump “What is the most popular thing in the world?” his one-word answer was “Music.” Trump was correct in thinking that music is, and always has been, pervasive in human culture.  Moreover, there are few individuals who lack a strong connection to something musical, be it a favorite band, a meaningful song, or a melody that we hope to never hear again.  This course will introduce students to the social, physiological, and psychological reasons behind these connections, shuttling back and forth between the universal and personal manifestations of music and our minds. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.
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HONS 4300-H01    Individual Honors Research          Contact: Lori Lightfoot at lori.lightfoot@ttu.edu  

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors College and approved Honors thesis/project application on file.
Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.  Independent work under the individual guidance of a faculty member, who must be either a member of the graduate faculty or approved by the Honors Dean.

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FULL

HONS 4301-H01    Torts Law (LAW 5404)                             (CRN# 24624)                 Prof. R. Rosen                 MTWR 10:00-10:50 AM
SEMINAR

Note: This course is cross-listed with TTU Law School Course LAW 5404. Student evaluation will be based upon a final examination administered at the end of the semester.  Application to take this course is required and should be submitted to sarah.timmons@ttu.edu by 8pm, Friday, March 28, 2014. Enrollment is limited to Honors students only. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis for undergraduate students.
Introduction to standards and principles governing legal liability for intentional and unintentional invasions of interests of personality and property. Students receiving a grade of C+ or better in the course who later matriculate at the Texas Tech University School of Law may not be required to repeat the course if approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs when another course or courses are available in the same subject area which may be taken in substitution for equivalent credit hours which will then be a part of such student’s required first-year curriculum.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

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FULL

HONS 4301-H03    Contracts Law (LAW 5402)                     (CRN# 28796)                 Prof. B. Shannon            MTWR 9:00-9:50 AM
SEMINAR

Note: This course is cross-listed with TTU Law School Course LAW 5402. Student evaluation will be based upon a final examination administered at the end of the semester.  Application to take this course is required and should be submitted to sarah.timmons@ttu.edu by 8pm, Friday, March 28, 2014. Enrollment is limited to Honors students only. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis for undergraduate students.
A study of the enforceability of promises, the creation of contractual obligations, performance and breach, the impact of the contract on the legal relationships of nonparties, and the examination of contract doctrine in three settings: personal services, sales of goods, and construction contracts. Students receiving a grade of C+ or better in the course who later matriculate at the Texas Tech University School of Law may not be required to repeat the course if approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs when another course or courses are available in the same subject area which may be taken in substitution for equivalent credit hours which will then be a part of such student’s required first-year curriculum.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

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HUM 2301-H01      The Western Intellectual Tradition:       (CRN# 15030)                 Prof. C. Bradatan          R 3:00- 5:50 PM
                                    Beginnings to Renaissance                         SEMINAR

Note: Non-Honors students requesting to enroll in HUM 2301 must contact Professor Brink for approval before receiving a permit to enroll.
Why is a given literary, philosophical or artistic work considered “novel,” “innovative” or “revolutionary”? How is it that the new appears against a certain intellectual background? To what extent is novelty an “objective” characteristic, intrinsic to the work itself and to what extent is it the result of its interaction with the intellectual/artistic environment within which it emerges? What roles do extraneous factors (such as competition and demands of the market, political pressure/sponsorship, ideological and religious censorship) play in the genesis of novelty? What are the major patterns of intellectual and artistic change in the West? These are some of the questions that we will be addressing in the class. The seminar is an introduction to the Western humanities from Antiquity to Renaissance, with a special emphasis on the issues of novelty, originality, “paradigm shift,” and intellectual change. The course proposes a close look at some of the intense “knots” of novelty, first of all in philosophy and literature, but also in the arts, with the aim of bringing about a better understanding of how cultural history works, what the main “patterns of change” in the Western tradition are, how originality is possible, and how the new is produced. This course has writing intensive requirements.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY, AND CULTURE REQUIREMENT AND 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS. *Lower-level seminars will not provide seminar credit for students who entered in and after fall of 2013.
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LIBR 1100-H01      Introduction to Library Research           (CRN# 18385)                 Prof. L. Heinz                 W 9:00-9:50 AM

Designed to introduce students to life-long information literacy skills and establish the tools for effective and efficient research in a university library.  Objectives are based on the ACRL Standards for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Honor students will be required to critically analyze and synthesize information resources to be included in an annotated bibliography and literature review on a topic of their choosing.  Case studies will be used in class to discuss issues of academic integrity and ethical use of information.
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MATH 1451-H01   Calculus I with Applications                   (CRN# 29411)                                                               TR 9:30-10:50 AM MATH 1451-H01   No-Credit Applications Lab                                                                                                             R 2:00-2:50 PM

