Department of Electrical
and Computer Engineering

Professor Jon G. Bredeson, Chairperson.

Horn Professors Hagler, and Kristiansen; Horn and Maddox Professor Temkin; Professors Chao, Krile, Krompholz, Mitra, O'Hair, Parten, Portnoy, Trost, and Vines; Associate Professors Baker, Giesselmann, Mehrl, and Zieher; Assistant Professors Dallas, Dickens, Neuber, and Sari-Sarraf; Visiting Professor Maqusi; Adjunct Faculty: Kachru, Petrosian, Rowe, Shieh, Shurmer, and Van Wyk.

This department supervises the following degree programs: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING, Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, Doctor of Philosophy; COMPUTER ENGINEERING, Bachelor of Science.

Educational Objectives. The mission of Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center is to provide the highest standard of excellence in higher education, while pursuing continuous quality improvement, stimulating the greatest degree of meaningful research, and supporting faculty and staff in satisfying those whom we serve. The Department of Electrical Engineering supports the mission of the university through its undergraduate programs by providing students with appropriate curricula and educational experiences. The curricula remain current through continuing assessment by employers, alumni, faculty, and students. The current electrical engineering curriculum includes circuits and systems, electronics, electromagnetics, communications, digital systems, microcontrollers, programming, control systems, a number of electrical engineering specialty areas, and a number of technical and nontechnical support courses. Students obtain a broad education necessary to understand the impact of electrical engineering solutions in a global, societal, and environmental context. To accomplish the mission, the electrical engineering faculty, with advice from students, alumni, and employers, endorse the following objectives:

a) Students will obtain an ability to analyze and solve electrical engineering problems by applying fundamental knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. Modern engineering techniques, skills, and tools will be used, particularly recognizing the role that computers play in engineering.

b) Students will obtain an ability to identify, formulate, and solve practical electrical engineering problems. The current electrical engineering curriculum includes circuits and systems, electronics, electromagnetics, communications, digital systems, microcontrollers, programming, control systems, a number of electrical engineering specialty areas, and a number of technical and nontechnical support courses. Most of this is accomplished through the required lecture courses indicated in the curriculum.

c) Students will obtain an ability to identify, formulate, and solve practical electrical engineering problems including the planning, specification, design, implementation, and operation of systems, components, and/or processes that meet performance, cost, time, safety, and quality requirements.

d) Students will obtain an ability to design and conduct scientific and engineering experiments, and to analyze and interpret the resulting data. All undergraduate engineering programs provide for design experience, as described in objectives c and d. However, the approach used to provide the experience varies considerably at different institutions. The electrical engineering program at Texas Tech utilizes five 3 hour credit, stand -alone, project design laboratories to achieve this objective. The projects are long-term (no more than two per semester), open-ended, and team-oriented.

e) Students will recognize the need for, and ability to engage in, perpetual learning by working on projects for which they have no prior experience. They will develop their ability to learn by working both individually and within multidisciplinary teams. One of the objectives of the laboratory program at Texas Tech is to expose students to areas they have not seen before. It is important for students to develop confidence in their basic knowledge and to realize that they can extend that knowledge to new and exciting areas. In addition, it is important for students to begin the transition to life long learning and to not be afraid of something they haven't seen in a class. Engineers are seldom asked to solve problems that have already been solved. In industry, engineers are constantly asked to learn and develop new techniques and systems for which they may have little prior experience.

f) Students will obtain an ability to function and communicate effectively, both individually and within multidisciplinary teams. Another major objective of the electrical engineering laboratory program is to develop, in each student, a strong, fundamental capability in oral and written communication. In line with this, the majority of time spent in weekly meetings is devoted to student presentations.

A number of other areas are very important for practicing, professional engineers. Specific objectives are:

g) Students will experience professional and ethical responsibility through interaction with other students, faculty, and practicing professionals.

h) The program will promote cultural diversity within the ranks of the profession by encouraging minority and women students and faculty.

