Department of Education, Nutrition,
and Restaurant-Hotel Management

Professor Lynn Huffman, Chairperson.

Professors Brittin, Couch, Felstehausen, and Spallholz; Associate Professors Boylan, Fox, Hoover, and Stout; Assistant Professors Adams, Blum, Dodd, March, Roman-Shriver, Sanchez, Shriver, and Wu; Instructor Goh.

This department supervises the following degree programs: FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES, Bachelor of Science in Family and Consumer Sciences; FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy; FOOD AND NUTRITION, Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy; RESTAURANT, HOTEL, AND INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT, Bachelor of Science and Master of Science. A 10-1/2-month post-baccalaureate clinical didactic internship, accredited by the American Dietetic Association (ADA), meets the ADA eligibility for dietetic registration.

Family and Consumer Sciences Program

The Family and Consumer Sciences program offers specialization in both family and consumer sciences teacher certification and family and consumer sciences. Each specialization provides a broad background in all family and consumer sciences subject areas and prepares students for a wide variety of career opportunities. Students take courses in human development, family financial planning, food and nutrition, housing and interior design, family studies, clothing construction, textiles, restaurant, hotel, and institutional management. The certification course work meets Texas requirements for teacher certification in family and consumer sciences.

Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Certification. The family and consumer sciences teacher certification program is designed for students planning teaching careers in junior high and high school family and consumer sciences, extension, adult and community-based education, educational support services such as curriculum development and media, business, government, human services, and other fields. The program includes course work in all family and consumer sciences content areas and the professional education courses required for teacher certification in Texas. See an academic advisor for current information.

Students seeking teacher certification must meet all requirements outlined in the Teacher Education section of this catalog. Admission requirements include completion of 60 semester hours with an overall grade-point average of 2.50 or better; and a satisfactory level of performance on the TASP test. Other requirements include a grade-point average of 2.50 or better in professional education courses and the teaching field, and a grade of C or better in all required specialization and support courses. To be recommended for certification, graduates must achieve a satisfactory level of performance on an examination prescribed by the State Board of Education (ExCET).

It is possible to become qualified to teach in a second teaching field by taking additional course work. Students also may earn a teaching certificate in family and consumer sciences as a part of a major in family studies. See the Human Development and Family Studies section.

Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Certification Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
FallSpring
IS 1100 & HUSC 1100 2ENGL 13023
ENGL 13013F&N 14104
*Mathematics3Oral Communication3
FCSE 21021POLS 23023
POLS 13013FADS 1303 3
FFP 1370 3EDIT 23183
I D 13803 19
18
SECOND YEAR
FallSpring
HIST 23003HIST 23013
English Literature3ENGL 23113
*Natural Lab. Science4*RHIM 34604
EDSE 23003*Math. or Logical Reasoning 3
FADS 23113*Visual & Performing Arts elective 3
16 16
THIRD YEAR
FallSpring
FCSE 33013FCSE 3103, 4302 4
F S 33203HUSC 32142
H D 3310 or HDFS 3331 3FFP 3325 3
F&N 23103H D 33133
H D 3312,3**EDSE 4310, 43226
Human Sciences elective 3 18
18
FOURTH YEAR
FallSpring
FCSE 4131, 4132, 4133 3 **FCSE 4601, 4601 12
FCSE 4306, 4103 4 **FCSE 43043
FCSE 4308 3 15
I D 43803
13

TOTAL131-146 hours, dependent on transfer student status.

*Choose from Core Curriculum requirements.

**Admission to Teacher Education and a minimum 2.5 GPA required (apply prior semester).

Choose from F&N 3350, 4380, HD 3301, HDFS upper level, or FCSE 4307.

Family and Consumer Sciences. The Family and Consumer Sciences specialization prepares students for careers in human services, extension, business, government, communications, and other fields which require a broad background in family and consumer sciences. The program includes course work in all family and consumer sciences content areas. Students may expand career opportunities by selecting electives in support areas such as mass communications, business, or computer science. A minor may be obtained by taking 18 semester hours in approved courses. Qualified students must complete an internship (2.5 GPA required) during the junior or senior year. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the specialization.

