Department of Engineering Technology

Professor Ron Pigott, Chairperson.

Professor Masten; Associate Professors Alayyan, Burkett, Ernst, Green, and Reynolds; Assistant Professors Akram, Bai, and Darwish; Lecturers Potter and Reeder.

This department supervises the following degree program: ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY, Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology. Students may select course work in one of three areas of specializationconstruction, electrical-electronics, or mechanical engineering technology. All three options are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, Maryland 21202-Telephone: (410) 347-7700. This department also supervises engineering technology options in the Master of Engineering degree program.

The engineering technologist generally works in the applied part of the engineering spectrum and is playing an increasingly important role in our technological society. Rather than preparing students to go into research, the engineering technology program prepares students for those engineering activities that emphasize the application of engineering knowledge to solution of practical, industrial problems. The activities of the engineering technologist usually include product development, construction supervision, technical sales, component design, field service engineering, work force coordination, and supervision.

The curriculum in engineering technology consists of a basic core of about 60 semester hours of specified courses. These courses in basic science, humanities, social studies, mathematics, and applied science give a foundation in technology and general education. The remaining 68-69 hours of required course work vary with the student's choice of engineering technology area and selection of electives. The program specializations allow in-depth training in the student's chosen field of occupational endeavor.

The construction specialization stresses basic structural design and construction operations to prepare students to enter various phases of the construction industry. Course work includes basic structural design and analysis, contracts and specifications, construction management, safety and health, surveying, cost estimating, scheduling, and transportation.

The curriculum in electrical-electronics engineering technology is designed to bring the student to a high level of understanding of the body of engineering and scientific knowledge within the broad scope of electrical engineering, but with emphasis upon the application of this knowledge to current industrial practices. The program prepares students to work in all phases of development, design, production, and maintenance in the field of communication, automatic controls, digital systems, computers, instrumentation, and others.

Mechanical engineering technology is concerned with energy, mechanical devices, and manufacturing. The curriculum gives a good base for further learning, via industrial experience, in all of these areas. The curriculum emphasizes environmental control (heating, ventilating, cooling, and humidity control), and steam powered electric generating plants and mechanical design. Both environmental control and steam power plants offer relatively stable employment, and many engineering technology graduates have obtained jobs in these areas. In the area of mechanical devices, courses in strength of materials, kinematics, dynamics, and design are offered. These courses equip the student to create a mechanical device that will perform the desired function and then design the parts of the mechanical device with sufficient strength to perform that function. Balancing the mechanical device to provide smooth operation is included. Study of various types of machine tools, manufacturing processes, and introduction to numerical control is included to provide an understanding of the current industrial practices.

Students are required to plan their program in consultation with faculty advisors. Emphasis on communication skills requires the inclusion of business and professional communications studies (COMS 3358) and technical writing (ENGL 2311).

Engineering technology students may pursue a minor in virtually any field of study at Texas Tech. The minor must consist of a minimum of 18 hours, with at least 6 of those hours being junior or senior level courses.

A minor in engineering technology is available by completing 18 hours of selected engineering technology courses. The appropriate engineering technology advisor should be consulted for a list of approved courses.

In order to obtain a degree in engineering technology, transfer students must complete at least 30 credit hours of engineering technology courses in their discipline.

It is required that all students have a personal computer. Students should check with the department to obtain recommended specifications.

Once a student has elected to take the State Board FE Exam, that student is then obligated to pass the exam in order to graduate.

If a student obtains a grade of D or less in a given course twice, or drops a given course twice, or obtains a D or less once and withdraws once, then the student will be required, with the help of the department secretary, to set up a meeting with their advisor, the course instructor, and the department chairperson prior to registration for the next semester or summer session. The meeting will focus on how the student can be helped to succeed and the following actions will be considered:

·The student will be counseled on how to improve performance.

·The student will be required to take courses that he may have already passed or received transfer credit for in order to correct a deficiency that is identified as hindering the student's progress.

·The student will be required to take a time management course at the PASS center.

·The student will be required to take the XL course.

Students failing to set up the meeting will have a transcript and registration hold entered on their record. If a student obtains a grade of D or less in a given course, drops a given course, or some combination of the two three times, then the student may be required to transfer to the Bachelor of Arts in Engineering program.