In addition, the field of computer engineering is very broad and includes a number of specialty areas. To allow for students to become more familiar with these areas:

I) The program will offer a wide range of technical specialties, consistent with the breadth of electrical engineering, including recent developments in the field.

An important contribution to accomplish these objectives is our five course sequence of stand-alone project laboratory courses.

In each of the project laboratory courses, students are given a brief description of a complex, open-ended project. The students, usually working in teams, are required to design, develop, construct, and evaluate a system to satisfy the requirements for the project. Faculty advisors evaluate the project on the basis of finished products, required written reports, and oral presentations. By its very structure the project laboratory sequence gives our students considerable experience in dealing with open ended design problems. They also gain experience in working closely with others and in written and oral communication.

The material presented in the electrical and computer engineering lecture courses is incorporated in the project laboratory course sequence. The projects, however, are real world problems that require the students to go beyond the basic knowledge learned in the classroom. Through these experiences, the students gain the technical maturity necessary to succeed in their chosen career. In addition, the project laboratory courses address topics in engineering ethics and professionalism and help the students to develop the skills needed for life-long learning.

The result of the overall curriculum is to prepare a graduate who is sensitive to the consequences of his or her work, both ethically and professionally, for a productive professional career. A broad educational background has been incorporated into this curriculum and personalized advising plays an important role in its implementation. The required undergraduate program is contained in the curriculum table shown below.

Our undergraduate curriculum gives students a broad education in electrical and computer engineering, and will enable them to pursue all career options in our fast changing technical environment. In addition, students may select from a wide variety of elective course in electrical engineering and other related disciplines allowing them to specialize at the senior level. If a student wishes, specific specialization options are available which include electronics, power, signals and systems, communications, optoelectronics, and electro-mechanical systems.

Students will be responsible for arranging a course of study with an advisor's counsel and approval. Students whose high school courses include physics, chemistry, mathematics through analytical geometry, and at least two credits for a single foreign language are expected to follow the sequence of courses shown in the curriculum. However, students who lack credits in any of these areas of study in high school should consult with departmental advisors to determine a suitably adjusted first year schedule. The exceptionally well-prepared student should consult the section of this catalog on credit by examination. All students must satisfy the academic performance requirements of the Dynamic Enrollment Management Plan (DEMP), copies of which are available from the Department of Electrical Engineering. Any exception requires written approval by the chairperson of the department. Successful students in the department will meet all prerequisite requirements with grades of C or better. After grades are posted for the current semester, students who have not met prerequisite requirements for any course will be dropped from that course by the department. It will be the responsibility of the student to add additional courses to maintain a full load. Students who have not achieved a C or better after a maximum of two attempts (including withdrawals) in a course must reapply for admission to the program. A faculty committee determined by the department will review individual cases of students requesting readmission to the department. Required courses taken more than twice will not apply toward the degree without PRIOR written approval by the department. It is the responsibility of the student to seek written permission. Any student within nine semester hours of graduation may take courses for graduate credit. Students interested in a dual degree program or a minor should consult a faculty advisor.

A minor in electrical engineering consists of EE 2304, 2331, 2372, 3303, 3311, and 3362.

Electrical Engineering Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 1351, Cal. I 3 MATH 1352, Cal. II 3
*CHEM 1307, Prin. of Chem. I 3 CS 1462, Fund. of Comp. Sci. I 4
CHEM 1107, Prin. of Chem. I (Lab.) 1 EE 2372, Mod. Dig. Syst. Des. 3
EE 1305, Intro. Engr. & Comp. Prog. 3 ENGL 1302, Adv. Coll. Rhetoric 3
POLS 1301, Amer. Govt., Org. 3 **Elective 3
ENGL 1301, Ess. Coll. Rhetoric 3 16
16
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 2350, Calculus III 3 MATH 3350, Math for Engr. I 3
EE 2304, Fund. of Elect. Engr. 3 EE 3311, Electronics I 3
PHYS 1308, Prin. of Phys. I 3 EE 2331, Proj. Lab. I 3
PHYS 1105, Prin. of Phys. I (Lab.) 1 PHYS 2301, Prin. of Phys. II 3
EE 3362, Engr. Appr. to Dig. Des. 3 PHYS 1106, Prin. of Phys. II (Lab.) 1
**Elective 3 EE 3303, Linear System Analysis 3
16 16
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
EE 3332, Proj. Lab. II 3 EE 3333, Proj. Lab. III 3
EE 3323, Prin. Comm. Sys. 3 EE 3342, Electromag. Theory II 3
EE 3341, Electromag. Theory I 3 EE 3353, Feedback Contr. Sys. 3
EE 3312, Electronics II 3 **Elective 6
**Elective 3 15
15
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
EE 4333, Senior Proj. Lab. IV 3 EE 4334, Proj. Lab. V 3
Elective (mathematics) 3 **Elective 15
**Elective 9 18
15