Prerequisite: Score of 7 on Math Placement Exam; or score of 3 on the AP AB Calculus exam and a score of 5 on the MPE; or 660/29 on the Math section of the SAT/ACT; or MATH 1350 or 1550 with B- or better; or score of 5 on MPE and MATH 1321 with B- or better.
Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of the derivative, differentials, indefinite integrals, definite integrals.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

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FULL

MATH 1452-H01   Calculus II with Applications                  (CRN# 29573)                                                             MW 1:00-2:50 PM

Prerequisite: MATH 1451 with a grade of B- or better.
Methods of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions, and  applications.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.
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MATH 2360-H01   Linear Algebra                                            (CRN# 15055)                                                             TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 1452 with a grade of B- or better.
This course will involve a balance of theory, application and computation.  The many uses of linear algebra will be emphasized in conjunction with the philosophy that serious applications of linear algebra require some computing capability.  To this end the course will involve significant use of MATLAB.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions. 
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MATH 2450-H01   Calculus III with Applications                (CRN# 29409)                 Prof. L. Juan                   TR 12:30-1:50 PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                    R 2:00-2:50 PM

Prerequisite: MATH 1452 with a grade of B- or better.
Partial differentiation; functions of several variables; multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes Theorem.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics. 

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MATH 3350-H01   Higher Math for Engineers                      (CRN# 21206)                 Prof. E. Allen                  MWF 10:00-10:50 AM                 And Scientists

Note: This course is open to Math minors, but does not fulfill degree requirements for Math majors.
Prerequisite: MATH 2450 with a grade of B- or better.
Ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, and other selected topics.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions. 
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MATH 4000-H01   Creative Mathematics                             (CRN# 33561)                 Prof. C. Seaquist             TR 9:30-10:50 AM
                                                                                                               SEMINAR

Note: Preference will be given to Honors freshmen and sophomores. Upperclassmen will be placed on a waitlist until mid-July, when available spots will be opened.  MATH 4000 may substitute for anything above MATH 2360 for Math minor per department.
Corequisite: MATH 1451 with a grade of B- or better or consent of instructor.
This course will provide an environment in which to create mathematics. Specifically it will help students learn to make and criticize mathematical arguments and counter examples. In the process students will be learning about properties of the real numbers, which form the theoretical foundation for the calculus. The only intellectual requirement for this course is a desire and willingness to think and to share mathematical ideas. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.
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MATH 4000-H02   Introduction to Set Theory                       (CRN# 30915)                 Prof. R. Byerly               MWF 9:00-9:50 AM
                                                                                                               SEMINAR

Note: MATH 4000 may substitute for anything above MATH 2360 for Math minor per department.
Prerequisite: MATH 1451 with a grade of B- or better or consent of instructor.
What is a set? The set of all students at Texas Tech? The set of all good students at Texas Tech? The set of all students who are not in a set? The set of all sets? In the 19th century mathematicians realized that they operated with the objects “set” and “member of a set” without any precise definition what these objects are supposed to be. This led to a deep crisis which was ultimately resolved by the works of many great mathematicians like Cantor, Cohen, Fraenkel, Gödel, Russell, Zermelo, and many more. The idea of this course is first of all to recreate this crisis in class. Once we know that we do not know what a set is, we can start from scratch. Apart from being a highly nontrivial piece of mathematics and a beautiful area, Set Theory is related to Discrete Mathematics and Digital Computing. Furthermore, Set Theory is an area at the border of Mathematics and Philosophy. So, students majoring in philosophy or law areas or who are interested in PHIL 2310 (Logic) and PHIL 4310 (Advanced Logic) would certainly profit from his course.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.
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FULL

ME 2301- H01         Statics                                                           (CRN# 24854)                 Prof. J. Hanson               MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

Prerequisites: MATH 1452 and PHYS 1408.
The Mechanical Engineering discipline may be broadly divided into two fundamental topical areas: thermal sciences (thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer) and mechanical sciences (statics, solid mechanics, and dynamics).  Statics is the introductory course for the mechanical sciences.  Course topics include the fundamental principles and analysis procedures for particles, rigid bodies, and systems of rigid bodies in static equilibrium and an introduction to solid mechanics or the determination of stresses and deformations in bodies in static equilibrium. Honors Engineering Mechanics I also includes an introduction to the numerical methods of structural analysis.  Although this course is designed for engineering majors, it is also appropriate for non-majors with a potential interest in engineering or a general interest in technological topics.

