Interdepartmental, Interdisciplinary,

and Special Programs

Asian Pacific Rim Area Studies. An interdisciplinary minor in Asian Pacific Rim Area Studies for a baccalaureate degree consists of related work from several departments. It is appropriate for students who wish to gain a better and broader understanding of the countries and cultures in the Asian Pacific Rim region. The program is designed to prepare students for further study in several fields and to provide them with basic qualifications for a wide variety of professional and/or academic careers requiring more specific knowledge of this increasingly important region and its peoples.

The required 18 hours of course work may be taken from designated courses in anthropology, architecture, Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese languages, economics, geography, history, philosophy, political science, and sociology. This 18 hour requirement may not include courses taken to fulfill requirements in the student's major field. Students can obtain further information from the program's director, Professor Yung-mei Tsai, 162 Holden Hall, (806) 742-2416 Ext. 2400; FAX (806) 742-1088; E-Mail CTYMT@TTACS.TTU.EDU.

Classical Studies. A minor in classical studies for a baccalaureate degree is composed of courses involving the ancient Greco-Roman Civilization. Students may obtain further information from the Director of Classical Studies, James E. Holland, Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures, 262 Foreign Language Building.

The minor is offered to students wishing to gain understanding of the Classical Mediterranean culture, as a model of cultural synthesis, as a repository of basic human values, and as a base for understanding our own Western culture.

Eighteen hours of course work are required, 9 from CLAS 1320, 1330, 3320, 3330, and 3350. The remaining hours must be chosen from Greek (above 1302 level), Latin (above 1402 level), ART 3310, ENGL 4336, HIST 3340, 4341, PHIL 3301, and POLS 3330.

The 18 hours may not include courses taken to fulfill requirements in the student's major field.

Community and Urban Studies. The College of Arts and Sciences offers an interdisciplinary minor in community and urban studies. The program consists of an integrated course of study which provides the student with a conceptual and theoretical foundation for recognizing and approaching urban problems. An opportunity is also provided for observation and analysis of community and urban affairs. The program includes core courses in architecture, economics, geography, history, political science, and sociology and elective courses in architecture, business administration, economics, geography, history, landscape architecture, political science, sociology, and social work. Additional information may be obtained from the Director, Dr. Claud Davidson, Department of Economics and Geography, 215 Holden Hall.

Comparative Literature. The Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures offers a comparative literature minor for the Bachelor of Arts degree. The minor consists of 18 hours of courses, of which 3 hours must be at the 4000-level. Students may apply 6 hours of sophomore-level course work from either the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures or the Department of English if such course work is not in the student's major field. Students not majoring in a foreign language must complete at least 3 hours at the junior or senior-level in a foreign language. Comparative literature minors must take at least 6 hours from the following courses: CLAS 2301, 3350, C LT 3302, 3334, 4305, ENGL 4334, 4335, HUM 2301, 2302. Individual minor programs are arranged by the student and the Director of the Program on Comparative Literature. This minor may not include course work in the student's major field unless such course work is over and above the minimum catalog requirements for the major. Additional information may be obtained from the Director, Dr. Paul Allen Miller, Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures.

Courses in Comparative Literature. (C LT)

2301. The Epic in the Western Tradition (3:3:0). Introduction to the epic genre by examining a range of western literature, including both primary and secondary epics.

3302. Literary Traditions (3:3:0). Students will examine the history of a given literary tradition in several national literatures, e.g., lyric, the novel, and tragedy.

3334. Literatures and Cultures of Africa, Asia, or Latin America (3:3:0). This course will examine the literatures and cultures of Africa, Asia, and/or Latin America.

4305. Contemporary Theories of Cultural Meaning (3:3:0). Introduction to the most important contemporary theories on the nature and origin of meaning in culture.

