Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Professor D. Max Roundhill, Chairperson.

Horn Professors Bartsch, Dasgupta, Knaff, and Shine; Welch Professor Robinson; Professors Holwerda, Nes, and Redington; Associate Professors Birney, Casadonte, Gellene, Harman, Headley, Marx, Metz, Quitevis, Shelly, and Whittlesey; Assistant Professors Bornhop, Korzeniewski, Makhatadze, and Shaw; Adjunct Faculty: Karlsson, Menzel, Reid, and Spallholz.

This department supervises the following degree programs: CHEMISTRY, Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy; BIOCHEMISTRY, Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. Those students seeking graduate degrees may specialize in analytical, inorganic, organic, or physical chemistry, chemical education, chemical physics, or biochemistry.

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers four undergraduate degree programs in chemistry and biochemistry. One of these degree programs will be appropriate for the student who wishes to pursue a professional career in chemistry or biochemistry or for one who desires a strong undergraduate background in the central sciences of chemistry and biochemistry as preparation for other interests such as health-related professional schools, teaching, or sales. The undergraduate advisor assists the student in selecting courses, fulfilling degree requirements, and career counseling. The department has added honors-level courses to the curriculum. These courses will substitute for non-honors equivalents. Qualified students, only, may enroll in these courses. See the undergraduate advisor for details. Highly motivated undergraduate chemistry or biochemistry majors may be interested in conducting an individual research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Such students may wish to obtain a working knowledge of research methods in a specialized area, or simply desire familiarity with a wide range of research instrumentation and techniques. The department also has a very active chapter of the Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society.

Students interested in a minor in chemistry should consult with the departmental minor advisor. A minor requires a minimum of 19 hours in chemistry with at least 4 of those hours being laboratory credit.

Chemistry. The undergraduate student may take courses leading to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry. Either program offers a wide choice of minor subjects, not only in the College of Arts and Sciences, but in the other colleges as well. Thus, to the areas of biology, geology, mathematics, and physics traditionally associated with chemistry as suitable minors are added such compatible subjects as chemical engineering, computer science, economics, environmental studies, industrial engineering, textile engineering, business, agricultural economics, soil science, food and nutrition, and secondary education, among others. It is necessary that the student interested in these or other minors, especially those outside the College of Arts and Sciences, consult the undergraduate advisor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry prior to registration for a particular minor program. Introductory courses CHEM 1105, 1106, 1301, 1303, 1306, 3103, and 3303 cannot be counted towards a minor in chemistry.

The Bachelor of Science degree prepares a student for graduate school or a career as a professional chemist. This degree program is technically oriented, requiring greater depth of mathematics, physics, computer science, and chemistry than does the Bachelor of Arts degree. With the heavier chemistry requirement in the B.S. degree program, the student has fewer elective courses for other interests. Completion of the B.S. degree curriculum leads to automatic certification of a student as the recipient of a professional degree by the American Chemical Society. The minimum required for the B.S. is 126 hours and 125 hours for the B.A. degrees in chemistry and biochemistry.

Chemistry Curriculum, B.S. Degree.

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
CHEM 1307, Prin. of Chem. I3 CHEM 1308, Prin. of Chem. II3
CHEM 1107, Prin. of Chem. I (Lab.)1 CHEM 1108, Prin. of Chem. II (Lab.)1
ENGL 1301, Ess. Coll. Rhetoric3ENGL 1302, Adv. Coll. Rhetoric3
American History3 American History3
*MATH 1351, Calculus I3MATH 1352, Calculus II3
**Science elect.4 **Science elect. 4
Health and Physical Fitness1Health and Physical Fitness1
18 18
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
CHEM 3305, Org. Chem. Lect. I3 CHEM 3306, Org. Chem. Lect. II3
CHEM 3105, Org. Chem. Lab. I1CHEM 3106, Org. Chem. Lab. II1
CHEM 2301, Desc. Inorg. Chem.3CHEM 2501, Anal. Chemistry5
MATH 2350, Calculus III3PHYS 2301, Prin. of Physics II3
PHYS 1308, Prin. of Physics I3 PHYS 1106, Prin. of Phys. II (Lab.)1
PHYS 1105, Prin. of Phys. I (Lab.)1Minor3-4
Free elective 3 16-17
17
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
CHEM 3201, Adv. Org. Chem. Lab.2CHEM 3308, Phys. Chem. II3
CHEM 3307, Phys. Chem. I3CHEM 3108, Phys. Chem. Lab. II1
CHEM 3107, Phys. Chem. Lab. I1 CHEM 4412, Instr. Analysis4
Foreign language 5 +English3
POLS 1301, Amer. Govt., Org.3 Foreign language 5
Minor 3-4 POLS 2302, Amer. Pub. Pol.3
17-18 19
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
+English 3 CHEM 4105, Inorg. Chem. Lab.1
Minor 3 CHEM 4309, Inorg. Chem. II3
#Indiv. or group behav.3 Minor0-6
++Senior elective (chemistry)3-6 #Oral communication 3
Foreign language 3 ++Senior elective (chemistry)0-3
15-18 Foreign language 3
10-19

