Department of Human Development
and Family Studies

Professor Dean Busby, Chairperson.

Professors Bell, Haley, Fischer, Scott, and K. Wampler; Associate Professors Andersen, Caldera, Crawford, Fitzpatrick, Ivey, Munsch, Sorell, and R. Wampler; Assistant Professors Colwell, Feng, Harris, Hart, Lindsey, Mulsow, Reifman, Stelle, Weaver, and Wieling; Instructors: Driskill, Johnson, and Nathan; Adjunct Faculty: S. Hendrick, Peek, Reid, and Shapiro.

This department supervises the following degree programs: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES, Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy; Marriage and Family Therapy, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy.

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies offers a wide range of courses in the areas of human development, interpersonal relations, family studies, substance abuse studies, and family therapy. Graduates of the department may enter a variety of human services vocations and/or pursue graduate studies. In addition, they receive valuable practical training to improve their own competence in parenting, child care, interpersonal and family relationships. Students interested only in selected aspects may elect to minor in the department, in substance abuse studies, or choose electives while pursuing another major course of study.

Human Development and Family Studies,
Early Childhood, and Human Development and Family Studies Teacher Certification Specializations

Human Development and Family Studies. From a foundation of research and theory, the specialization focuses on development across the lifespan (prenatal to late adulthood) in the context of couple, marriage, family, and peer relationships. This program focuses on intrapersonal (e.g., personality, cognition), interpersonal (e.g., relationship conflict, self-disclosure), and societal (e.g., race-ethnicity, class) forces as they affect personal and family well-being.

A variety of courses offer perspectives on interpersonal, marital and family behavior through development of the infant, child, adolescent, young adult (courtship, early marriage), middle-aged adult (divorce-remarriage, parenthood), and the older adult (widowhood, grandparenthood). Some courses also focus on important social issues that affect individual and family functioning (e.g., substance abuse, violence). Courses at the upper-division level provide professional training for the person wishing to seek employment in fields as diverse as family life education, extension, probation, child development specialist, or child care administration.

Service-research skills are also enhanced by opportunities to observe and interact with infants, toddlers, and young children in the Child Development Research Center. The Center is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Supervised experiences with community groups provide opportunities for interaction with older children, adolescents, couples, families, and the elderly. These experiences assist students in understanding developmental stages of human behavior and interpersonal relations as they occur in family or group care settings.

Undergraduate students may want to specialize in one or more of the five block areas under which courses are offered in the department. These areas include childhood, adolescence-adult development, addictions, family relationships, or application-research. Students may specialize in one or more of these areas by taking departmental elective courses from the desired blocks.

Human Development and Family Studies Minor. A student may minor in HDFS by completing 18 hours of selected course work. The specific courses for the HDFS minor are approved by the Academic Advising Office in the College of Human Sciences.

Child-Care Director Specialization. Students wishing to meet the state requirement of 6 hours of administration to become child-care directors should take HDFS 4330 and HDFS 4314 practicum in the Child Development Research Center office.

Early Childhood Teachers Certification. The early childhood specialization prepares professionals to work with children from infancy through 4th grade. More details on this program are listed under the curriculum plan.

Human Development and Family Studies Teachers Certification. Human development and family studies majors can choose an option, which includes teachers certification in family and consumer sciences. More details on this program are listed under the curriculum plan.

Departmental Curriculum Plans

University Core Curriculum. All Students in the department must complete the university's Core Curriculum requirements. As part of this Core it is recommended that HDFS 2320, Basic Interpersonal Skills, be taken to fulfill the oral communication requirement.

College of Human Sciences Core Requirements. Students in the department must complete the follow
ing courses to fulfill the college's core requirements: HUSC 1100, Introduction to Human Sciences; HUSC 3214, Human Sciences Seminar; and HDFS 3320, The Contemporary Family, which may also count toward the required hours in the major.

