College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Professor John R. Abernathy, Dean

Programs are available through the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources leading to the following graduate degrees:

Master of Science with majors in Agricultural and Applied Economics, Agricultural Education, Animal Science, Crop Science, Entomology, Fisheries Science, Food Technology, Horticulture, Range Science, Soil Science, and Wildlife Science.

Master of Agriculture with a major in Agriculture and specializations available through the various departments and the International Textile Center. The Master of Agriculture degree program is designed to prepare students and professionals as leaders, managers, and executives in the agricultural sciences and natural resources areas. Because the program is multidisciplinary and includes a wide choice of professional courses, it prepares graduates to enter a diversity of careers. A student may select an emphasis in the following departments: Agricultural and Applied Economics, Agricultural Education and Communications, Animal Science and Food Technology, and Plant and Soil Science. Courses for the Master of Agriculture degree program may be taken from offerings in the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources and from other colleges of the University. A minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate course work is required for this nonthesis degree. For a specific option a student would normally take 18 hours in the department concerned with the emphasis area and the balance in at least three other areas. An oral or written comprehensive examination as specified by the emphasis department is required.

Master of Landscape Architecture is a terminal professional degree for students with a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree or equivalent and a first professional degree for students with any other professional degree.

Doctor of Philosophy with majors in Agricultural and Applied Economics, Agronomy, Animal Science, Fisheries Science, Range Science, and Wildlife Science.

Doctor of Education with a major in Agricultural Education.

A University-wide interdisciplinary program leading to the Ph.D. degree in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design is also offered. A Doctor of Education degree is available from the College of Education for students who wish to have agricultural education as a support area.

Applicants who meet the admission standards of the Graduate School also must receive formal approval from a departmental committee. Admission standards of some departments exceed those of the Graduate School.

Advisory committees for the M.S., M.Ag., and M.L.A. degrees will consist of at least three faculty members. Advisory committees for the Ph.D. degree in Agricultural and Applied Economics will consist of four or five members. Advisory committees for Ph.D. degrees in the departments of Range, Wildlife, and Fisheries Management, Plant and Soil Science, and Animal Science and Food Technology will have five members on their advisory committees.

A preliminary examination is required of all doctoral students before the end of the second semester of work toward the Ph.D. degree. The student's progress will be evaluated and recommendations will be made concerning continuation of graduate studies and leveling work necessary to remove any deficiencies revealed by the examination.

No specific language or tool requirements exist for the graduate programs. However, such requirements may be incorporated when deemed appropriate. Other requirements for the degree programs are specified in other sections of this catalog.

Courses in Agricultural Science. (AGSC)

5303. Ecology of Grazing Lands Systems (3:3:0). A field oriented course on ecology, management, and research in forage-livestock systems.

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