Family and Consumer Sciences Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
FallSpring
IS 1100 & HUSC 1100 1ENGL 13023
ENGL 13013*Mathematics3
*Mathematics3ANTH 1301 or 13023
FCSE 21021POLS 23023
POLS 13013FADS 1303 3
FFP 1370 3EDIT 23183
I D 13803 18
17
SECOND YEAR
FallSpring
HIST 23003HIST 23013
*Humanities3ENGL 23113
Natural Lab. Science4*Visual & Performing Arts3
FADS 23113HD 33013
Minor or Elective3F&N 14104
16 16
THIRD YEAR
FallSpring
FS 33203H D 33123
SOC 1301 or 13203F&N or RHIM Elective 3
H D 3301 or HDFS 3331 3FCSE 33033
F&N 23103F S elective3
Minor or Elec. 3Minor or Elec. 3
15 15
FOURTH YEAR
FallSpring
HUSC 32142Minor or Elec. 3
*Oral Communication3Minor or Elec. 3
RHIM Elective 3FCSE 43073
Minor or Elec. 3FCSE 43073
H D 33133FFP or I D Elective3
14 15

TOTAL125-137 hours, dependent on transfer student status.

*Choose from Core Curriculum requirements.

Pre-Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences Minor. The Pre-Teaching Minor is designed for students in any major in the College of Human Sciences who plan to seek a family and consumer sciences teaching certificate after completing a bachelor's degree. The minor allows undergraduate students to take 22 hours of the course work required for teacher certification, reducing the time needed to complete certification requirements after graduation. To be admitted to a teacher certification program, students must meet all requirements outlined in the Teacher Education section of this catalog. Students who meet the requirements for admission to a graduate program may combine teacher certification requirements with work toward a master's degree. Courses: FCSE 2102, 3301, EDSE 2300, 4310, FADS 1303, F&N 2310, and 6 hours of guided human sciences electives.

Family and Consumer Sciences Minor. The Family and Consumer Sciences minor is available to students in any major who desire a broad background in family and consumer sciences. The minor includes 18 semester hours in course work representing the various family and consumer sciences content areas. Courses: FCSE 3301 or 3303 and 15 hours of guided human sciences electives.

Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Minor. The minor in Extension Family and Consumer Sciences is designed for students in any major in the College of Human Sciences who wish to prepare for employment in extension family and consumer sciences positions. The 25 hours of course work includes courses from various family and consumer sciences content areas as well as courses which focus on educational methods in Extension. Courses: FS 3320, F&N 1410, FFP 1370, HD 2303, FCSE 3301 or 3303, 4307, and 6 hours of guided human sciences electives.

Food and Nutrition Program (F&N)

This program emphasizes the role of food and nutrition in the health and well being of people. The specialization prepares competent professionals for food science, nutrition, and dietetic careers in hospitals, schools, colleges, food service, business, and government agencies. Courses also contribute to the liberal education of all students who enroll in food and nutrition courses.

Food and Nutrition Minor. A student may minor in food and nutrition by completing 18-19 hours of selected course work. Specific courses for the food and nutrition minor are finalized and approved by the student in conjunction with the major and minor advisors. Courses: F&N 1325 or 1410, 2310, 3350, choose 3 from the following: F&N 2325, 3320, 3340, 4330, 4360, or 4380.

General Dietetics. The Didactic Program in Dietetics at Texas Tech is approved by The American Dietetic Association (ADA) and is designed to provide the student with an academic program which "provides for the achievement of knowledge requirements for entry-level dietitians" as outlined by ADA. After graduation from the program, the student must complete an ADA accredited internship (such as the post-baccalaureate internship offered at Texas Tech) or approved preprofessional practice (AP4) program including 900 hours of supervised practice to gain performance skills needed to be an entry level dietitian. After successful completion of both an undergraduate and practice program, the student is eligible to take the dietetic registration examination, and upon passing the exam become a registered dietitian (R.D.). General Dietetics emphasizes the nutritional care and education of people and prepares the student to qualify for an internship, graduate school, or a position in a hospital, community agency, or a food service system or business with the prime responsibility of improving and maintaining the nutritional status of people.

Food and Nutrition--General Dietetics Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
FallSpring
IS 1100 & HUSC 1100 2ENGL 13023
ENGL 13013RHIM 13033
*Mathematics3CHEM 1308, 11084
CHEM 1307, 11074POLS 23023
POLS 13013F&N 14104
F&N 12012 17
17
SECOND YEAR
FallSpring
HIST 23003HIST 23013
F&N 23103ENGL 23113
CHEM 3303, 31034CHEM 34024
ZOOL 24034ZOOL 24044
*Oral Communication3PSY 1300 or SOC 13013
17 17
THIRD YEAR
FallSpring
RHIM 34604RHIM 34704
F&N 33403MBIO 34004
F&N 43603F&N 33103
F&N 42202MGT 33703
ECO 23053FCSE 33033
HUSC 32142 17
17
FOURTH YEAR
FallSpring
F&N 43203 RHIM 34904
F&N 4340, 41304 F&N 4341, 41304
F&N 43303 *Humanities Elective3
F&N 43803 AAEC 3401 or MATH 23003-4
F S 3320 or H D 2303 3 *Visual & Performing Arts3
16 17-18

TOTAL133-152 hours, dependent on transfer student status.