Environmental Studies. The college offers an interdisciplinary minor in environmental studies. This minor is nontechnical in nature and is specifically designed for students seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree. Its focus is on the interaction of humans and the natural environment and the consequences of that interaction. The environmental studies minor does not seek to train professional environmentalists, but in combination with existing major programs it will give the student a broad foundation for more advanced environmental studies programs, professional work in law, regional planning or resource management, various environmental positions in government, business, or teaching. The plan will also provide students with a better understanding of basic ecology and the nature of environmental problems so that they can make more knowledgeable value judgments on environmental issues, a vital concern in the contemporary world. The minor consists of 18 hours of required and elective courses from such departments as Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work; Biological Sciences; Economics and Geography; Geosciences; and History; and from some departments in Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. Additional information concerning the environmental studies minor may be obtained from the Director, Dr. Otis Templer, Department of Economics and Geography.

Ethnic Studies. The college offers an interdisciplinary minor in ethnic studies. The goals of the program are to increase students' understanding of the nature and development of race relations and to stimulate a greater sense of dignity for minority students. Students may, if they wish, specialize in African-American, Mexican-American, or Native-American studies. All students minoring in ethnic studies must complete at least 18 hours in ethnic content courses. No more than three courses may be taken in one department. Electives in the program include: ANTH 1301, 2301, 2302, 3325, 3331, 3345, 3347, 3371, 4372, ART 3311, 4315, COMS 3306, ENGL 3322, HIST 3311, 3318, 3324, 3325, 3326, 3395, 4326, 4383, MUHL 3304, PSY 3305, SOC 3324, 4362, SPAN 4320, 4360. Additional information may be obtained from the Director, Dr. Richard Gomez, College of Education.

Family Life Studies. The colleges of Arts and Sciences and Human Sciences jointly offer an interdisciplinary minor in family life studies. The program involves an integrated course of study and provides the student with a variety of perspectives on the family. The minor consists of 18 hours chosen from several disciplines. No more than 6 hours may be taken from any one department. Courses counted toward the major will not count toward the minor. At least 6 hours must be at the junior-senior level.

Courses may be selected from the following: HLTH 1300, 1305, 1307, 2302, 3313, 3314, HIST 3322, 3323, 3341, 4325, PSY 3341, 4300, 4301, 4310, SOC 2331, 3325, 3331, 4373, SW 3311, 3312, HD 2303, 3301, FS 2322, 3320, 3321, 3322, 3324, 3326, 3332, HDFS 3331, 3350, FFP 1370, 3325, 3375. Additional information about the minor may be obtained from Dr. Charlotte Dunham, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work.

General Studies. For a description of the General Studies degree program, see "Bachelor of General Studies" in the General Degree Requirements section.

Courses in General Studies. (GST)

2001. General Studies Abroad (V1-12). Individual studies in interdisciplinary, international, and multicultural experiences.

2300. Introduction to General Studies (3). Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and director's consent. An individual studies course to assist the student in developing an interdisciplinary plan of study for the Bachelor of General Studies degree.

4300. Senior Thesis or Project (3). Preparation of a senior thesis or project for the Bachelor of General Studies degree. Students should take the course the first long semester of the senior year. May be repeated for credit with the approval of Director of General Studies.

Humanities. The "humanities" include all academic disciplines that study the creative works of human beingsliterary, musical, philosophical, religious, theatrical, and artisticcreatively expressing our visions of life and values for living, which offer us both delight and wisdom. For students who wish to combine and explore several humanities disciplines, the interdisciplinary humanities program offers a flexible and attractive minor.

In the humanities 18-hour minor, the student first takes the two 3-hour introductory courses: HUM 2301 and 2302 (see below). Under the director's counsel, the student then takes four advanced courses related to a period of his or her choice: Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, Nineteenth Century, or Twentieth Century. For interdisciplinary richness, the student selects these four courses from the varied offerings of any three of these participating areas: anthropology, architecture, art, classical and modern languages and literatures, comparative literature, English, history, music, philosophy, and theatre arts.

For students majoring in the sciences or professions, the interdisciplinary humanities minor offers an enriching educational experience. For students already majoring in a single discipline among the humanities, this minor provides a broader awareness of the background of ideas and arts that shape our world. The introductory humanities courses also fulfill general requirements and provide elective credit.