The department's mission to provide educational opportunities to a greater cross-section of the state's population includes the following objectives:

To provide high quality engineering technology programs with appeal to a broad range of students including traditional students, under-represented populations, and the by-passed learner. (The by-passed learner is one who has two or more of the following characteristics: Was not a great success in high school, was not planning to attend post-secondary education after high school, has been away from school for some time, or is a first generation collegian. Very often these students have the ability and desire to do very well in Engineering Technology. The foundational curriculum at the beginning of the programs, the supportive faculty, and the instructional environment make the engineering technology programs more attractive to the by-passed learner than traditional engineering programs.)

To provide programs that reflect the needs of industry worldwide.

To provide the support necessary for students to develop their intellectual capacities, technical competencies, and social responsibilities.

To have faculty who perform independent applied research and/or consulting that will add depth, quality, and practical experience to the department.

To continuously improve the programs in order to correlate with the type and rate of change in the global marketplace.

Engineering Technology Curriculum.

Construction Specialization

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
ENGL 1301, Ess. Coll. Rhetoric 3 ENGL 1302, Adv. Coll. Rhetoric 3
MATH 1321, Trigonometry 3 MATH 2322, Anal. Geo. & Calc I 3
*CHEM 1305, Chem. and Society 3 PHYS 1306, Gen. Phys. I 3
*CHEM 1105, Exp. Gen. Chem. I (Lab.) 1 PHYS 1103, Exp. Gen. Phys. I (Lab.) 1
CTEC 1312, Const. Matl's. & Methods 3 EGR 1307, Engineering Graphics 3
GTEC 1130, Technology Seminar 1 GTEC 1211, Computer Prog. 2
14 15
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 2323, Calculus II 3 GTEC 3311, Appl. Mech II-Strengths 3
HIST 2300, Hist. of U.S. to 1877 3 GTEC 3412, Appl. Mech. III-Fluids 4
*GEOL 1303, Physical Geology 3 CTEC 2301, Surveying & Surveys 3
*GEOL 1101, Physical Geology Lab. 1 ENGL 2311, Patterns of Reports 3
GTEC 2311, Statics 3 POLS 1301, Amer. Govt., Org. 3
GTEC 1312, AC/DC Technology 3 16
16
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
*MATH 3322, High. Math for En. Tech. 3 MATH 2300, Statistical Methods 3
COMS 3358, Bus. & Prof. Speech 3 HIST 2301, Hist. of U.S. since 1877 3
CTEC 3311, Struct. Analysis 3 CTEC 3302, Transportation Tech. 3
CTEC 3313, Found. & Earthwork 3 CTEC 3104, Soil Properties Lab. 1
CTEC 3103, Materials Msmt. Lab. 1 GTEC 2351, Thermodynamics 3
CTEC 4313, Masonry Struc. 3 GTEC 4121, Technology Seminar 1
16 GTEC 4322, Cost & Prof. Anal. 3
17
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
CTEC 4312, Steel Structures 3 CTEC 4341, Const. Management 3
CTEC 4342, Cost Estimating I 3 CTEC 4311, Concrete Structures 3
GTEC 4270 Capstone Design 2 CTEC 4321, Contracts & Specs. 3
POLS 2302, Amer. Public Policy 3 CTEC 4343, Constr. Safety & Health 3
*ECO 2305, Prin. of Economics 3 Visual & Performing Arts Elective 3
Humanities Elective 3 15
17

Minimum number of hours required for graduation--129 including internship.

*Suitable Substitutions can be made with approval of option coordinator.