Minimum hours required for graduation 127.

*Students who do not have high school credit for chemistry or physics must take CHEM 1301 and/or PHYS 1304 before those listed.

**Choose from Core Curriculum requirements, plus 4 electrical engineering, and 2 other engineering.

Option courses include: (Choose three) ElectronicsEE 4314, 4321, 4324, 4382; powerEE 4316, 4343, 4345, 4391; signals and systemsEE 4364, 4367, 4368; communicationsEE 4323, 4325, 4342, 4360, 4361, optoelectronicsEE 4314, 4360, 4362, 4367; electromechanicalEE 4316, 4368, 4391, 4376, and a mechanical engineering elective.

Electrical Engineering Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 1351, Cal. I 3 MATH 1352, Cal. II 3
*CHEM 1307, Prin. of Chem. I 3 CS 1462, Fund. of Comp. Sci. I 4
CHEM 1107, Prin. of Chem. I (Lab.) 1 EE 2372, Mod. Dig. Syst. Des. 3
EE 1305, Intro. Engr. & Comp. Prog. 3 ENGL 1302, Adv. Coll. Rhetoric 3
POLS 1301, Amer. Govt., Org. 3 **Elective 3
ENGL 1301, Ess. Coll. Rhetoric 3 16
16
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 2350, Calculus III 3 MATH 3350, Math for Engr. I 3
EE 2304, Fund. of Elect. Engr. 3 EE 3311, Electronics I 3
PHYS 1308, Prin. of Phys. I 3 EE 2331, Proj. Lab. I 3
PHYS 1105, Prin. of Phys. I (Lab.) 1 PHYS 2301, Prin. of Phys. II 3
EE 3362, Engr. Appr. to Dig. Des. 3 PHYS 1106, Prin. of Phys. II (Lab.) 1
**Elective 3 EE 3303, Linear System Analysis 3
16 16
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
EE 3332, Proj. Lab. II 3 EE 3333, Proj. Lab. III 3
EE 3323, Prin. Comm. Sys. 3 EE 3342, Electromag. Theory II 3
EE 3341, Electromag. Theory I 3 EE 3353, Feedback Contr. Sys. 3
EE 3312, Electronics II 3 **Elective 6
**Elective 3 15
15
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
EE 4333, Senior Proj. Lab. IV 3 EE 4334, Proj. Lab. V 3
Elective (mathematics) 3 **Elective 15
**Elective 9 18
15

Minimum hours required for graduation--127.

*Students who do not have high school credit for chemistry or physics must take CHEM 1301 and/or PHYS 1304 before those listed.

**Choose from Core Curriculum requirements, pages 94-105, plus 4 electrical engineering, and 2 other engineering.

Option courses include: Electronics--EE 4314, 4321, 4324, 4382; power--EE 4316, 4343, 4345, 4391; signals and systems--EE 4315, 4364, 4367, 4368; communications--EE 4323, 4325, 4342, 4360, 4361, optoelectronics--EE 4314, 4360, 4362, 4367; electromechanical--EE 4316, 4368, 4391, 4376, and a mechanical engineering elective.