A total of 48 hours of chemistry is required.

*Adequate training in algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry is a prerequisite for calculus. The student in doubt about which mathematics courses to take in the first year must consult with the departmental undergraduate advisor.

**The science elective must be either BIOL 1401 (Biology of Plants) and BIOL 1402 (Biology of Animals) [or BIOL 1403, 1404 (Biology I and II)] or GEOL 1303, 1101 (Physical Geology) and GEOL 1304, 1102 (Historical Geology).

Select from Health and Physical Fitness section of the Arts and Sciences General Degree Requirements.

+Two courses to be chosen from ENGL 2301, 2302, 2305, 2306, and 2307. May be applied towards General Education Requirement for Humanities.

++Two electives chosen from CHEM 4000 (up to 3 hours), 4300, 4302, 4303, 4310.

#Select from Category C, General Education Requirement.

Chemistry Curriculum, B.A. Degree.

This curriculum is primarily designed for the student who is interested in using an undergraduate major in chemistry as the background for a career in such fields as medicine, dentistry, environmental protection, clinical and pharmacological chemistry, technical sales, chemical patent law, etc., where quite extensive undergraduate training in chemistry is either valuable or essential. It also provides a sufficient background in chemistry so that a student upon graduation can seek employment as a chemist in an industrial laboratory or enter a graduate program leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree in chemistry.

CHEM 1307, 1308 (or 1301, 1307, 1308), 1107, 1108,

2301, 2401, 3305, 3306, 3105, 3106, 3307, 3107,

4412, and 3 hours to be chosen from 3308, 3108, 4302,

4303, 4105, 4309, and 4310 --34 hours

MATH 1350 (if needed), 1351, 1352 --6 hours

PHYS 1306, 1307 (or 1308, 2301) and 1103, 1104 (or 1105, 1106) --8 hours

English --12 hours

American history --6 hours

POLS 1301, 2302 --6 hours

Social or behavioral sciences --6 hours

Humanities --6 hours

Oral Communication --3 hours

Fine arts --6 hours

Foreign language --6-16 hours

Health and Physical Fitness --2 hours

Minor requirements and free electives to total a minimum of 130 hours

Biochemistry. Both the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degree programs in biochemistry have a common objective of providing general education and training in the chemical aspects of biological systems through a combination of course work in biochemistry, chemistry, and biology.

Biochemistry Curriculum, B.S. Degree. This degree program will prepare an undergraduate student for graduate study in biochemistry and related disciplines, for entry into medical or dental school, or for employment in industrial or governmental laboratories in which graduate training is not required. Completion of the B.S. degree curriculum incorporates a minor in biology.