*Choose from Core Curriculum requirements.

Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional Management Program (RHIM)

The RHIM program prepares students for career opportunities in the hospitality industry and includes courses in business administration, food and nutrition, arts and sciences, and core courses in RHIM. The curriculum keeps pace with changes in the hospitality field by providing classroom and laboratory experiences.

The mission of the Restaurant, Hotel and Institutional Management Program is to prepare professionally competent individuals who will make a contribution to the hospitality industry and to society as a whole.

Texas Tech's RHIM program, recognized as one of the top programs in the U.S., offers a multidisciplinary approach to hospitality education. The curriculum is designed to prepare the student to meet both current and future hospitality needs. The program emphasizes problem solving and creativity in addition to strong practical laboratory experiences. The RHIM program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Programs in Hospitality Administration.

Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional Management Minor. A student may minor in restaurant, hotel, and institutional management by completing 19 hours of selected course work. Specific courses for the RHIM minor are finalized and approved by the student in conjunction with the major and minor advisors. Courses: RHIM 2308, 3341, 3350, 3460, and 6 hours of RHIM electives.

Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional Management Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
FallSpring
IS 1100 & HUSC 1100 2ENGL 13023
ENGL 13013*MATH Elective3
*MATH Elective3POLS 23023
POLS 13013*Natural Lab. Science 4
RHIM 22102RHIM 23083
RHIM 13033 16
16
SECOND YEAR
FallSpring
HIST 23003HIST 23013
ECO 23053F S 33203
F&N 14104Elective3
RHIM 2312 or Elective 3RHIM 33223
RHIM 23223RHIM 33503
1615
THIRD YEAR
FallSpring
Spanish3Spanish3
*COMS 33583*Visual & Performing Arts 3
RHIM 33413RHIM 33203
RHIM 34604RHIM 34704
FD T 33033RHIM 34403
HUSC 32142 17
18
FOURTH YEAR
FallSpring
RHIM 43223RHIM 42002
RHIM 43163Elective3
RHIM 34904RHIM 44154
RHIM 43123RHIM 43133
**RHIM elective3**RHIM elective3
16 15

TOTAL129-147 hours, dependent on transfer student status.

*Choose from Core Curriculum requirements.

**Choose from RHIM 3000, 3308, 3330, 3355, 4320, 4330.

Courses in Family and Consumer Sciences Education. (FCSE)

2102. Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences (1:1:0). Exploration of family and consumer sciences programs in traditional and nontraditional settings, including family and consumer sciences extension, adult education, business and community agencies, and public schools. Includes field experience.

3103. Field Experience in Family and Consumer Sciences I (1:1:0). Supervised observation and teaching in family and consumer sciences. (Concurrently with FCSE 4302).

3301. Foundations of Family and Consumer Sciences Education (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FCSE 2102 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Introduction to programs in secondary schools and other settings. Program development and teaching methods.

3303. Educational Processes in Family and Consumer Sciences Professions (3:3:0). Designed for nonmajors. Focus on the teaching-learning process in professional settings outside the traditional classroom.

3325. Educational Programming: Addiction Issues (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FS 3325. Addiction issues affecting individuals and families in business, community, and school settings. Emphasis on program development, implementation, and evaluation.

4000. Individual Study (V1-6). May be repeated for credit for up to 6 hours.

4103. Field Experiences in Family and Consumer Sciences II (1:1:0). Corequisite: FCSE 4306. Supervised observation and teaching in occupational family and consumer sciences.

4131. Occupational Clothing Services (1:1:1). Prerequisite: FCSE 4302, corequisite: FCSE 4132 and 4133. Fundamentals of production merchandising, promotion, coordination and repair and alteration of mass-produced apparel.

4132. Occupational Home Furnishings (1:1:1). Prerequisite: FCSE 4302, corequisite: FCSE 4131 and 4133. Skill development in home furnishings occupations.

4133. Occupational Child Care and Elderly Services (1:1:1). Corequisite: FCSE 4131 and 4132. Development of competencies needed in occupations related to care for children and elderly services.

4301. Student Teaching in Family and Consumer Sciences (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FCSE 3301 and admission to student teaching. Supervised teaching in an approved secondary family and consumer sciences program. (Concurrently with FCSE 3103).

4302. Professional Applications in Family and Consumer Sciences (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FCSE 4302. Application of family and consumer sciences knowledge and skills in child development, clothing and textiles, family studies, food and nutrition, housing and interiors, and management and consumer economics. (Concurrently with FCSE 3103).