Electrical--Electronics Specialization

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
ENGL 1301, Ess. Coll. Rhetoric 3 ENGL 1302, Adv. Coll. Rhetoric 3
MATH 1321, Trigonometry 3 MATH 2322, Anal. Geo. & Calc I 3
CHEM 1305, Chem. and Society 3 PHYS 1306, Gen. Phys. I 3
CHEM 1105, Exp. Gen. Chem. I (Lab.) 1 PHYS 1103, Exp. Gen. Phys. I (Lab.) 1
EGR 1307, Engineering Graphics 3 GTEC 1312, AC/DC Technology 3
GTEC 1130, Technology Seminar 1 GTEC 1211, Computer Prog. 2
POLS 1301, Amer. Govt., Org. 3 Ind. or Group Behav. 3
17 18
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 2323, Calculus II 3 EET 2312, Optoelec. Devices 3
HIST 2300, Hist. of U.S. to 1877 3 EET 2112, Optoelectronics Lab. 1
EET 2311, Linear Elec. 3 GTEC 2351, Thermodynamics 3
EET 2111, Linear Elec. Lab. 1 PHYS 1307, General Physics II 3
EET 2314, Digital Techn. I 3 PHYS 1104, General Physics II Lab 1
EET 2114, Digital Technology I Lab. 1 HIST 2301, Hist. of U.S. since 1877 3
GTEC 2311, Static 3 ENGL 2311, Patterns of Reports 3
17 17
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 3322, High. Math. for En. Tech. 3 EET 3312, Digital Communications 3
POLS 2302, Amer. Pub. Pol. 3 EET 3112, Digital Comm. Lab. 1
EET 3311, Telecomm. Tech. 3 EET 3314, Digital Technology II 3
EET 3111, Telecomm. Tech. Lab. 1 EET 3114, Digital Tech. II Lab 1
EET 3316, Local/Internet Networks 3 EET 3324, Linear Des. Appls. 3
EET 3116, Local/Internet Lab. 1 EET 3124, Linear Des. Lab 1
14 COMS 3358, Bus. & Prof. Speech 3
15
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
EET 4317, Adv. Micro-Electronics 3 EET 4353, Control Systems 3
EET 4331, System Des. Lab. I 3 EET 4370, Capstone Design course 3
EET 3321, Prog. Logic Cont. 3 GTEC 4131, Intro. Proj. Mgt. 1
EET 3121, Prog. Logic Cont. Lab. 1 Visual & Performing Arts Elective 3
GTEC 4121, Technology Seminar 1 C S 1462, Fund. of Comp. Sci. 4
Humanities Elective 3 14
14

Minimum number or hours required for graduation--129 including internship.

Mechanical Specialization

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
ENGL 1301, Ess. Coll. Rhetoric 3 ENGL 1302, Adv. Coll. Rhetoric 3
MATH 1321, Trigonometry 3 MATH 2322, Anal. Geo. & Calc I 3
CHEM 1305, Chem. and Society 3 PHYS 1306, Gen. Phys. I 3
CHEM 1105, Exp. Gen. Chem. I (Lab.) 1 PHYS 1103, Exp. Gen. Phys. I (Lab.) 1
EGR 1306, Engineering Graphics 3 POLS 1301, Amer. Govt., Org. 3
GTEC 1130, Technology Seminar 1 GTEC 1211, Computer Prog. 2
MTEC 1312, Mechanical Technology 3 15
17
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
MATH 2323, Calculus II 3 GTEC 3311, Strength of Materials 3
PHYS 1307, Gen. Phys. II 3 MTEC 3370, Intro. Proj. Mgt. 3
PHYS 1104, Exp. Gen. Phys. II (Lab.) 1 GTEC 2351, Thermodynamics 3
POLS 2302, Amer. Public Policy 3 ENGL 2311, Patterns of Reports 3
GTEC 2311, Statics 3 COMS 3358, Bus. & Prof. Comm. 3
GTEC 1312, AC/DC Technology 3 15
16
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
MTEC 3441, Mat. for Mech. Tech. 4 GTEC 3412, Fluid Mechanics & Lab. 4
GTEC 2151, Intro. to Thermo. Lab 1 MTEC 3412, Vap. & Gas Cycl. & Lab. 4
HIST 2300, Hist. of U.S. to 1877 3 GTEC 4121, Technology Seminar 1
MATH 3322, High. Math. for En. Tech. 3 MTEC elective 3
Individual or Group Behavior 3 HIST 2301, Hist. of U.S. since 1877 3
14 Humanities Elective 3
18
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
MTEC 4351, Mechanisms 3 MTEC 4352, Dynamics 3
MTEC 4311, AC Design I 3 MTEC 4353, Mech. Design 3
MTEC 4321, Mech. Tech. Lab. 3 GTEC 4322, Cost and Prof. Anal. 3
MTEC elective 3 MTEC 4370, Capstone Design Course 3
Visual & Performing Arts Elective 3 Elective 3
15 15

Minimum number of hours required for graduation128 including internship.

Internship. The Department of Engineering Technology believes that its students benefit greatly from participation in an internship program. One of the major benefits is improved full-time employment opportunities after graduation. Accordingly, all engineering technology students are required to complete at least the equivalent of 3 months of full-time work of an appropriate nature in order to graduate. However, part-time work conducted during the regular semester will be considered if of an appropriate nature. Students must enroll in GTEC 4300 while pursuing the internship.

Credit by Exam. In addition to standard transfer credits, the Department of Engineering Technology will permit students to receive credit for any course in the curriculum if they can demonstrate proficiency in that area by examination. It is the responsibility of the students to petition the department chairperson for such examination(s) well before they would enroll in the course(s).