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
CHEM 1307, Prin. of Chem. I3 CHEM 1308, Prin. of Chem. II3
CHEM 1107, Prin. of Chem. I (Lab.)1 CHEM 1108, Prin. of Chem. II (Lab.)1
BIOL 1403, Biology I 4 BIOL 1404, Biology II4
ENGL 1301, Ess. Coll. Rhetoric3 ENGL 1302, Adv. Coll. Rhetoric3
American History 3 American History 3
*MATH 1351, Calculus I3 MATH 1352, Calculus II3
**Health and Physical Fitness1 **Health and Physical Fitness1
18 18
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
CHEM 3305, Org. Chem. I3 CHEM 3306, Org. Chem. II3
CHEM 3105, Org. Chem. Lab. I1 CHEM 3106, Org. Chem. Lab. II1
BIOL 3301, Genetics 3 CHEM 2501, Analyt. Chem.5
PHYS 1308, Prin. of Physics I3 PHYS 2301, Prin. of Phys. II3
PHYS 1105, Prin. of Phys. I (Lab.)1 PHYS 1106, Prin. of Phys. II (Lab.)1
Foreign Language 5 Foreign Language 5
Free elective 3 18
19
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
CHEM 3311, Biol. Chem I3 CHEM 3312, Biol. Chem. II3
MBIO 3401, Prin. of Micro.4 CHEM 3313, Biol. Chem. Lab.3
English 3 +Senior elective 3-4
Foreign Language 3 English 3
13 Foreign Language 3
15-16
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
CHEM 4311, Phys. Chem. Biol. Sci.3 CHEM 4412, Instr. Analysis4
POLS 1301, Amer. Govt., Org.3 CHEM 4312, Phys. Biochem.3
+Senior elective 3-4 POLS 2302, Amer. Pub. Pol.3
++Indiv. or group behav.3 ++Oral communication3
12-13 BIOL 4320, Molec. Biology3
16

A minimum of 40 hours of chemistry is required.

*Adequate training in algebra, trigonometry, and analytical geometry is a prerequisite for calculus. The student in doubt as to which mathematics courses to take in the first year must consult with the departmental undergraduate advisor.

**Select from Health and Physical Fitness section of the Arts and Sciences General Degree Requirements.

Two courses to be chosen from ENGL 2301, 2302, 2305, 2306, and 2307. May be applied towards General Education Requirement for Humanities.

+Course chosen from CHEM 4000 (3 hrs.), MBIO 4402, BIOL 3320, and ZOOL 3405.

++General Education Requirement.

Biochemistry Curriculum, B.A. Degree. This curriculum is primarily designed to prepare an undergraduate student for entry into medical school (admission requirements for Texas medical schools are satisfied) or other medically related professional schools or for industrial employment in areas where a B.A. degree could be an asset, such as in sales or management. The degree program also provides sufficient background in biochemistry and chemistry for a graduate to enter a graduate program in biochemistry.

CHEM 1307, 1308 (or 1301, 1307, 1308), 1107, 1108, 2401,

3305, 3306, 3105, 3106, 3311, 3312, 3313, 4311,

4412 --36 hours

BIOL 1403, 1404, 3301, 3320 --14 hours

MATH 1350 (if needed), 1351, 1352 --6 hours

PHYS 1306, 1307 (or 1308, 2301) and 1103, 1104 (or 1105, 1106) --8 hours

English --12 hours

American history --6 hours

POLS 1301, 2302 --6 hours

Social or behavioral sciences --6 hours

Humanities --6 hours

Oral communication --3 hours

Fine arts --6 hours

Foreign language --6-16 hours

Health and Physical Fitness --2 hours

Minor requirements and free electives to total a minimum of 130 hours

Residency Requirements. The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry generally accepts transfer credits from other colleges and universities. However, to receive an undergraduate degree in either chemistry or biochemistry at least 25 percent of the hours in the major must be taken at Texas Tech. For a minor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, at least one of the courses past the freshman level must be taken at Texas Tech.

Advanced Standing. The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry will permit a student to receive credit for any courses in the curriculum if proficiency is demonstrated in that area by examination. Examinations for CHEM 1305, 1306, 1307, and 1308 are given the week before classes begin each semester. See the Coordinator of General Chemistry to schedule a time. Previous registration for these examinations is not required of students entering Texas Tech for the first time. Students who are enrolled must apply to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences for approval to take the examination. For all other courses, after having received approval from the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, it will be the responsibility of the student to petition the department chairperson for such examination(s) well before normal enrollment in the course.

Teacher Education. After September 1, 1991, a person applying for a teaching certificate with chemistry as the teaching field must have received a bachelor's degree with a major in chemistry. There is also an interdisciplinary degree for a person seeking certification for broad field science. See the appropriate area of this catalog for the teacher certification requirements.

There are two options available to students of the Teacher Certification Program: Option 1 and Option 2. The courses that must be taken for each option are as follows:

OPTION 1: CHEM 1307; 1308; 3201; 3305; 3105; 3306; 3106; 3307; 3107; 3308; 3108; 2401; or 2501 plus 6 to 8 hours upper division electives; plus 12 hours in a supporting field from an approved teaching field. A minimum of 36 hours in chemistry are required.