For more information, contact the Director of Humanities: Dr. Edward George, 212 Foreign Language Bldg.

Courses in Humanities. (HUM)

2301. Introduction to Humanities (3:3:0). An exploration of human values, primarily significant to western civilization, in great works of literature, philosophy, and the arts from the classical Greek and Roman eras to the Renaissance. [HUMA 1301]

2302. Introduction to Humanities (3:3:0). The exploration of contemporary human values through great works of literature, philosophy, and the arts from the Renaissance to the present. [HUMA 1302]

International Studies. An interdisciplinary minor in international studies is offered for students who wish to gain an understanding of how the nations of the world are economically, politically, socially, and culturally interdependent. The minor is made up of a 9-hour core of required courses and 9 hours of electives. The core courses are ECO 3333, International Economics; GEOG 3360, Geography of Mankind; and POLS 3361, International Politics. An advisor may allow substitutions in the core when it can be shown that they fit in with the student's major program and academic objectives. Elective courses are selected from among courses that deal with international topics in departments in the College of Arts and Sciences. Courses from other colleges may be accepted if they have been previously approved by the program advisors. For further information, consult one of the following advisors: Dr. Gary Elbow or Dr. Roger Troub, Department of Economics and Geography.

Latin American Area Studies. A major in Latin American Area Studies for a Bachelor of Arts degree consists of course work in several departments. It requires 30 semester hours, which must be completed in the three areas and five fields indicated below. Nine hours must be taken in each area, and at least 3 hours must be taken in each field. In addition, students must take one of the interdisciplinary Latin American Area Studies courses: LAAS 2300 or 4300. If both LAAS 2300 and 4300 are taken, one of these courses may be substituted for a course in one of the five fields. A minimum of 9 hours of courses in the major and 6 hours in the minor must be taken in residence at Texas Tech University. Additional information and a list of courses approved for the major may be obtained from the program director, Dr. Philip A. Dennis, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work.

Area I (9 hours)

First field: Upper division Latin American content courses in Spanish (Portuguese may be substituted for up to 6 hours of this requirement).

Area II (9 hours)

First field: Latin American anthropology; art courses.

Second field: Latin American geography; economics courses.

Area III (9 hours)

First field: Latin American history courses.

Second field: Latin American political science courses.

Interdisciplinary Course (3 hours)

LAAS 2300 or 4300

With prior approval, students may plan programs at variance with the above requirements to meet their special interests.

A minor in Latin American Area Studies consists of 18 hours of Latin American content courses taken from those approved for the major in this program. These 18 hours may not include work in the student's major field and must be taken in at least three of the five fields represented in the program. Either LAAS 2300 or 4300 is recommended.

In addition, the standard requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree must be met.

Courses in Latin American Area Studies. (LAAS)

2300. Latin America: An Interdisciplinary Introduction (3:3:0). A basic survey of Latin American culture and civilization.

4300. Seminar in Latin American Studies (3:3:0). Interdisciplinary studies in selected Latin American topics. Readings and lectures in English.

Linguistics. The Interdepartmental Committee on Linguistics offers a minor in linguistics for the B.A. degree. The minor consists of 18 hours of required and elective courses drawn from the departments of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures; Communication Studies; English; Mass Communications; Philosophy; Psychology; Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work; and the Division of Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education. Additional information may be obtained from the committee chairperson, Dr. Rosslyn Smith, Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures.

Linguistics is concerned with (1) the scientific description and analysis of languages; (2) the study of language in its social and cultural context; (3) the evolution and historical development of language; (4) the formal study of communication systems involving the acquisition and use of language; (5) the relation of language to literature, philosophy, and other fields in the humanities; and (6) human biology and neurology as they affect the use of language. Linguistics shares interests with speech science, psychology, anthropology, sociology, literature, philosophy, and other fields of study. It is, therefore, an interesting and useful minor area for students majoring in these fields and one that can, in many cases, help students in developing an area of academic or professional specialization.

