Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures

Professor P. G. Christiansen, Chairperson.

Horn Professors Janet Pérez; Qualia Professor Gafaiti; Professors Andrews, Finco, George, Goebel, Larmour, Genaro Pérez, and Smith; Associate Professors Bravo, Cravens, Holland, McClain, McVay, Nell, Julián Pérez, Stein, Stratton, and Wood; Assistant Professors Beard, Cabrera, Chávez, Collopy, Corbett, Dragacci-Paulsen, Fry, Grair, Hopkins, Klock, Myers, Qualin, and Saunders.

This department supervises the following degree programs: Bachelor of Arts in FRENCH, GERMAN, LATIN, and SPANISH, Master of Arts in APPLIED LINGUISTICS, CLASSICAL HUMANITIES, GERMAN, and ROMANCE LANGUAGES, and Doctor of Philosophy in SPANISH. The department participates in the RUSSIAN LANGUAGE AND AREA STUDIES program at the undergraduate level and the LATIN AMERICAN AND IBERIAN STUDIES program at the undergraduate level as well as in the minor at the master's and doctoral level. The department also participates in the ethnic studies, honors, linguistics, comparative literature, and teacher education programs. See the section on Special and Interdepartmental Programs of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Majors and Minors for the B.A. Degree. An undergraduate major in French, German, or Spanish consists of 30 hours at the 2000 level and above including a minimum of five 4000 level courses. German majors may substitute GERM 3305 and 3306 for two of the five 4000 level courses. The Latin major consists of 18 hours of classics or classical studies courses LAT 2301, 2302, and six hours of 4000 Latin. Students pursuing teacher certification must replace classics with advanced Latin to complete 24 hours in Latin per se.

A minor may be obtained in Classical Studies and in French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian, or Spanish. A minimum of 18 hours is required, although 1501 is not counted for the minor in French, German, Russian, or Spanish, including at least 3 hours at the 4000-level. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) credits are accepted by the department.

Students wishing to obtain information on a major or minor in one of these languages should consult the department chairperson for a list of advisors. These advisors can provide information on all aspects of the major and minor programs, including career opportunities. A grade of at least C in all major and minor courses is required.

Resident Courses. Students who are minors are required to take at least one upper level class (3 SCH) in residence in the target language at Texas Tech University. Students who are majors are required to take at least three upper level classes (9 SCH) in residence in the target language at Texas Tech University. Students who study abroad with the University programs (which involve faculty from our department) may include those courses among the required courses. Foreign study courses taken through approved exchange programs or other programs which may be affiliated with Texas Tech, such as the University of the Americas in Puebla (and others of a similar nature), are not considered as resident courses.

Study Abroad Courses. Students enrolled in Spanish have the opportunity to study in Mexico and earn 6 hours of junior and/or senior level credit with the annual summer Mexico Field Course program, or in Spain. Students enrolled in German may earn 6 hours credit (GERM 3305 and 3306) in Germany or Austria with the annual summer German Study Abroad Program. Students in this program may not receive credit towards a major or minor in German for any course below GERM 2302, unless completed prior to departure and must complete a 33-hour major if they participate in the program twice. Students enrolled in Russian have the option to earn credit by participating in study tours of Russia. These are regularly offered.

Foreign Language Requirements and Options. To fulfill the general Bachelor of Arts requirements, students must complete 6 semester hours in the same language at the sophomore level or above. A student who enrolls in the first-year sequence will have a 11-16 hour requirement.

The regular first and second year foreign language courses (1301, 1501, or 1507 through 2302) are sequential. Students with two years of high school French, German, or Spanish are required to enroll in FREN 1507, GERM 1507, or SPAN 1507. Those students enrolled in 1507 but judged not qualified for 1507 are required to take 1501 pass-fail. Students with two years of high school Latin are required to take the Placement Exam. Successful completion of lower-numbered courses or equivalent competency is a prerequisite for the higher-numbered courses. A student who has received credit for an upper division course (3000-4000) may not subsequently receive credit for lower division courses (1000-2000) in the same language. These higher-numbered courses allow students to pursue their particular interests in language, civilization, and literature.

Instruction is offered in Russian language and literature with independent study available in Slavic and some East European and Central Asian subjects. For information on a BA degree or a minor in Russian Language and Area Studies, see the description of the program under "Arts and Sciences Special Programs." Students who studied Russian before coming to Texas Tech should consult the advisor in Russian to determine the level at which to register for further study.