4304. Instructional Management in Family and Consumer Sciences (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FCSE 4306, 4308; corequisite: FCSE 4601. Concurrent with student teaching. Principles and procedures for managing the family and consumer sciences classroom. Designed to support the student teaching experience.

4306. Occupational Family and Consumer Sciences (3:3:0). Application of family and consumer sciences knowledge and skills in food service, home furnishings, clothing, child development, services for the elderly, and institutional and hospitality management. (Concurrently with FCSE 4103).

4307. Internship in Family and Consumer Sciences (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Junior standing, FCSE 3301 or 3303, 2.5 GPA. Supervised experiences in family and consumer sciences positions in extension, business, or related areas. May be repeated once for credit.

4308. Research and Evaluation in Family and Consumer Sciences (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FCSE 4302. Introduction to methods of research and evaluation in family and consumer sciences. Includes practical applications.

4601. Student Teaching in Family and Consumer Sciences (6:6:0). Prerequisite: FCSE 4306, 4308, corequisite: FCSE 4304 Supervised teaching in an approved secondary family and consumer sciences program. (Writing Intensive)

Courses in Food and Nutrition. (F&N)

1201. Introduction to Dietetics (2:2:0). Introduction to the field of dietetics including registration, ethical, legal, and professional issues.

1325. Nutrition, Foods, and Healthy Living (3:3:0). An introduction to the nutrients, their content in food, energy utilization, and the role of diet in health and disease.

1410. Science of Nutrition (4:3:2). Study of the nutrients found in foods and utilization of those nutrients by the body. Designed to convey the basic principles of nutritional science.

2310. Principles of Food Preparation (3:2:2). Application of scientific principles to food preparation. [HECO 1315]

2325. Sports Nutrition (3:3:0). Nutrition concepts and applied nutritional practices for the competitive and amateur athlete and physically active individual.

3310. Essentials of Dietetic Practice (3:2:2). Prerequisite: F&N 1410. Techniques of interviewing, assessment, nutrition care planning, and counseling in dietetic practice. Legal aspects of dietetic practice. (Writing Intensive

3320. Nutrition and Diet Therapy for Allied Health Professionals (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ZOOL 2403. Principles of nutrition and diet therapy as applied to frequently encountered health problems. For nursing, pre-med, and other allied health students.

3340. Human Nutrition (3:3:0). Prerequisite: F&N 1410 and ZOOL 2403. Physiological functioning of nutrients, their availability, and emphasis on dietary adequacy; factors that affect diet and nutrition throughout the life cycle.

3350. Child Nutrition (3:3:0). Nutritional needs of young children in relation to mental and physical development; cultural, social, and psychological aspects of food and dietary patterns.

4000. Individual Study (V1-6). May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

4130. Field Work in Food and Nutrition (1:0:3). Corequisite: F&N 4340 and 4341. Preplanned experiences with evaluation of student performance in hospitals, community health centers, clinics, and volume feeding establishments. May be repeated once for credit.

4220. Scientific Terminology (2:2:0). Terminology in describing normal anatomical, physiological, and psychological conditions and those related to disease and its treatment. For students entering dietetic and allied health professions.

4320. Advanced Human Nutrition (3:3:0). Prerequisite: F&N 3340 and CHEM 3402. Concepts of normal nutrition in relation to the chemistry and physiology of the human body.

4330. Community Nutrition (3:3:0). Prerequisite: F&N 1410. Study of nutrition-related problems in the community; and the various resources, activities, agencies, and programs involved in health promotion and disease prevention.

4340. Clinical Dietetics I (3:3:0). Prerequisites: F&N 3310, CHEM 3402, ZOOL 2404, and concurrent enrollment in F&N 4130. Nutritional assessment and oral, enteral, and parenteral nutritional support. Pathophysiology, medical management, nutritional assessment, and nutritional therapy as they relate to protein energy malnutrition; trauma; obesity; diabetes mellitus; and endocrine, pancreatic, and gallbladder disorders.

4341. Clinical Dietetics II (3:3:0). Prerequisites: F&N 4340, and concurrent enrollment in F&N 4130. Pathophysiology, medical management, nutritional assessment, and nutritional therapy as they relate to disorders of the hepatic, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, hematopoietic, immune, renal, and pulmonary systems; cancer; diseases of childhood; and pregnancy.

4360. Experimental Methods with Food (3:1:6). Prerequisite: F&N 2310 and general chemistry. Investigation of the chemical and physical factors influencing quality in food; consideration of proportions, manipulations of ingredients, and additives in preparation.