The examination for credit for E GR 1306, Engineering Graphics, is held only in the fall, the first Friday after classes begin. Students must register for the examination in Room 224, Mechanical Engineering Building, by 5 p.m. the first Wednesday after classes begin for the fall term. Students should have a background in beginning drawing and descriptive geometry.

Courses in Engineering Graphics. (EGR)

1306. Engineering Graphics-Software A (3:2:4). Fundamental engineering graphical design techniques and terminology to include freehand lettering, scales, and sketching of views of solid models using basic descriptive geometry principles. Transition to 3-D Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) and Solid Modeling occurs early in the course with emphasis on generic design principles and documentation. SDRC's IDEAS is the software used in this class.

1307. Engineering Graphics-Software B (3:2:4). Fundamental engineering graphical design techniques and terminology to include freehand lettering, scales, and sketching of views of solid models using basic descriptive geometry principles. Transition to 3-D Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) and Solid Modeling occurs early in the course with emphasis on generic design principles and documentation. AutoCAD is the software used in this class.

Courses in General Engineering Technology. (GTEC)

1130. Technology Seminar (1:2:0). Introduction for first year and transfer students to the subdisciplines of practice within engineering technology. Other topics to promote progress and understanding by students will be included. The student will also be required to take a simple communications test in this class.

1211. Computer Programming (2:1:2). Theory and practice in logical solutions of numerical problems. Introduction to computer languages. Computer programming using an appropriate level language. [ENGR 2304]

1312. Alternating and Direct Current Technology (3:2:3). Prerequisite: MATH 1320; corequisite: GTEC 1211. Principles of electrical and magnetic circuits and their application in the operation of electrical power equipment. [ENGR 2405]

2151. Introduction to Thermodynamics Lab (1:0:3). Prerequisite: PHYS 1103, 1306; corequisite: MATH 1352 or 2323 and GTEC 2351. Provide a laboratory experience to compliment the lecture course GTEC 2351.

2311. Applied Mechanics­Statics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: PHYS 1306, 1103; corequisite: MATH 1352 or 2323. Equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Analysis of trusses, frames, machines, and beams. Friction, centroids, moments of inertia.

2351. Introduction to Thermodynamics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: PHYS 1306, 1103; corequisite: MATH 1352 or 2323. A study of the fundamental laws of thermodynamics and their application to analysis of gas, steam, and refrigeration cycles.

3311. Applied Mechanics II­Strength of Material (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GTEC 2311. Corequisite: MATH 1352 or 2323. A study of the elastic and plastic behavior of materials and structural elements.[ENGR 2332]

3412. Applied Mechanics III­Fluids (4:3:3). Prerequisite: GTEC 2311. Fluid statics and dynamics, flow of fluids in pipe and open channel. Laboratory: study of fluid flow systems, pumps, and measurement.

4121. Technology Seminar (1). Prerequisite: Advanced standing. Review of engineering technology fundamentals. Final is a mini fundamentals of engineering type examination.

4131. Special Topics in Technology (1:1:0). Prerequisite: Approval of chairperson. Individual studies in special areas of technology.

4300. Cooperative Education (3). Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval of department chairperson. Practice in industry and written reports. Maximum of six semester credit hours may be earned and applied to degree requirements.

4322. Cost and Profit Analysis for Engineering Technologists (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Senior standing or approval of option coordinator. Application of engineering economics to engineering technology disciplines. Factors of time, cost, profit, and risk are evaluated and where applicable integrated in the decision process. Ethical issues are examined.

4331. Special Topics in Technology (3). Prerequisite: Advanced standing and approval of chairperson. Individual studies in special areas in technology. May be repeated for credit.

4431. Special Projects in Engineering Technology (4:3:3). Prerequisite: Approval of chairperson. Individual projects in areas of engineering technology. May be repeated for credit.

Courses in Construction Engineering Technology. (CTEC)

1312. Construction Methods (3:3:0). Introduction to the construction environment and construction methods, materials, processes, working drawings, and specifications. Field trips to local construction sites and laboratory construction projects are required.

2301. Surveying and Surveys (3:2:3). Prerequisite: MATH 1320 and 1321 or equivalent. Care and use of modern surveying equipment; differential leveling, area calculations; horizontal and vertical curves; effects of observation errors. [ENGR 1307]

3103. Materials Measurements Laboratory (1:0:3). Prerequisite: GTEC 3311. The study and testing of construction materials including nondestructive methods.