B.A. and M.B.A. This is a program of great practical value, made possible by cooperation between this department and the College of Business Administration. Undergraduate students may major in one of four languagesFrench, German, Russian Language and Area Studies, or Spanishwhile minoring in business. One more year earns an MBA and a chance to participate in the international business community. Students must qualify for graduate admission to the College of Business Administration.

International Students. No students from a French, German, Russian, or Spanish-speaking country who have graduated from a secondary school in their native land may receive credit for a language course in their native language numbered below 4000.

The following courses may not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree: GERM 4302, 4312, RUSN 2303, 3301, 3302, 4301, and 4311.

Teacher Education. For purposes of certification, teaching fields are offered in French, German, Latin, and Spanish. The standard program requires 24-27 hours at the 2000-level and above, which must include 9 hours of 4000-level courses in the specific language (12 hours in German). Students seeking secondary certification in French and Spanish must complete LING 4311, preferably before their student teaching, as part of the teaching field. Students seeking bilingual education endorsement, ESL endorsement, or secondary or elementary certification in French, German, Latin, or Spanish should consult with advisors in the College of Education and in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures.

Placement and Credit by Examination. The department offers placement tests in French, German, Latin, and Spanish. These tests permit students to earn up to 16 hours credit for a variety of first and second year courses. The placement tests also provide a recommended placement or the next logical course the student should take.

Each placement test is intended to evaluate an individual's general level of knowledge of the language; a grade is not issued, nor is any specific text or study material recommended for the tests. Any credit earned through these tests is posted to the student's transcript as credit by examination after 12 hours have been completed at Texas Tech. The hours will count towards languages or other humanities requirement, depending on the student's college, but will not affect the grade-point average.

Students who earn credit through a language placement test may not later take that course and receive credit. Likewise, an individual cannot receive credit through the placement tests for a course that has already been completed, nor may one receive first or second year credit after completing a 3000 level course or above. Each of the language placement tests [i.e., French, German, Latin, Spanish] may be taken only once per student.

The placement tests are administered by the Language Laboratory in Room 19 Foreign Languages Building. The tests are offered the last Wednesday and Thursday of each month (except December), during preregistration periods, and at the beginning of each long semester. Further information may be obtained by calling the Language Laboratory at 742-3151.

Courses in Chinese. (CHIN)

1401, 1402. A Beginning Course in Chinese I, II (4:4:1 each). Introduction and development of the four language skills in Chinese. Listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

2301, 2302. A Second Course in Chinese I, II (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: CHIN 1402 (for CHIN 2301) and 2301 (for CHIN 2302). Reading, cultural background, grammar review, conversation, and composition.

4300. Individual Problems in Chinese (3). Prerequisite: CHIN 2302 or equivalent as well as consent of instructor and department chairperson. Contents will vary to meet the needs of the student May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Independent work under the guidance of a faculty member.

Courses in Classical and Modern Languages
and Literatures. (CMLL)

1301, 1302. Individual Studies in Modern Languages I, II (3 each). Introduction and development of skills in a modern language, including listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

2301, 2302. Individual Studies in Modern Languages III, IV (3 each). Prerequisite: CMLL 1301 and 1302, or equivalent. Continuation of study of a modern language, introduction and development of skills in a modern language, including listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

4300. Individual Studies in Modern Language (3). Prerequisite: CMLL 2302 or equivalent. Independent study in modern language under the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

Courses in Classics. (CLAS)

Prerequisites for classics courses do not involve Latin or Greek and are as follows unless otherwise specified: 1310 and 1320none; all 3000-leveljunior standing or consent of instructor. Courses in classics may not be counted toward the foreign language requirement.

1310. Latin and Greek Terminology (3:3:0). Analysis of English words through the study of Latin and Greek roots, prefixes, and suffixes.

1320. Introduction to the Mythology of the Classical World (3:3:0). Classical myths: stories of gods, demigods, and heroes; their significance in the ancient and modern worlds. Selected readings in translation with lectures and discussions in English.

1330. Sports and Public Spectacles in the Ancient World (3:3:0). Introductory survey of Greek and Roman athletics, the Roman Triumph, gladiatorial combat, and other spectacles in the Ancient World.

3320. The World of Greece (3:3:0). A survey of the literature of ancient Greece from Homer to Plato, together with lectures on culture, society, philosophy, religion, art, and architecture.

