Texas Tech University

Long-Term Exhibitions

buffalo sculpture in bronze

The Diamond M Gallery Wing

The Diamond M Galleries showcase the collection of the late Clarence Thurston and Evelyn Claire Littleton McLaughlin.

One of the Diamond M galleries focuses on a large collection of leading western artists. A second gallery focuses on the works of N.C. Wyeth, a leading illustrator of the late 19th and 20th centuries. Wyeth created the illustrations for the classic books Treasure Island, Last of the Mohicans, and dozens of others. Copies of these books are also available in the gallery. He also did illustrations for major magazines of the time.

See the Gallery Guide

 

Beyond Expressions In Clay
beyond expressions clay figureWilliam C. and Evelyn M. Davies
Gallery of Southwest Indian Art

The William C. and Evelyn M. Davies Gallery of Southwest Indian Art displays an extensive collection of Southwest Native American pottery and textile. The collection is owned by the Davies and  represents about 20 different Native American tribes. The rugs represent specific patterns and styles of the individual tribes. Each rug is hand woven.

The pottery of the Native American tribes includes a variety of utilitarian as well as ceremonial and trade vessels. A number of Storytellers, such as the one at right, are included in the collection.

 See the Gallery Guide

 

Changing Worlds: Dinosaurs, Diversity,
and Drifting Continents 

four dinosaur skulls

Changing Worlds looks at dinosaurs of different types, offers theories about how the earth was formed, how dinosaurs developed and eventually disappeared.

The exhibit features the work of the Museum's own internationally known paleontologist Dr. Sankar Chatterjee – whose work seems to established that today's birds were likely yesterday's dinosaurs. Most scientists believe birds evolved during the Jurassic time. But Dr. Chatterjee has discovered Protoavis – it's about a 210 million year old – much older than other scientists think birds developed.

See the Gallery Guide

 

AZ-NM-TX – 20th and 21st Century Art in
Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona
Talkington Gallery of Art

hippo head plus metal home sculpture

The Talkington Gallery of Art combines works from the Museum's collection with a significant donation from Margaret and J.T. Talkington, long-time Lubbock business and civic leaders. The gallery features selections from 20th and 21st Century art of the Southwestern United States. This art reflects the people and landscapes of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and portions of Colorado and Utah.

No particular type of landscape represents the Southwest, and no singular art style defines it. The art works on exhibit sample many divergent paths that artists from the Southwest have followed, from realism to romanticism, from impressionism to expressionism, from minimalism to conceptualism, and more.

See the Gallery Guide

 

Ice Age On the Southern Plains

mammoth skull

This gallery features prehistoric megafauna from the Pleistocene Period such as mammoths, saber-toothed cats, giant camels, short-faced bears, and dire wolves. This exhibition is from the Museum's collections and reflects the local area's distant natural history as revealed by ongoing research activities of the Museum and the Lubbock Lake Landmark.

 

 

The Remnant Trust

remnant trust logo

A new partnership between Texas Tech University and The Remnant Trust, Inc. brings a collection of original, first edition, and rare early written works to display at the Museum. These works are intended to inspire an elevated public understanding of individual liberty and human dignity through hands-on availability of the world's great ideas in original form. The Remnant Trust, Inc. will maintain a permanent presence in the Museum.

A new display will open February 29 with works that explore the relationship between economics and political freedom. The main collection of The Remnant Trust, Inc. is housed on the Texas Tech campus in the Southwest Collection/ Special Collections Library.

The Remnant Trust, Inc. website

Notice: some galleries may be temporarily closed without notice due to the Life Safety Project.

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Museum of Texas Tech University