Human Development and Family Studies Core Requirements. Students specializing in Human development and family studies must take the following core courses for a total of 18 credit hours: HDFS 2300, Gender Roles: Lifespan Developmental Perspective; HDFS 2303, Lifespan Human Development; HDFS 3301, Theories of Human Development and the Family; HDFS 3324, Dynamics of Family Interaction; HDFS 3350, Development in a Cross-Cultural Perspective; and HDFS 3390, Research Methods.

Support Course Requirements. Students are required to take the following support courses for the major in human development and family studies: PSY 1300, General Psychology; SOC 1301 or 1320, Introduction to Sociology or Current Social Problems, which also may be taken to fulfill the individual and group behavior in the university Core Curriculum; a basic computer literacy course ·EDIT 2318, C S 1300) which may also count toward the university Core Curriculum for technology and applied science.

Specialization Areas. Students must select one course in each of the following five blocks for a total of 15 credit hours:

Area 1: Childhood

HDFS 3306 Child and Adolescent Guidance

HDFS 3310 Prenatal and Infant Development

HDFS 3311 Laboratory Experiences with Infants and Toddlers

HDFS 3312 Development during Childhood

HDFS 3313 Laboratory Experiences with Young Children

HDFS 4306 Preparing Environments for Children

Area 2: Adolescence/Adult Development

W S 2300 Introduction to Women's Studies

HDFS 3316 Development in Adolescence

HDFS 3317 Problems of Adolescence

HDFS 3318 Development in Young Adulthood

HDFS 3319 Development in Middle Adulthood

HDFS 3332 Aging in the Family

Area 3: Addiction

HDFS 2125 Seminar in Addiction

HDFS 2327 Substance Abuse Prevention

HDFS 3325 Family Dynamics of Addiction

HDFS 3329 Addiction and Relationships

HDFS 4325 Treatment of Addictive Disorders

Area 4: Family Relationships

HDFS 2322 Courtship and Marriage

HDFS 3331 Parenting

HDFS 3321 Human Sexuality Through Family Life Cycle

HDFS 3322 Family in the Community

HDFS 3326 Families in Crisis

Area 5: Application/Research

HDFS 4000 Individual Study

HDFS 4314 Practicum in Human Development and Family Studies

HDFS 4320 Research in Human Development and Family Studies

HDFS 4330 Administration in Human Development and Family Studies

HDFS 4331 Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy

HDFS 4390 Program Development and Evaluation

HDFS 4343 Advanced Topics in Human Development and Family Studies

Departmental Electives. Fifteen credit hours of electives selected from the preceding blocks are required. Some students may want to concentrate their electives in one or two areas to demonstrate a specialization.

Human Development and Family Studies Teachers Certification. Human development and family studies majors can choose an option, which includes teachers certification in family and consumer sciences. The specialization provides a background in all family and consumer sciences subject areas and a certification to teach in Texas public school systems grade 8-12. Students seeking teacher certification must meet all requirements outlined in the Teacher Education section of this catalog. To be recommended for certification, graduates must achieve satisfactory performance on an examination prescribed by the State Board of Education (ExCET).

Human Development and Family Studies Teachers Certification Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
HUSC 11001ENGL 13023
ENGL 13013EDIT 23183
*MATH Elective3*Visual & Performing Arts 3
FCSE 21021POLS 23023
POLS 13013*Math. or Logical Reasoning 3
HDFS 2320 3 15
I D 1380 3
17
SECOND YEAR
FallSpring
Natural Lab Science4HDFS 33013
ENGL 23113HDFS 33203
FFP 13703FFP 23253
HIST 23003English Literature3
FADS 13033F&N 14104
EDSE 23003HIST 23013
19 19
THIRD YEAR
FallSpring
RHIM 3460 4**EDSE 4310, 43226
HDFS 33213**FCSE 3103, 43024
**FCSE 33013HDFS 3313 or 33113
HDFS 33123HDFS 33503
HDFS 33103HDFS 3306 or 33173
HDFS 33263 19
19
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
**FCSE 43083**FCSE 46016
**FCSE 4306 & 4103 4**FCSE 43043
HDFS 33903 9
HDFS 33223
HUSC 32142
HDFS 33313
18

TOTAL 136-151 hours, dependent on transfer student status.