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MGT 3370-H01      Organizational Management                   (CRN# 30889)                 Prof. W. Gardner           T 3:30-5:50 PM Prerequisite: Only students with a declared Business major or BAUD classification and a cumulative 3.0 Tech GPA may take this course.
Organization and Management serves as an introduction to the field of management, providing an overview of the major management functions – planning, organizing, leading and controlling.  This is an engaging, challenging course that focuses on how organizations: 1) set goals and establish plans to reach them; 2) divide work and organize to achieve strategic and operational goals; 3) lead members toward goal attainment through motivation, communication, and group processes; and 4) monitor and control performance to ensure task completion and take corrective action when necessary.  A classroom -as-organization pedagogy will be applied whereby students work in teams and practice shared leadership to complete case analyses, experiential exercises, and oral presentations.  Thus, experiential learning is achieved as students apply management principles in a team setting to complete course assignments.  This course is taught using active learning and experiential techniques and is primarily di8scussion-based, but also has written components.  Critical thinking skills are required for the experiential exercises and case analyses and will be enhanced during this course.
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MGT 4380-H01      Strategic Management                              (CRN# 15064)                 Prof. C. Duran                W 3:00-5:50 PM

Prerequisites: Only business students who have completed BLAW 3391, ISQS 3344, FIN 3320, MKT 3350, MGT 3370, and MGT 3373 with grades of C or higher and are in their final semester.  No COBA classifications permitted.
Strategic Management is the capstone, integrative course for graduating business administration students. This is an exciting, challenging course that focuses on how firms formulate, implement, and evaluate strategies. Students use all the knowledge and concepts acquired from prior business courses, integrate them with new strategic-management techniques, and use them to chart the future direction of different organizations. The major responsibility of students in this course is to make objective strategic decisions and to justify them through oral presentations and written case studies. This course is taught using active learning and experiential techniques and is primarily discussion-based, but also has written components. Critical thinking skills are required for the experiential exercises and case analyses and will be enhanced during this course. This Honors course periodically contains a service learning experience and case. Service learning is an active learning technique that combines application of course concepts, interaction with a community partner, and reflective components. The students will have the chance to apply the strategic management concepts learned in this course in a real world setting.
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FULL

MKT 3350-H01          Introduction to Marketing                   (CRN# 24601)                 Prof. J. Harper               MWF 1:00-1:50 PM

Prerequisite: ECO 2301 or AAEC 2305 or ECO 2305
The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the discipline of marketing, both as a philosophy of business and as a series of business practices. The course will explore the field of marketing, as it directs the organization’s resources to satisfy customers’ wants and needs through the exchange process, at a reasonable profit to the organization. Specifically, we will examine how marketers: understand consumers’ needs and wants; develop products and services that provide superior value; and how they price, distribute, and promote products and services effectively, both domestically and internationally. The course will direct your study of the organization (either a profit-oriented firm or a non-profit organization) as a market entity existing in a competitive environment. The emphasis will be on understanding the importance of quality, value, and customer relationship management in obtaining a competitive advantage in today’s marketplace. In addition, we will consider the ethical and societal issues related to marketing. The course will emphasize service learning where you will work with a real client organization to solve marketing problems through research and analysis.

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FULL

PHYS 1408-H01     Principles of Physics I                               (CRN# 29511)                 TBA                    MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
PHYS 1408-H51     Principles of Physics I Lab                       (CRN# 18087)                 Staff                   F 2:00-3:50 PM
PHYS 1408-751      Principles of Physics I Recitation           (CRN# 28218)                 Staff                  M 3:00-3:50 PM

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.
Prerequisite:  MATH 1451
Corequisites:  PHYS 1408-H51 Lab and PHYS 1408-751 Recitation
Calculus-based introductory physics course. Mechanics, kinematics, energy, momentum, gravitation, waves, and thermodynamics.
The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT.

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FULL

PHYS 2401-H01     Principles of Physics II                              (CRN# 22775)                 TBA                      MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
PHYS 2401-H51     Principles of Physics II Lab                     (CRN# 22776)                 Staff                      W 2:00-3:50 PM

PHYS 2401-751      Principles of Physics I Recitation           (CRN# 30050)                 Staff                    R 3:00-3:50 PM

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.
Prerequisites: PHYS 1408 and MATH 1452
Corequisite: PHYS 2401-H51 Lab and PHYS 2401-751 Recitation
Calculus-based introductory physics. Electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and optics. The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT.