The linguistics minor for the B.A. is made up of 18 hours of courses. Of these, it is required that 3 hours be drawn from Group A (general and introductory linguistics courses), 3 hours from Group B (courses dealing intensively with a single language or a restricted group of languages), at least 3 hours from Group C (courses dealing with applied uses of linguistics and historical linguistics), and 3 hours from group D (courses relating linguistics to other fields). The remaining 6 hours may be taken from any group.

Group A--ANTH 3305, ENGL 3371.

Group B--ENGL 3370, FREN 4302, 4306, GERM 4301, LAT 4302, SPAN 4302, 4303.

Group C--EDRD 4343, ENGL 4372, 4373, LING 4311, 4335.

Group D--ANTH 3351, COMS 3306, EDBL 3334, MCOM 3300, PHIL 4310, 4331, PSY 4324.

Prelaw. Interested students should be aware that Texas Tech University does not have a prelaw major program leading directly to law school. Schools of law do not specify particular majors or courses as part of their admission requirements. Instead, they expect applicants to be well-grounded in the fundamentals of a broad liberal education, to be intellectually mature, and to be able to read, write, and think analytically. Thus, students must choose a degree program and receive a bachelor's degree in one of the established degree programs in the College of Arts and Sciences or elsewhere in the University. This major field should be chosen by the beginning of the junior year.

Prelaw students should constantly keep in mind the various requirements for the bachelor's degree.

Dr. Otis W. Templer, Department of Economics and Geography, Dr. M. Catherine Miller, Department of History, and Dr. Neale J. Pearson, Department of Political Science, are the prelaw advisors for students within the College of Arts and Sciences. Regardless of their major academic field, prelaw students should consult one of these advisors for counseling and guidance in planning their programs.

Preprofessional Health Careers. Professional health school programs include dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, and allied health sciences.

Most professional school programs in the field of health care require prior to admission the completion of specific college level science and general education courses. The Preprofessional Health Careers Office maintains a collection of professional school catalogs and related information on various health careers. The Preprofessional Health Careers Office is located in the Chemistry Building, Room 340; the telephone number is 742-3078.

Individual advising regarding the preparation of a student for admission to professional health schools is done by advisors in the Preprofessional Health Careers Office up to the time when the student files a degree plan for his or her baccalaureate degree. Most professional health career schools do not specify particular majors as part of their admission requirements, and Texas Tech University does not offer degrees in premedicine, predentistry, or other prehealth areas. Therefore, each preprofessional health career student who intends to earn a baccalaureate degree must choose a major by the junior year and complete the degree requirements for that major while also completing the undergraduate course requirements for admission into the preprofessional health school that he or she intends to enter. Each preprofessional health career student is advised to choose a major offered by any of the colleges in the University that is suited to his or her individual interests and abilities and which will offer alternative career options in the event that initial career plans change.

Courses listed as prerequisites for professional school programs must be college-level courses taken for letter grades. However, credit by examination, using the standardized tests described in this catalog, is also acceptable for certain courses. Science courses required by preprofessional health schools are those required of science majors. Each student is responsible for knowing any special requirements of the professional schools which he or she plans to attend.

The Preprofessional Health Careers Committee, as a courtesy, will assist Texas Tech University students in coordinating their evaluation packets for application to schools of dentistry, medicine, or optometry. Evaluation forms are available in the Preprofessional Health Careers Office located in the Chemistry Building, Room 340.

Predentistry

The minimum admission requirements for most dental schools in the United States are 16 semester hours of biology, 8 semester hours of general chemistry, 8 semester hours of organic chemistry, 8 semester hours of physics, and 6 semester hours of English. Applicants to dental schools are required to take the Dental Admission Test and to submit their applications one year prior to the date of the planned matriculation. For admission requirements of a specific dental school, students should consult the latest edition of Admission Requirements of United States and Canadian Dental Schools or the dental school catalog. Students should plan to complete a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choice before entering dental school, although a formal minimum of 90 semester hours is stated for some schools.