*Choose from Core Curriculum requirements

**Admission into the Teachers Education Program is required to enroll, 2.5 GPA minimum.

HDFS 2320 required and can be applied to oral communication.

Early Childhood Teachers Certification. The early childhood specialization prepares professionals to work with children from infancy through 4th grade. A strong emphasis in child development provides the foundation for understanding the child as an individual, within the context of the family, and within the peer group and school settings. The program meets current Texas requirements for teacher certification and is accredited by the Texas Education agency and the National Council for Accreditation for Teacher Education. State Teacher certification is granted from Pre-kindergarten through the 4h elementary grade. See an academic advisor for updated certification requirements that may occur from recent legislative mandates. Admission to teacher certification is competitive and is based on overall grade point average (minimum 2.70) and satisfactory completion of all three portions of the TASP test. Students seeking teacher certification must meet all requirements outlined in the Teachers Education section of this catalog. To be recommended for certification, graduates must achieve satisfactory performance on the ExCET, an examination prescribed by the State Board of Educator Certification.

Early Childhood Teachers Certification Curriculum.

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
HUSC 11001ENGL 13023
ENGL 13013HDFS 23053
MATH 13203POLS 23023
POLS 13013*Natural Lab. Science4
GEOG 23513*Oral Communication3
**HDFS 23113MUSI 2301 or 33363
16 19
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
HIST 23003HIST 23013
English Elective3Natural Lab Science4
MATH 23703HDFS 33123
HDFS 33203HDFS 33104
HDFS 33013HDFS 3350 or3
ART 33723 EDEL 2300
18 19
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
EDSP 33003EDLL 33513
EDLL 33503EDLL 33523
EDIT 33183HDFS 3306 or EDEL 3320 3
HDFS 33133HIST 33103
MATH 33703HDFS 43063
HUSC 32143EDBL 33343
18 18
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
EDEL 4360, 43706EDEL 43303
EDEL 4375, EDLL 4380 6EDEC 40009
HLTH 3313 or ESS 3313 3 12
15

TOTAL 130-146, hours, dependent on transfer student status.

*Choose from Core Curriculum requirements.

**HDFS 2320 required and can be applied to oral communication.

Courses in Human Development and Family Studies. (HDFS)

2125. Seminar in Addiction (1:1:3). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Philosophy and process of recovery from addiction. Intensive seminar and laboratory experience. May be repeated for credit.

2300. Gender Roles: Life Span Developmental Perspectives (3:3:0). Introduction to gender role concepts and to the impact of gender and gender role systems on individual and family developmental processes.

2303. Life Span Human Development (3:3:0). Introduction to the theories, processes, and enhancement of development for infants, young children, adolescents, and adults.

2305. Strategies of Studying Human Development (3:3:0). Observing, recording behavior, and reviewing techniques used in the study of human development throughout the life span.

2311. Introduction to Early Childhood (3:3:0). Introduction to the profession of early childhood focusing on developmentally appropriate practice, historical influences, program models, and current issues including legislation, public policy, and ethics.

2320. Basic Interpersonal Skills (3:3:0). The study and application of interpersonal skills as they relate to various age levels and social contexts.

2322. Courtship and Marriage (3:3:0). Designed to consider the role of interpersonal relationships of dating, courtship, and marriage.

2327. Substance Abuse Prevention (3:3:0). Introduction to different perspectives on current research and methodologies in the field of substance abuse.

3301. Theories of Human Development and the Family (3:3:0). Survey of theories of human development with emphasis upon their implications for parenting, program development, and services. (Writing Intensive)

3306. Child and Adolescent Guidance (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HDFS 3301. Development of strategies for promoting self-discipline, creative capacities, and positive relationships with children and adolescents.

3310. Prenatal and Infant Development (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HDFS 3301. Study of how to promote the psychomotor, social-emotional, and cognitive-language development of infants from the prenatal period through the first two years in their interactions with caregivers, peers, and the environment.