OPTION 2: CHEM 1307; 1308; 2401 or 2501; 3303; 3103; 3307 and 3107; or 3402 or 3311 or 3312; 3308 and 3108 or 2301.

Students must choose enough courses to have a minimum of 24 hours.

Students of either option should also check with the College of Education for further requirements for the certificate in Education. Depending on your emphasis, the requirements may differ.

Courses in Chemistry. (CHEM)

1105. Experimental General Chemistry I (Laboratory) (1:0:3). At the time of registration the student must be registered (or have credit) for CHEM 1305. This course is designed to introduce the student to a variety of laboratory techniques and to complement the lecture course CHEM 1305. [CHEM 1105]

1106. Experimental General Chemistry II (Laboratory) (1:0:3). Prerequisite: CHEM 1105 and CHEM 1305. At the time of registration the student must be registered (or have credit) for CHEM 1306. CHEM 1106 is a continuation of CHEM 1105. [CHEM 1107]

1107. Principles of Chemistry I (Laboratory) (1:0:3). Prerequisite: CHEM 1307 or concurrent enrollment. Introduction to a wide variety of experimental techniques. [CHEM 1111]

1108. Principles of Chemistry II (Laboratory) (1:0:3). Prerequisite: CHEM 1107 and 1307; concurrent enrollment or credit in CHEM 1308. A continuation of CHEM 1107 which serves as a prerequisite for all advanced laboratory courses in chemistry. [CHEM 1112]

1301. Introductory Chemistry (3:3:0). Basic vocabulary, concepts, and problem-solving skills required for CHEM 1307 and 1308. This course has no laboratory and will not satisfy a laboratory science requirement. [CHEM 1207]

1303. Science, Technology, and Chemistry (3:3:0). The threads of science are traced from seeds of beginnings to modern life. Emphasizes more healthful life and time-saving conveniences created by science. No lab. Satisfies technology and applied science requirement.

1305. Chemistry and Society I (3:3:0). A nonmathematical survey of basic chemical concepts, properties, and applications within society. Along with CHEM 1306, 1105, and 1106, it satisfies the laboratory science requirement for nonmajors and those who do not require CHEM 1307 and 1308. [CHEM 1305]

1306. Chemistry and Society II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 1305. This course consists of chemical applications within society and the modern chemical world. [CHEM 1307]

1307. Principles of Chemistry I (3:3:0). Prerequisite: High school chemistry or CHEM 1301 and a facility with elementary algebra (a minimum 450 Math. SAT, or its equivalent, is strongly recommended). The fundamental principles of chemistry for students who plan careers in the physical, biological, or medical sciences or engineering. [CHEM 1311]

1308. Principles of Chemistry II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 1307. A continuation of CHEM 1307 that will serve as a prerequisite for most of the more advanced chemistry courses. [CHEM 1312]

2301. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, 1107, 1308, and 1108. A descriptive survey of modern topics in inorganic chemistry, including coordination compounds, acid-base chemistry, periodicity, transition elements, and inorganic rings, cages, and chains.

2401. Analytical Chemical Methods (4:3:3). Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, 1107, 1308, 1108. A general course in analytical chemical methods emphasizing practical applications including techniques important to the biological and medical sciences.

2501. Analytical Chemistry (5:3:6). Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, 1308, and 1107, 1108. Basic course in the theories and techniques of analytical chemical methods. Required of all chemistry and biochemistry majors pursuing an American Chemical Society certified professional degree plan. [CHEM 2401]

3000. Undergraduate Research (V1-6). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Individual research project under the guidance of a member of the staff. May be repeated for credit.

3103. Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1:0:3). Prerequisite: CHEM 1105, 1106, or 1107, 1108 and concurrent enrollment in or credit for CHEM 3303. Introductory organic laboratory techniques for students in agriculture, home economics, etc.

3105, 3106. Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1:0:3 each). Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, 1308, and 1107, 1108; parallel registration in CHEM 3305, 3306 required. CHEM 3105 is prerequisite to CHEM 3106. Fundamental techniques of organic chemistry. [CHEM 2123, 2125]

3107. Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (1:0:3). Prerequisite: Credit for or concurrent registration in CHEM 3307. An introduction
to physical chemical experimental methods including calorimetry, phase equilibria, surface phenomena, and viscosity.

3108. Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (1:0:3). Prerequisite: CHEM 3307 and credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 3308. CHEM 3107 and 3108 may be taken concurrently. An introduction to physical chemical methods including spectroscopy, high-vacuum techniques, electric and magnetic phenomena.