Electrical Engineering-Computer Science Dual Degree Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 1351, Cal. I 3 MATH 1352, Cal. II 3
*CHEM 1307, Prin. of Chem. I 3 CS 1462, Fund. of Comp. Sci. I 4
CHEM 1107, Prin. of Chem. I (Lab.) 1 EE 2372, Mod. Dig. Syst. Des. 3
EE 1305, Intro. Engr. & Comp. Prog. 3 ENGL 1302, Adv. Coll. Rhetoric 3
POLS 1301, Amer. Govt., Org. 3 Elective 3
ENGL 1301, Ess. Coll. Rhetoric 3 16
16
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 2350, Calculus III 3 MATH 3350, Math for Engr. I 3
CS 1463, Fund. Comp. Sci. II 4 CS 2382, Disc. Struc. 3
EE 2304, Fund. of Elec. Engr. 3 EE 3303, Linear Syst. Analysis 3
EE 3362, Engr. Appr. to Dig. Des. 3 MATH 2360, Linear Algebra 3
13 PHYS 1308, Prin. of Phys. I 3
PHYS 1105, Prin. of Phys. I (Lab) 1
16
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
EE 2331, Proj. Lab. I 3 EE 3341, Electromag. Theory I 3
EE 3311, Electronics 3 EE 3323, Prin. Comm. Sys. 3
PHYS 2301, Prin. of Phys. II 3 EE 3312, Electronics II 3
PHYS 1106, Prin. of Phys. II (Lab) 1 CS 3461, Concepts Prog. Lang. 4
CS 2365, Software Eng. 3 **Elective 3
**Elective 3 16
16
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
Elective 3 EE 3353, Feedback Contr. Sys. 3
EE 3342, Electromag. Theory II 3 EE 3333, Proj. Lab. III 3
EE 3332, Proj. Lab. II 3 CS 3364, Des. & Anal. of Alg. 3
CS 3375, Machine Struc. & Org. 3 Elective 6
12 15
FIFTH YEAR
Fall Spring
EE 4333 Senior Proj. Lab. IV 3 EE 4334, Proj. Lab. V 3
CS 3352, Intro. Sys. Prog. 3 CS 4352, Operating Systems 3
**Elective 9 **Elective 6
15 12

Minimum hours required for graduation 147.

*Students who do not have high school credit for chemistry or physics must take CHEM 1301 and/or PHYS 1304 before those listed.

**Choose from Core Curriculum requirements, plus 1 electrical engineering, 1 computer science, and 1 technical elective.

Computer Engineering Educational Objectives. The mission of Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center is to provide the highest standard of excellence in higher education, while pursuing continuous quality improvement, stimulating the greatest degree of meaningful research, and supporting faculty and staff in satisfying those whom we serve. The Department of Electrical Engineering supports the mission of the university through its undergraduate programs by providing students with appropriate curricula and educational experiences. The curricula remain current through continuing assessment by employers, alumni, faculty, and students. The current computer engineering curriculum includes circuits and systems, electronics, software engineering, communications, digital systems, microcontrollers, programming, systems programming, operating systems, computer architecture, and a number of technical and nontechnical support courses. Students obtain a broad education necessary to understand the impact of computer engineering solutions in a global, societal, and environmental context. To accomplish the mission, the computer engineering faculty, with advice from students, alumni, and employers, endorse the following objectives:

a) Students will obtain an ability to analyze and solve computer engineering problems by applying fundamental knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. Modern engineering techniques, skills, and tools will be used, particularly recognizing the role that computers play in engineering.

b) Students will obtain an ability to identify, formulate, and solve practical computer engineering problems. The computer engineering problems specific to this program include the areas of circuits and systems, electronics, software engineering, communications, digital systems, microcontrollers, programming, systems programming, operating systems, and computer architecture. Most of this is accomplished through the required lecture courses indicated in the curriculum.

c) Students will obtain an ability to identify, formulate, and solve practical computer engineering problems including the planning, specification, design, implementation, and operation of systems, components, and/or processes that meet performance, cost, time, safety, and quality requirements.