3104. Soil Properties Laboratory (1:0:3). Prerequisite: GTEC 3311. The study and testing of the engineering properties of soils including field testing simulations.

3302. Transportation Technology (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CTEC 2301 and GTEC 3412. Design of components of the transportation system needed for modern society with practical examples.

3311. Structural Analysis (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GTEC 3311. Analysis of determinate and indeterminate structural systems.

3313. Foundations and Earthwork (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GTEC 3311. Soil properties, elements of soil mechanics, and the design of foundations for structures.

4270. Capstone Design Course (2:1:4). Prerequisite: Approval of the CTEC advisor. Design and development of construction projects. Projects vary from semester to semester. The ASC-Region V Competition is one of the projects. Generally will include cost estimating, scheduling, design, final report and presentation, and working in teams.

4311. Reinforced Concrete Structures(3:3:0). Prerequisite: CTEC 3311. Common practices of design and construction of reinforced concrete structures (ACI-318). Includes wood form work design.

4312. Steel Structures (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CTEC 3311. Common practices of design and construction of steel structures (AISC-ASD).

4313. Masonry Structures (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GTEC 3311. A study of material properties and common practices of design and construction of masonry structures.

4321. Construction Contracts and Specifications (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Senior standing or approval of option coordinator. Principles and analysis of construction contracts and project specifications. Other aspects of construction management such as contract laws, negotiations, and professional ethics will be examined.

4331. Special Topics in Construction Technology (3). Prerequisite: Senior standing. Special study project within field of interest of student.

4341. Construction Management (3:2:2). Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. Capstone course for the construction engineering technology student. Modern methods for managing construction projects including critical path scheduling, resource allocation, and funds flow. Practical applications are made through simulated projects.

4342. Cost Estimating (3:2:2). Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. Analysis of construction working drawings and specifications to quantify material, labor, overhead, and equipment requirements relative to project bid preparation. Computer software programs are utilized to develop construction bids for simulated projects and case studies are used to develop both technical and professional ethics.

4343. Construction­Safety and Health (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. Management of safety and health in the construction environment. Basic elements of a safety and health program for the construction general contractor are examined to include regulator agencies.

Courses in Electrical-Electronics Engineering Technology. (EET)

2111. Linear Electronics Lab (1:0:3). Corequisite: EET 2311 concurrent enrollment. Designed to supplement the lecture course with laboratory experimental techniques.

2112. Optoelectronics Lab (1:0:3). Corequisite: EET 2312 concurrent enrollment. A laboratory course to introduce students to experimental techniques and to complement the lecture material in EET 2312.

2114. Digital Technology I Lab (1:0:3). Corequisite: EET 2314 concurrent enrollment. Designed to supplement the lecture material of EET 2314 with laboratory experiments.

2311. Linear Electronics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GTEC 1312, PHYS 1306, 1103. Fundamental of electronic circuit theory and characteristics of active devices networks.

2312. Optoelectronic Devices (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EET 2311, 2111; corequisite: PHYS 1307, 1104. A study of optoelectronic devices, fiber optics, and basic communication systems.

2314. Digital Technology I (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GTEC 1312; corequisite: EET 2311, 2111. Fundamentals of Boolean theorems, logic circuits, and applications.

3111. Telecommunications Lab (1:0:3). Corequisite: EET 3311 concurrent enrollment. Implementation of the theorem and applications of EET 3311 in the laboratory.

3112. Digital Communications Lab (1:0:3). Corequisite: EET 3312 concurrent enrollment. Designed to introduce students to experimental techniques and to complement the lecture course EET 3312.

3114. Digital Technology II Lab (1:0:3). Corequisite: EET 3314 concurrent enrollment. Laboratory experiments to complement the lecture material of EET 3314.

3116. LocalInternet Lab (1:0:3). Corequisite: EET 3316 concurrent enrollment. Laboratory experiments include logic link control (LLC), and medium access control (MAC).

3121. Program Logic Controller Lab (1:0:3). Corequisite: EET 3321 concurrent enrollment. Laboratory experiments include EEPROM's, GAL's, and PAL's IC's.

3124. Linear Design Lab (1:0:3). Corequisite: EET 3324 concurrent enrollment. Laboratory experiments include design and applications to complement the lecture material in EET 3324.

3311. Telecommunications Technology (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EET 2112, 2312, MATH 2322; Corequisite: MATH 2323. A study of voice and data communications with fiber optic applications.

3312. Digital Communications (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EET 3111, 3311; corequisite: EET 3114, 3314. A study of modulate and demodulate digital signals, and digital satellite systems.