Premedicine

The minimum admission requirements for most medical schools in the United States are at least 3 years of study (90 semester hours) in an accredited college or university including 6 semester hours of English, 3 semester hours of calculus, 16 semester hours of biology, 8 semester hours of general chemistry, 8 semester hours of organic chemistry, and 8 semester hours of physics.

All applicants to medical schools are required to take the Medical College Admission Test and submit their applications to the schools approximately one year prior to the date of the planned entrance. For admission requirements to a specific medical school, students should consult the latest edition of Medical School Admission Requirements.

Students should plan to complete a bachelor's degree in the field of their choice before entering medical school, although not all schools require a degree.

Premedical and predental students may obtain a baccalaureate degree in one of two ways.

A.The degree may be obtained by completing the requirements as stated in the catalog for the degree desired. The major selected depends on the interest of the student. This major will usually be in one of the sciences;
however, other majors are acceptable and may be chosen in colleges other than the College of Arts and Sciences.

B.The Arts and Sciences B.A. or B.S. degree may be obtained by completing 3 years of work totaling a minimum of 100 semester hours in the College of Arts and Sciences and then graduating from an accredited U.S. or Canadian school of medicine, osteopathy, or dentistry. The following regulations apply:

1. Of the three years of preprofessional work, at least the junior year must be completed in residence at Texas Tech. This minimum will apply to transfer students from other colleges, provided they have satisfactorily completed the work outlined in the freshman and sophomore years or its equivalent.

2. The three years of work must satisfy all graduation requirements for the B.A. or B.S. degree at Texas Tech, with the exception of the requirements in the minor area of study.

3. The applicant for a degree under this plan must submit properly approved credentials from an accredited U.S. or Canadian school of medicine, osteopathy, or dentistry to the effect that the applicant has completed satisfactorily the work leading to a degree of Doctor of Medicine or Doctor of Dental Surgery. Evidence of the degree will substitute for the baccalaureate degree requirements in a major field.

Preoptometry

Admission requirements differ among the various professional schools. These courses fulfill requirements in general: 8 semester hours of biology, 8 semester hours of general chemistry, 8 semester hours of organic chemistry, 8 semester hours of physics, 4 semester hours of microbiology, 4 semester hours of physiology, 6 semester hours of mathematics including 3 semester hours of calculus, 3 semester hours of biochemistry, 3 semester hours of statistics, 3 semester hours of general psychology, 12 semester hours of English, 6 semester hours of U.S. history, and 6 semester hours of political science. Other recommended courses are cultural anthropology, logic, and ethics. Students should complete 90 or more semester hours and take the Optometry College Admission Test before applying to the professional schools. Students should plan to complete a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choice before entering optometry school, although a formal minimum of 90 semester hours is stated for some schools. At least 60 of the 90 semester hours must be math and science courses.

Prepharmacy

The specific admission requirements for schools of pharmacy differ, but most include 8 semester hours of biology; 8 semester hours of general chemistry; 8 semester hours of organic chemistry; 8 semester hours of physics; 4 semester hours of microbiology; 3 semester hours of calculus; 3 semester hours of statistical methods; 9 semester hours of English; 6 semester hours of writing courses and 3 semester hours of literature; 3 semester hours of economics, 3 semester hours of public speaking; and 15 semester hours spread across humanities and social sciences. Students should complete 70 or more hours of course work and take the Pharmacy College Admission Test before applying to the professional schools.

Allied Health

Preclinical laboratory science, precommunication disorders, preoccupational therapy, and prephysical therapy programs consist of the 60 to 90 semester hours of preprofessional course work required of a student before being admitted to the professional level in a school of allied health. Most programs require a minimum of 6 to 9 semester hours of English, 6 semester hours each of U.S. history and political science, and 8 semester hours each of biology, chemistry, and physics. Requirements for additional courses in advanced biology and chemistry, zoology, computer science, mathematics, anthropology, psychology, sociology, speech, and statistics vary with each program and with each school of allied health.

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Allied Health accepts both entering freshmen for the preprofessional level (CLS only) and transfer students for the professional level.