d) Students will obtain an ability to design and conduct scientific and engineering experiments, and to analyze and interpret the resulting data. All undergraduate engineering programs provide for design experience, as described in objectives c and d. However, the approach used to provide the experience varies considerably at different institutions. The computer engineering program at Texas Tech utilizes five 3 hour credit, stand -alone, project design laboratories to achieve this objective. The projects are long-term (no more than two per semester), open-ended, and team-oriented.

e) Students will recognize the need for, and ability to engage in, perpetual learning by working on projects for which they have no prior experience. They will develop their ability to learn by working both individually and within multidisciplinary teams. One of the objectives of the laboratory program at Texas Tech is to expose students to areas they have not seen before. It is important for students to develop confidence in their basic knowledge and to realize that they can extend that knowledge to new and exciting areas. In addition, it is important for students to begin the transition to life long learning and to not be afraid of something they haven't seen in a class. Engineers are seldom asked to solve problems that have already been solved. In industry, engineers are constantly asked to learn and develop new techniques and systems for which they may have little prior experience.

f) Students will obtain an ability to function and communicate effectively, both individually and within multidisciplinary teams. Another major objective of the computer engineering laboratory program is to develop, in each student, a strong, fundamental capability in oral and written communication. In line with this, the majority of time spent in weekly meetings is devoted to student presentations.

A number of other areas are very important for practicing, professional engineers. Specific objectives are:

g) Students will experience professional and ethical responsibility through interaction with other students, faculty, and practicing professionals.

h) The program will promote cultural diversity within the ranks of the profession by encouraging minority and women students and faculty.

In addition, the field of computer engineering is very broad and includes a number of specialty areas. To allow for students to become more familiar with these areas:

I) The program will offer a wide range of technical specialties, consistent with the breadth of computer engineering, including recent developments in the field.

All computer engineering students will follow the guidelines written in the general department information.

Computer Engineering Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 1351, Cal. I 3 MATH 1352, Cal. II 3
*CHEM 1307, Prin. of Chem. I 3 CS 1462, Fund. of Comp. Sci. I 4
CHEM 1107, Prin. of Chem. I (Lab.) 1 EE 2372, Mod. Dig. Syst. Des. 3
EE 1305, Intro. Engr. & Comp. Prog. 3 ENGL 1302, Adv. Coll. Rhetoric 3
POLS 1301, Amer. Govt., Org. 3 *Elective 3
ENGL 1301, Ess. Coll. Rhetoric 3 16
16
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 2350, Calculus III 3 MATH 3350, Math for Engr. I 3
EE 2304, Fund. of Elect. Engr. 3 EE 3311, Electronics I 3
PHYS 1308, Prin. of Phys. I 3 EE 2331, Proj. Lab. I 3
PHYS 1105, Prin. of Phys. I (Lab.) 1 PHYS 2301, Prin. of Phys. II 3
EE 3362, Engr. Appr. to Dig. Des. 3 PHYS 1106, Prin. of Phys. II (Lab.) 1
C S 1463, Fund. Comp. Sci. II 4 EE 3303, Linear System Analysis 3
17 16
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
EE 3332, Proj. Lab. II 3 EE 3334, Comp. Eng. Proj. Lab. 3
EE 3323, Prin. Comm. Sys. 3 EE 3341, Electromag. Theory I 3
EE 3312, Electronics II 3 C S 2365, Software Engineering 3
C S 2382, Disc. Struct. 3 C S 3364, Des. & Anal. of Alog. 3
MATH 2360, Linear Algebra 3 *Elective 3
*Elective 3 *Elective 3
18 18
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
EE 4333, Senior Proj. Lab. IV 3 EE 4334, Proj. Lab. V 3
E E 4310, (4382) 3 E E 4375, Computer Arch. 3
C S 3352, Intr. Sys. Prog. 3 C S 4352, Operating Systems 3
*Elective 3 *Elective 3
*Elective 3 *Elective 3
15 15

Minimum hours required for graduation 131.

Students who do not have high school credit for chemistry or physics must take CHEM 1301 and/or PHYS 1304 before those listed.