3314. Digital Technology II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EET 2114, 2314. A study of advanced MSI and LSI digital IC's with emphasis on applications.

3316. LocalInternet Network Systems (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EET 3111, 3311; corequisite: EET 3112, 3312. A study of transmission media, protocols, interface, and bridgesrouting Internet working standards.

3321. Programmable Logic Controller (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EET 3114, 3314; Corequisite: MATH 2323. A comprehensive study of relay logic, ladder logic, and programming controllers.

3324. Linear Design and Applications (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EET 3121, 3321. An advanced study of operational amplifiers, phase locked loops, and RLC oscillators.

4317. Advanced Micro-Electronic Technology (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EET 3314 and 3114. The study of microprocessor circuits and their incorporation into functional systems.

4331. System Design Laboratory I (3:0:9). Corequisite: EET 3321 and GTEC 4121. A laboratory course to accompany first-semester senior courses in electrical-electronics engineering technology.

4353. Control Systems (3:3:0). Prerequisite: EET 3321, 3324, MATH 3322. An introduction to automatic control systems and the electro-mechanical components used in control systems.

4370. Capstone Design Course (3:1:6). Prerequisite: EET 4331. Corequisite: MATH 3322 and EET 4353. Design and analysis of electrical-electronics engineering projects. Projects vary from semester to semester. Participation in a suitable competition can satisfy this course requirement. Generally will include presentation of proposal, scheduling, design, final report and presentation, and working in teams.

Courses in Mechanical Engineering Technology. (MTEC)

1312. Mechanical Technology (3:3:0). Introduction to manufacturing processes and plant operations; plant visits and field trips; familiarization with equipment and instruments; metal fabrication, machine tools, welding, heat treating, and associated safety practices.

3342. Process Automation (3:2:3). Prerequisite: MTEC 1312 and junior standing. Selected topics in automated manufacturing systems including: numerical controlled machinery, programmed controllers, robotics, inspection, and material handling devices.

3370. Introduction to Project Management and Quality Control (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Consent of coordinator. Introduction to project management including evaluation, planning, and implementation. The course also includes an introduction to statistical process control and ISO standards.

3412. Analysis of Vapor and Gas Cycles with Laboratory (4:3:3). Prerequisite: GTEC 2351. Evaluation of power and refrigeration cycles. Laboratory study of the component equipment of refrigeration and power cycles.

3441. Materials Technology (4:3:3). Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Introduction to the fundamental nature of the structure and properties of engineering materials, their mechanical properties, and behavior based upon their composition.

4311. Air Conditioning System Design I (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GTEC 2351. The design and arrangement of air conditioning systems. Calculation of heating and cooling loads, piping design, and duct design. Psychrometric system analysis.

4312. Applied Energy Conversion (3:3:0). Prerequisite: MTEC 3412. Overview of modern power plants and the thermodynamics of steam power stations. Analysis and design of turbines. Introduction to alternative energy conservation.

4313. Air Conditioning System Design II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: MTEC 4311. Continuation of MTEC 4311 with energy use estimations, energy conservation, automatic controls, selection of fans and pumps, and a design project.

4321. Mechanical Technology Laboratory (3:0:6). Senior projects laboratory. Testing and analysis of components of heat power, refrigeration, and mechanical systems.

4332. Specialized Topics in Mechanical Technology (3). Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of instructor. In-depth study of specialized topics of particular interest to the mechanical technologist. May be repeated for credit.

4351. Mechanisms of Machinery (3:3:0). Prerequisite: MATH 1351 or 2322. Kinematic analysis and synthesis of cams, gears, and linkages. Applications to machine elements and assemblies.

4352. Dynamics of Machinery (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GTEC 2311, MTEC 4351. Study of dynamic forces generated in machinery. Balancing of rotating machines. Analysis of gyroscopes and vibration of mechanical systems.

4353. Mechanical Design (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GTEC 3311, MTEC 3441, MTEC 4351. Analysis of stresses and deformations in machine elements. Analysis of strength of machine elements including theories of failure. Design of mechanical elements such as shafts, screws, columns, springs, journal bearings, roller and ball bearings, spur gears, and flexible mechanical elements.

4370. Capstone Design Course (3:1:6). Prerequisite: GTEC 4121 and senior standing. Design and analysis of mechanical engineering projects. Projects vary from semester to semester. Participation in the SAE Mini-Baja Competition can satisfy this course requirement. Generally will include presentation of proposal, scheduling, design, final report and presentation, and working in teams.


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