4380. Cultural Aspects of Food (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. A study of the historical, social, psychological, economic, religious, and aesthetic significance of food customs in various cultures. (Writing Intensive)

Courses in Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional
Management. (RHIM)

1303. Computers in the Hospitality Industry (3:2:3). Introduction to the computer and its uses in the hospitality industry. Includes computer operation, characteristics of hardware, software, and managerial interpretation of output.

2210. Introduction to Hospitality Management (2:2:0). Analyzes the nature of work, people, and the interrelationships within the hospitality industry. Explores various career options.

2308. Hotel Operations (3:2:3). Principles and practices of managerial functions relating to the operation of hotel and motel facilities.

2312. Introduction to Beverage Management (3:3:0). Principles and practices regarding the production, selection, storage, and serving of beverages. Emphasis on responsible beverage use in business and social settings.

2322. Hospitality Control I (3:3:0). Introduction to hospitality control devices needed to measure fiscal success. [ACCT 2301]

3000. Internship in Hospitality (V1-6). Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and 2.5 GPA. Experiences in hospitality settings. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit.

3308. Hotel Group Sales and Services (3:3:0). Prerequisite: RHIM 2308. Emphasis on the function of convention and meeting sales and service departments related to lodging and tourism operations. Explores factors involved in the management of large group sales.

3320. Facilities Management (3:3:0). Management principles and practices relative to the internal maintenance of public dining and lodging facilities. Systematic control of hospitality spaces to safeguard health and to use available aesthetic values.

3322. Hospitality Control II (3:3:0). Prerequisite RHIM 2322, 1303. Application of fiscal control devices in the hospitality industry. Includes computer applications in industry situations.

3330. Special Topics in Hospitality (3:3:0). Semester long study of a specific topic pertinent to the hospitality industry. May be repeated (different topics) for a maximum of 12 hours credit.

3341. Hospitality Management (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 1302. Factors involved in establishing hospitality operations, organization, administrative development, allocation of labor, and control. Examines hospitality organizations with emphasis on planning and problem analysis. (Writing Intensive)

3350. Travel and Tourism (3:3:0). An analysis of the economic and cultural impact of the international travel and tourism industry, including destination development, cultural integration, and demand for travel services.

3355. Club and Resort Management (3:3:0). Principles and practices of the general managerial procedures utilized in private clubs and resorts.

3460. Food Systems Management I (4:3:4). Sophomore standing. Application of scientific food preparation and management principles to quantity food production. Includes laboratory experience in quantity food facility.

3470. Food Systems Management II (4:3:3). Prerequisite: RHIM 3460 and 3 hrs. MATH. Optimum use of human, financial, and material resources by managers. Laboratory experiences include commercial food preparation and service.

3490. Purchasing in the Hospitality Industry (4:2:2). Prerequisite: RHIM 1303 and 3460. Current ethical, economic, legislative, and industrial developments related to purchasing food products and durable goods.

4000. Individual Study (V1-6). May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

4200. Practicum (2:2:0). Prerequisite: Graduating seniors final semester, 600 hours of work-experience training completed, or consent of instructor. Beginning a career through the development of job search strategies, interviewing skills, and resume writing. Students can interview with a large variety of companies for entry-level management positions.

4312. Beverage Control Management (3:3:0). Prerequisite: RHIM 3460. Selection, storage, and service of beverages with emphasis on inventory control, sales promotion, and profits.

4313. Legal Aspects of Hospitality Industry (3:3:0). A study of the laws applicable to restaurants, hotels, and associated businesses. Includes duties, rights, and liabilities of institutions and guests.

4316. Hospitality Management Marketing (3:3:0). Prerequisite: RHIM 1303, 2308, 3341, and senior standing. Application of marketing concepts, methods, and techniques used in the hospitality industry. Analysis of principles of consumer behavior, market research, promotion, and marketing strategy.

4320. Hospitality Entrepreneurship (3:3:0). Prerequisite: RHIM 3322. Aspects of opening and operating a small hospitality business.

4322. Hospitality Cost Control III (3:3:0). Prerequisite: RHIM 3322. Utilization of fiscal control devices in the hospitality industry to develop financial assets and manage their application.

4330. Contemporary Problems in the Hospitality Industry (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Senior RHIM majors. In-depth examination of selected problems in the hospitality industry.

4415. Advanced Food Production Management (4:2:6). Prerequisite: RHIM 3322, 3470, 3490, 4312, FDT 3303. Assumption of maximum responsibility of management of actual food service operation based on sound managerial principles and successful food production and service techniques. (Writing Intensive)


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