*Choose from Core Curriculum requirements; One computer science elective from: CS 3368, 3461, 3383, 4354, or 4395; Two electrical engineering courses from: EE 4364, 4367, 4375, or 4382.

Courses in Electrical Engineering. (EE)

All prerequisite courses must be completed with a C or better.

Phase III requires equivalent completion of first 2 years of EE curriculum.

1305. Introduction to Engineering and Computer Programming (3:3:0). Corequisite: MATH 1351. An introduction to the fundamentals of electrical and computer engineering and its relation to science, mathematics, management, ethics, and society. Computing and structured programming.

2304. Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering (3:3:0). Corequisite: MATH 2350. Principles of electrical circuits and systems. DC, transient, and sinusoidal steady-state analysis. [ENGR 2305]

2331. Project Laboratory I (3:1:6). Corequisite: EE 3362. Corequisite: EE 3303 and 3311. A laboratory course to accompany second year basic courses in electrical or computer engineering.

2372. Modern Digital System Design (3:3:0). Corequisite: MATH 1352. An introduction to combinational and sequential digital systems.

3303. Linear System Analysis (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 2304. Corequisite: MATH 3350. Concepts of signal and system analysis in time and frequency domains as applied to electric circuits. LaPlace transform, Fourier series, and Fourier techniques are stressed.

3311. Electronics I (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 2304. Introduction to electronic devices, amplifiers, and electronic systems. Principles of electronic circuit design and analysis.

3312. Electronics II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3311 and 3303, Phase III standing in electrical or computer engineering. Integrated circuit amplifier design. Power and other special purpose amplifiers.

3323. Principles of Communication Systems (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3303, Phase III standing in electrical or computer engineering. Probability and random variables. Fourier transforms and linear systems concepts. Amplitude, phase angle, and pulse modulation communication systems.

3332. Project Laboratory II (3:1:6). Prerequisite: EE 2331, Phase III standing in electrical or computer engineering; corequisite: EE 3312 and 3323. A laboratory course to accompany third-year basic courses in electrical or computer engineering.

3333. Project Laboratory III (3:1:6). Prerequisite: EE 3332, Phase III standing in electrical engineering; corequisite: EE 3353. A laboratory course to accompany third-year basic courses in electrical engineering.

3334. Computer Engineering Project Laboratory (3:1:6). Prerequisite: E E 3332, CS 2365, and Phase III standing in electrical or computer engineering. A laboratory course to accompany third year basic courses in electrical or computer engineering.

3341. Electromagnetic Theory I (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3303 and PHYS 2301, Phase III standing in electrical or computer engineering. Vector analysis. Partial differential equations. General treatment of static, electric, and magnetic fields from the vector viewpoint.

3342. Electromagnetic Theory II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3341, Phase III standing in electrical engineering. General solutions for Maxwell's equations. Traveling waves in scalar media. Boundary conditions and constraints imposed by bounding surfaces.

3351. Energy Conversion I (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3323, and Phase III standing in electrical engineering. Principles of information theory, quantum mechanics, and statistics applied to thermal physics with applications to electrical engineering.

3353. Feedback Control Systems (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3312 and Phase III standing in electrical engineering. An introduction to the analysis and design of automatic control systems. Control system concepts. Controller design and digital control.

3362. Digital Design Using Microcontrollers (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 2372. Advanced digital systems design. Assembly language programming, interfacing, and applications of microcontrollers.

3388. Robotic Systems (3:3:0). Prerequisite: MATH 3350, PHYS 2301, and MATH 2360 or EE 3303. Base analytical techniques and fundamental principles of robotics. Including kinematics, dynamics, sensing, and control.

4314. Solid State Devices (3:3:0). Prerequisite: E E 3312 and 3341. Principles and properties of semiconductor devices and optical devices. Thyristors and other switches. Integrated circuit devices. Device modeling.

4316. Power Electronics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3353. Switch mode power conversion, power supplies, inverters, motor drives, power semiconductor devices, and magnetics. System analysis, design, and modeling.

