General Information

Mission

The mission of Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center is to provide the highest standard of excellence in higher education, while pursuing continuous quality improvement; to stimulate the greatest degree of meaningful research; and to support faculty and staff in satisfying those whom we serve.

History

Created by legislative action on February 10, 1923, Texas Technological College opened in the fall of 1925 in Lubbock. There were six buildings and the enrollment was 910.

Graduate instruction began in the fall of 1927, and the Graduate School was established in 1954. The School of Law began instruction in 1967.

The name was formally changed to Texas Tech University in 1969. At that time, Agricultural Sciences, Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Education, Engineering, and Home Economics became "colleges." In 1986, the College of Architecture was established. The School of Mass Communications and the School of Music were established within the College of Arts and Sciences in 1988. Two colleges changed their names in 1993 to reflect the broadening fields each serves: the College of Agricultural Sciences became the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources and the College of Home Economics became the College of Human Sciences. The Honors College was established in 1998.

Organization

Texas Tech University consists of eight colleges and two schools: the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, the College of Architecture, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business Administration, the College of Education, the College of Engineering, the Honors College, the College of Human Sciences, the School of Law, and the Graduate School. Functioning within the College of Arts and Sciences are the School of Mass Communications and the School of Music. Each college is administered by a dean and his or her staff, and most consist of a number of instructional departments, divisions, or areas.

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center was created by the 61st Legislature of the State of Texas in 1969 as a separate educational institution to address problems of health care delivery in rural areas and to develop education programs emphasizing primary care throughout West Texas.

The School of Medicinethe initial operational phase of the Health Sciences Centeradmitted its first students in 1972. In 1981, the state legislature funded schools of Nursing and Allied Health. Nursing students were first admitted in August 1982 with Allied Health students admitted in 1983. In the fall of 1996, the School of Pharmacy admitted its first class. A School of Veterinary Medicine has been approved and awaits funding.

Board of Regents

Texas Tech University is governed by a Board of Regents whose nine members are appointed to six-year terms by the Governor of the State of Texas with the advice and consent of the Senate. The terms of office of three Regents expire on January 31 of odd-numbered years. The Board is empowered by the Legislature to direct, control, and manage the policies of Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center ("Texas Tech").

The Office of the Board of Regents serves as the on-site secretariat for the Board of Regents and coordinates faculty, staff, and student contact with the Regents.

Principal Administrative Officers

(Date following rank indicates year of initial appointment to Texas Tech.)

Office of the Chancellor

CHANCELLOR JOHN T. MONTFORD, Professor of Law, 1996.
B.A., Texas (Austin), 1965; J.D., 1968.

DEPUTY CHANCELLOR JAMES L. CROWSON, 1996.
B.A., Oklahoma, 1960; LL.B., Southern Methodist, 1963.

VICE CHANCELLOR FOR CULTURAL DIVERSITY CATHY ALLEN, 1997.
B.B.A., Stephen F. Austin State, 1981; M.Ed., 1989.

VICE CHANCELLOR AND GENERAL COUNSEL PAT CAMPBELL, 1981.
B.S., Texas Tech, 1968; J.D., 1971.

VICE CHANCELLOR FOR INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT RONDA J. JOHNSON, 1997.
B.S., Texas (Austin), 1966; M.B.A., Houston Baptist, 1980.

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR BEN LOCK, 1996.
B.B.A., Texas (Austin), 1981; M.B.A., 1984.

VICE CHANCELLOR FOR FACILITIES, PLANNING, AND CONSTRUCTION DOUGLAS MANN, 1997.
B.L.A., Kansas State, 1985.

VICE CHANCELLOR FOR ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE JOHN OPPERMAN, 1996.
B.A., Texas Tech, 1977; M.P.A., Texas (Austin), 1982; Ph.D., 1994.

VICE CHANCELLOR FOR GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS MIKE SANDERS, 1971.
B.A., Abilene Christian, 1966; J.D., Texas Tech, 1970.

VICE CHANCELLOR FOR SPECIAL PROJECTS WILLIAM G. WEHNER, 1990.
B.A., Oklahoma State, 1963.

Office of the President

PRESIDENT DONALD R. HARAGAN, Professor of Atmospheric Science and Geosciences, 1969.
B.S., Texas, 1959; M.S., Texas A&M, 1960; Ph.D., Texas, 1969.

PROVOST JOHN M. BURNS, Professor of Biological Sciences, 1969.
B.S., New Mexico State, 1963; M.S., 1966; Ph.D., Indiana, 1969.

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT MICHAEL R. HEINTZE, 1998.
B.A., Texas Lutheran; 1972; M.A., Southwest Texas State, 1974; Ph.D., Texas Tech, 1981.

VICE PRESIDENT FOR FISCAL AFFAIRS JIM C. BRUNJES, 1991.
B.A., Texas A&M, 1969; M.Stat., 1972.

ACTING VICE PRESIDENT FOR OPERATIONS HIRUM E. (GENE) WEST, 1982.
B.S., Texas Tech, 1962; M.S., 1968.

VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS ROBERT H. EWALT, Associate Professor of Education, 1973.
B.S., Oregon State, 1956; M.A., Illinois, 1961; Ph.D., 1967.

VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AND GRADUATE STUDIES AND DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL DAVID J. SCHMIDLY, Professor of Biological Sciences, 1996.
B.S., Texas Tech, 1966; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., Illinois (Champaign-Urbana), 1971.


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LAST UPDATE: 8-1-98