Contact the TTUHSC School of Allied Health for admission information and refer to its section in this catalog.

Prenursing

Students desiring admission to the Texas Tech University Health Sciences School of Nursing should apply directly to that program as well as to Texas Tech University. Application to the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing is a separate application from the Texas Tech University application.

Students seeking admission to either diploma or collegiate programs in nursing other than at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center may enroll in a prenursing curriculum. The advisor will assist prenursing students in the selection of appropriate courses. Course requirements vary among nursing schools, but most include English, psychology, sociology, chemistry, zoology, microbiology, statistics, and nutrition. Most collegiate programs also require credits in American history and political science.

In order to avoid complications in transferring, prenursing students should not take courses pass-fail.

Other Preprofessional Health Careers

Students who plan other preprofessional programs such as predental hygiene, preradiologic technology, and prephysician assistant should consult an advisor in the Preprofessional Health Careers office for further information.

Religion Studies. A minor in religion studies for a baccalaureate degree is composed of courses drawn from several departments in the college. Students can obtain further information from the director of the program, Dr. D. Paul Johnson, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, 158 Holden Hall.

The minor is offered to students who wish to enhance their understanding of religion by studying it from a variety of academic perspectives. The program is intended to enable students to place their conception of religion in the broader frameworks of several academic disciplines.

Eighteen hours of course work are necessary to complete the minor, including courses from at least three disciplines. Four of the courses in the minor must be from the core courses and such courses must be taken from at least two disciplines. Courses taken must reflect the study of at least two religious traditions. The 18 hours may not include courses taken to fulfill requirements in the student's major.

Core Courses: ANTH 3323, CLAS 1320, 3350, ENGL 3332, 3333, HIST 3328, 3344, 3391, 4347, 4349, PHIL 3302, 3324, POLS 3339, SOC 4331.

Other Courses: ANTH 3325, 3346, ART 3313, 3317, 3318, ENGL 4306, HIST 3340, 3348, 3395, 3398, 4374, PHIL 2320, POLS 3330, 3332.

Departmental Independent Studies: Students may use one independent topics course for the minor when the topic is religion. Prior to registration, the student should consult the director of the program concerning availability of courses and the student's progress in the minor.

Russian Language and Area Studies. A major or minor in Russian Language and Area Studies for a Bachelor of Arts degree consists of integrated course work in several departments. Students can obtain further information from the Acting Director of the program, Dr. Lewis Tracy, Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures.

The degree is offered to students who wish to study the Russian language and aspects of culture, literature, history, politics, economic relations, and society in Tsarist Russia, the Soviet Union, and in post-Soviet Russia. The program is intended to give students qualifications for various types of professional work that require knowledge of Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States and to prepare motivated students for further study.

The major requires 33 semester hours of course work. RUSN 1401 and 1402 are prerequisites of, but do not count towards, the major or minor. RUSN 2301, 2302 (or their equivalents), and 2303 are required for all students seeking a major. In addition, majors need to take 24 hours of approved courses offered by the Departments of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures, Economics and Geography, History, and Political Science. Prior to enrolling in the program and to registering for courses, students should consult the director of the program.

For the minor, 18 hours of course work is necessary, taken from courses approved for the major. RUSN 2301 and 2302 (or their equivalents) are required for all students seeking a minor.

Courses taken for the Russian Language and Area Studies major or minor may not be used to satisfy the requirements for the student's other major or minor.

In addition, the standard requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree must be met.

Substance Abuse Studies. The Colleges of Human Sciences and Arts and Sciences jointly offer an interdisciplinary minor in Substance Abuse Studies (SAS). This minor is designed for students with professional, academic, or personal interest in addictive disorders. It will provide students with an understanding of the physiological, psychological, societal, and familial factors contributing to addiction and the recovery from addiction.

For specific details, see the statement on Substance Abuse Studies in the College of Human Sciences section of this catalog. Additional information may be obtained from the Program Director, Dr. Carl Andersen, Department of Human Development and Family Studies.


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