4321. Applications of Analog Integrated Circuits (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3312, 3323. Principles involved in designing analog integrated circuits. Device physics, small signal, and large signal models. Biasing and basic circuit building blocks. Applications.

4323. Modern Communication Circuits (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3312, 3323. Analysis and design techniques for modern communication circuits.

4324. Computer-Aided Circuit Analysis (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3353. Development, implementation, and application of advanced circuit and system models for the design of integrated circuits. Designed to enhanced design skills through direct application of computer-aided analysis tools.

4325. Telecommunication Networks (3:3:0). Prerequisite: E E 3323. Networking and standards. Data and voice network architectures, cellular, satellite and telephone networks. Open network architecture, ISDN, transport and network layer protocols. Network modeling and optimization. Queuing theory.

4331. Special Problems in Electrical Engineering (3). Prerequisite: Approval of department chairperson. Individual studies in advanced engineering areas of special interest. May be repeated for credit.

4333. Project Laboratory IV (3:0:9). Prerequisite: EE 3333. A laboratory course to accompany fourth-year courses in electrical or computer engineering.

4334. Project Laboratory V (3:0:9). Prerequisite: EE 4333. A laboratory course to accompany fourth year courses in electrical or computer engineering.

4342. Microwave Solid-State Circuits (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3312 and 3342. Study of microwave electronics and design at the device and solid-state circuit level. Circuit design issues such as transistor-based amplifier design, noise, broadband, and high-power considerations, and microwave oscillators. Device topics to be included are special diodes, avalanche devices, and other active devices.

4343. Introduction to Power Systems (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3341. Electrical power transmission and distribution systems; power generation systems, system modeling, planning, management and protection.

4345. Pulsed Power (3:3:0). Prerequisite: E E 3342. Fundamentals of pulsed power circuits, components, and systems. Pulse forming lines, energy storage, voltage multipliers, switching, materials, grounding and shielding, measurements, and applications.

4353. Gaseous Electronics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: E E 3342. Kinetic theory of gases. Collisions. Emission processes. Self-sustained discharge. Paschen law. Glow discharge. Arc discharge. Streamers. Spark discharge. Corona discharge. Gas lasers.

4360. Fiber Optic Systems (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3312 and 3323. Optical fibers, couplers, sources, and detectors; applications to communications and sensing.

4361. Advanced Communication Systems (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3323. Information transmission in electronic systems. Random variables and stochastic processes, noise in analog and digital modulation systems, optimal receivers.

4362. Modern Optics for Engineers (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3323, 3342. Modern concepts in optics related to engineering applications. Geometrical, physical, and quantum optics; Fourier optics, holography, and image processing.

4364. Digital Signal Processing (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3323. An introduction to digital signal processing. Sampling, z-transform, discrete and fast Fourier transforms, flowgraphs, design techniques for digital filters, effects of finite word length, and applications.

4367. Image Processing (3:3:0). Prerequisite: E E 3323. Imaging fundamentals. Linear operators in both spatial-frequency domains. Image enhancement and restoration techniques. Analysis and coding of images.

4368. Advanced Control Systems (3:3:0). Prerequisite: E E 3353. Analysis and design of advanced control systems including optimal, nonlinear, multiple-input multiple-output, digital, fuzzy logic, and neural network control.

4375. Computer Architecture (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3362 and Phase III standing in electrical or computer engineering. An introduction to the architecture, organization, and design of microprocessors. Hardware design related to various microprocessors. Analysis of current microprocessors and applications.

4381. VLSI Processing (3:3:0). Prerequisite: PHYS 2301 and MATH 3350. Introduction to the physical principles, techniques, and technologies involved with the fabrication of very large scale integrated circuits (VLSI).

4382. Digital IC Analysis and Design (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EE 3312, 3362. Design of VLSI digital integrated circuits including basic device theory and processing technologies.

4391. Electric Machines and Drives (3:3:0). Prerequisite: E E 3353. Analysis and control of DC machines and induction machines. Space vector theory. Field oriented control. Modeling of machine and controller dynamics.


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