3311. Laboratory Experiences with Infants and Toddlers (3:1:4). Prerequisite or concurrent: HDFS 3310. Supervised experiences with infants and toddlers.

3312. Development During Childhood (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HDFS 3301. Examination of psychomotor, social-emotional, and cognitive-language development during childhood.

3313. Laboratory Experiences with Young Children (3:1:4). Prerequisite or concurrent: HDFS 3312. Supervised experiences with young children.

3316. Development in Adolescence (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HDFS 3301. Enhancing the psychosocial, social-emotional, and cognitive-language development of adolescents within their interactions with peers, adults, and the culture.

3317. Problems of Adolescence (3:3:0). Overview of problems associated with the adolescent years and training in use of helping skills appropriate for adolescent populations.

3318. Development in Young Adulthood (3:3:0). Examination of individual developmental processes during the transition to adulthood and the first two decades of adult life.

3319. Development in Middle Adulthood (3:3:0). Examination of individual developmental processes from the midlife transition through the middle years of adult life.

3320. The Contemporary Family (3:3:0). Analysis of family interaction patterns with an introduction to family research. A study of family heritage, development, and networks emphasizing the successful family and sociocultural variations of family forms. (Writing Intensive)

3321. Human Sexuality Through Family Life Cycle (3:3:0). Human sexuality from a life cycle perspective, with an emphasis on developmental, familial, and societal factors that influence individual sexuality.

3322. The Family in the Community (3:3:0). Study of community resources as they relate to welfare of children and families.

3324. Dynamics of Family Interaction (3:3:0). Examination of interpersonal processes in the family and other intimate groups. Conceptual analysis of family interaction patternse.g., communication, roles, relationships, power, decision-making, love, conflict.

3325. Family Dynamics of Addiction (3:3:0). An examination of the family system with specific reference to the causes and effects of chemical abuse and addiction.

3326. Families in Crisis (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Examination of theories and strategies for helping families deal productively with crises. Consideration of child exceptionality, child abuse, unemployment, divorce, rape, alcoholism, death, and other crisis events.

3329. Addiction and Relationships (3:3:0). Prerequisite: F S 3325. Addicted persons have difficulties with intimate relationships. Relationships can also be a specific addiction. This course examines addiction, relationships, and addictive relationships.

3331. Parenting (3:3:0). Basic principles and skills for parent effectiveness. Includes strategies for inclusion of parents in the developmental-educational processes of the child.

3332. Aging in the Family (3:3:0). Needs that arise from changes in family relationships, living arrangements, income, and employment.

3350. Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3:3:0). Critical examination of developmental and family theory research across a diverse range of cultures.

3390. Research Methods in Human Development and Family Studies (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HDFS 3320. Introduction to methods of research in human development and family studies. (Writing Intensive)

4000. Individual Study (V1-6). May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

4306. Preparing Environments for Children (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HDFS 3311 or 3313. Utilizing developmental principles acquired by the student in previous child development courses, this course focuses on the application of these principles to the design of environments for children.

4314. Practicum in Human Development and Family Studies (3). Prerequisite: Senior standing. Supervised experiences in established career-related positions; focus selected on basis of professional interest. May be repeated once for credit.

4320. Research in Human Development and Family Studies (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HDFS 3390 or consent of instructor. Supervised independent work in selected areas. May be repeated once for credit.

4325. Treatment of Addictive Disorders (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HDFS 3325. Survey of the current treatment philosophies and programs designed to assist individuals and families affected by addictive disorders.

4330. Administration in Human Development and Family Studies (3:3:0). Prerequisite: 12 hours in department. This course includes application of administrative models, leadership attributes, research findings, and assessments of skills of human service settings.

4331. Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy (3:3:0). An experiential course with emphasis on developing skills which apply to interview situations. A problem-centered approach to family needs.

4343. Advanced Topics in Human Development and Family Studies (3:3:0). This course focuses on recent developments in theory, philosophy, research, and/or applied approaches to human development and family studies.

4390. Program Development and Evaluation (3:3:0). Knowledge and experience in the practice for program development and evaluation. Class evaluates an ongoing program.


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