3201. Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2:0:6). Prerequisite: CHEM 3305, 3306, 3105, and 3106. Advanced synthesis, purification, and analysis of organic compounds. Required for B.S. majors in chemistry.

3303. Introductory Organic Chemistry (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 1305, 1306, 1307, or 1308. A brief study of the chemistry of carbon compounds for students in agriculture, home economics, etc. Not for majors or minors. [CHEM 1419]

3305, 3306. Organic Chemistry (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, 1308, and 1107, 1108; parallel registration in CHEM 3105, 3106 required. CHEM 3305 is prerequisite to CHEM 3306. A thorough foundation course in organic chemistry. Prerequisite for all courses in organic chemistry above the junior level. CHEM 3305 satisfies the General Education Requirement for technology and applied science. [CHEM 2323, 2325]

3307. Physical Chemistry I (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, 1308, 1107, 1108; PHYS 1306, 1103, 1307, 1104 or 1308, 1105, 2301, 1106; MATH 1351, 1352, or equivalent. The study of gases, thermodynamics, chemical and phase equilibria, and solutions.

3308. Physical Chemistry II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 3307. The study of kinetic theory, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, transport properties, surface chemistry, quantum chemistry, and statistical mechanics.

3311. Biological Chemistry I (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 3305, 3306 and 3105, 3106; BIOL 1401, 1402 or 1403, 1404. First semester of a two-semester course in general biochemistry.

3312. Biological Chemistry II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 3311. Second semester of a two-semester course in general biochemistry.

3313. Biological Chemistry Laboratory (3:1:6). Prerequisite: CHEM 3311 or 4303. Techniques for the isolation, purification, and characterization of biomolecular species. (Writing Intensive)

3402. Physiological Chemistry (4:3:3). Prerequisite: CHEM 3103, 3303. An elementary course in physiological chemistry. Not open to majors in chemistry or chemical engineering for credit.

4000. Senior Research (V1-6). Prerequisite: Senior standing, 2.50 GPA in previous chemistry courses and consent of instructor. Individual research project under the guidance of a member of the staff. The project will be at a more advanced level than is involved in CHEM 3000. The student is required to make use of the chemical literature in the planning of the research and to submit a formal report at the end of 3 credit hours. May be repeated for credit. (Writing Intensive)

4105. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (1:0:3). Prerequisite: CHEM 2301. Techniques used in synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds: complex ion synthesis, vacuum-line techniques, chromatography, inert atmosphere preparations, spectroscopy of inorganic compounds.

4300. Individual Studies in Chemistry (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A structured independent studies course under the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit.

4302. Structure and Mechanisms in Organic Chemistry (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 3305, 3306, and 3105, 3106 and 3307. Organic chemistry at an advanced level. Emphasis on developments in theoretical organic chemistry.

4303. Molecular Biochemistry (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 3305, 3306, 3105, 3106. Molecular descriptions of biological materials and systems. A one-semester course covering molecular approaches to biochemistry and metabolism.

4309. Inorganic Chemistry II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 2301 and 3307. A theoretical coverage of modern aspects of inorganic chemistry, including symmetry, group theory, spectroscopy, inorganic reaction mechanisms, transition metal, and organometallic chemistry. (Writing Intensive)

4310. Polymer Chemistry (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 4311 or 3307, and 3306. An introduction to the chemistry of macromolecules, including the synthesis, structures, properties, and applications of polymers.

4311. Physical Chemistry for the Biological Sciences (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, 1308, 1107, 1108, 3311, PHYS 1308, 2301, 1105, 1106 or 1306, 1307, 1103, 1104, MATH 1351, 1352. A general physical chemistry course for majors in biochemistry and the biological sciences. Topics include quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

4312. Physical Biochemistry (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CHEM 1107, 1108, 1307, 1308, 3305, 3306, 3105, 3106, 3311, 3312, 3313, and 4311 or 3307; MATH 1351, 1352, PHY 1308, 2301, 1105, 1106. Applications of physical chemical techniques to proteins, nucleic acids, and membranes.

4412. Instrumental Analytical Methods (4:3:3). Prerequisite: CHEM 2401 or 2501 and 3307, 3107 or 4311. Theories and application of instrumental methods of chemical analysis. (Writing Intensive)


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