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FULL

POLS 2302-H01     American Public Policy                            (CRN# 15077)                Prof. M. Rybalko          MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Note: You need not take POLS 1301 and 2302 in any particular order.
The objective of a social and behavioral science component of a core curriculum is to increase the student’s knowledge of how social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions, events, and ideas. Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity. After completing this course, students will be able to: 1) Describe the essential elements of public policy; 2) Explain how American political institutions affect the development and implementation of public policy; 3) Analyze the impact of constitutional law on public policy; 4) Explain how we analyze the effectiveness of public policy; 5) Describe and explain the effects of the US and Texas constitutions on public policy; 6) Describe connections between international forces and US domestic policy.  Additionally, a further objective for the course will be to increase students’ ability to think critically in the evaluation of policy issues as they participate in increased levels of interaction with their colleagues in the unique environment that such Honors courses offer. Through debate, dialogue, and interaction with each other the students should develop strategic learning skills to help them in meeting both the requirements of the course and achieving their broader education goals.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM POLITICAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

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FULL

POLS 2302-H02      American Public Policy                           (CRN #15080)                Prof. T. Meredith         TR 11-12:20 PM

Note: You need not take POLS 1301 and 2302 in any particular order.
The objective of a social and behavioral science component of a core curriculum is to increase the student’s knowledge of how social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions, events, and ideas. Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity. After completing this course, students will be able to: 1) Describe the essential elements of public policy; 2) Explain how American political institutions affect the development and implementation of public policy; 3) Analyze the impact of constitutional law on public policy; 4) Explain how we analyze the effectiveness of public policy; 5) Describe and explain the effects of the US and Texas constitutions on public policy; 6) Describe connections between international forces and US domestic policy.  Additionally, a further objective for the course will be to increase students’ ability to think critically in the evaluation of policy issues as they participate in increased levels of interaction with their colleagues in the unique environment that such Honors courses offer. Through debate, dialogue, and interaction with each other the students should develop strategic learning skills to help them in meeting both the requirements of the course and achieving their broader education goals.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM POLITICAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

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FULL

SPAN 1507-H01     Comprehensive Spanish Review              (CRN# 10908)                 Prof. J. McNutt               MWF 12:00-12:50 Prerequisite: two years of high school Spanish
A comprehensive one-semester review.

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FULL

SPAN 2301-H01     Second Course in Spanish I                      (CRN# 10942)                 Prof. J. McNutt               TR 9:30-10:50 AM This course emphasizes listening, reading, written and oral skills in order to develop students' communicative competence. In addition, this course will place significant stress on the development of students' intercultural competence through reading texts and written assignments.  The development of all of these crucial skills are integrated in a highly interactive and fun environment in which students practice and improve their Spanish every day.

FALL 2014 HONORS SEMINARS

EVHM 2302-H01           The Literature of Place  W 2:00-4:50 PM

EVHM 3300- H01          Writing in the Natural World  TR 12:30-1:50 PM

EVHM 3305-H01           Ecology  MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

HONS 1302-H02             Honors Seminar in Healthcare  TR 4:00-6:50

HONS 1304-H01             Zombie Culture: The Zombie in History, Film, Literature, Art and the Popular Imagination  (Creative Arts Credit)   M 6:00-8:50 PM

HONS 2314-H01             Europe and Its Cinema (Creative Arts Credit Credit)  T 6:00-8:50 PM

HONS 3301-H01             The Literature of Walking  TR 9:30-10:50 AM

HONS 3301-H02             Bridging the Gap Between the Sciences and Humanities    TR 9:30-10:50 AM

HONS 3301-H03             Philosophical Filmmakers   R 6:00-8:50 PM

HONS 3301-H05             Africa’s Role in the Contemporary World   W 2:00-4:50 PM

HONS 3302-H02            Early Clinical Experience   MW 1:00-1:50 PM, W 2:00-4:50 PM

HONS 3304-H01             The Performing Arts as Social & Political Statement   MW 2:00- 3:20 PM

HONS 3304-H03             Music and Your Mind  MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

HONS 4301-H01             Torts Law  MTWR 10:00- 10:50 AM

HONS 4301-H01             Contracts Law  MTWR 9:00-9:50 AM

HUM 2301-H01              The Western Intellectual Tradition: Beginnings to Renaissance (Language, Philosophy, and Culture Credit)            TR 2:00-3:20 PM

MATH 4000-H01           Creative Mathematics    TR 9:30-10:50 AM

MATH 4000-H02           Introduction to Set Theory    MWF 9:00-9:50 PM