3330. The World of Rome (3:3:0). A survey of ancient Roman Literature in the later republic and imperial centuries, together with lectures on Roman culture, society, religion, and architecture from 1000 B.C. E. to C.E. 476.

3350. Comparative Mythology (3:3:0). Ancient myths in various cultures and their influence on modern literature and film.

Courses in English as a Second Language. (ESL)

1301. Oral Skills for International Students (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Development of oral language skills and interaction strategies, English pronunciation and intonation, and idiomatic English expression.

1302. English Grammar and Composition for International Students (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Development of academic writing skills with emphasis on the grammar of written English.

Courses in French. (FREN)

FREN 3301 and/or 3302, or the equivalent, are prerequisites for all literature courses in the 4000 series except where specified in the individual courses. All of these courses are conducted in French.

1320. Introduction to the Culture of France (3:3:0). Will explore French literary texts and other materials such as films within their cultural contexts. Selected readings in translation with lectures and discussions in English. Credit does not apply to major or minor.

1501, 1502. A Beginning Course in French I, II (5:5:1 each). [FREN 1411, 1412]

1507. Comprehensive French ReviewFirst Year (5:5:1). Prerequisite: Two years of high school French. A comprehensive one-semester review.

2301, 2302. A Second Course in French I, II (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: FREN 1501 and 1502 or 1507. Readings, cultural background, conversation, and composition. [FREN 2311, 2312]

3301. French Life and Culture (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FREN 2301 and 2302, or equivalent. Survey of the characteristics of French culture and civilization.

3302. Major French Writers (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FREN 2301 and 2302, or equivalent. A survey of major French writers.

3303. French Conversation (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FREN 2301 and 2302, or equivalent. Designed to increase vocabulary and attain oral fluency. May be taken concurrently with FREN 3301 or 3302.

4100. Advanced Individual Problems in French (1). Prerequisite: FREN 2301 or equivalent. Contents will vary to meet the needs of student. May be repeated for credit with the consent of the instructor.

4300. Individual Problems in French (3). Prerequisite: FREN 2301 and/or 2304, together with consent of instructor and department chairperson. Contents will vary to meet the needs of students. May be repeated for credit with the consent of the instructor. Independent work under the guidance of a staff member.

4302. Advanced Grammar and Composition (3:3:0). Review of important grammatical constructions and idioms, with written practice.

4303. Advanced French Conversation (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FREN 3303. Designed to increase fluency in the spoken language.

4304. Commercial French (3:3:0). Oral and written French, with special attention to idiomatic expressions currently in use in business and technical fields.

4306. Phonetics and Diction (3:3:0). Theory and practice of the principles of pronunciation and intonations. Individual laboratory exercises.

4310. A Survey of French Literature I (3:3:0). A survey of the major French literary works from the Song of Roland to 1800.

4315. The French Short Story (3:3:0). This course will trace the development of the French short story from Voltaire's Candide to Boris Vian's Les Lurettes Furreés.

4317. Readings in French Literature and Culture (3:3:0). Prerequisite: FREN 3301, 3302, 3303, or equivalent. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Conducted in French.

4322. Civilisation Francaise: French Civilization (3:3:0). A survey of French civilization from the Middle Ages to the present: literature, art, music, philosophy, science, and architecture. Readings, slides, films, and tapes. Conducted in French.

Courses in German. (GERM)

1501, 1502. A Beginning Course in German I, II (5:5:1 each). Oral practice, elementary reading, and grammar. [GERM 1411, 1412]

1507. Comprehensive German Review-First Year (5:5:1). Prerequisite: Two years of high school German. A comprehensive one-semester review.

2301, 2302. A Second Course in German I, II (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: GERM 1501 and 1502 or 1507. Reading, cultural background, grammar review, and conversation. [GERM 2311, 2312]

3301. German Culture and Society (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GERM 2301 and 2302 or equivalent. Short stories, poetry, and reading on culture and current issues. Conducted in German.

3303. Conversation and Composition (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GERM 2302 or equivalent. Emphasis on fluency in spoken and written German. May be taken concurrently with GERM 3301. Conducted in German.

3304. Introduction to Literature (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GERM 2301, 2302 or equivalent. An introduction to periodization of German literature, literary genres, and literary theory.

3305. German Language Studies (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GERM 1502 and consent of director. Development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Austria or Germany. Offered each summer. May be repeated once for credit.

3306. Contemporary Germany (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GERM 1502 and consent of director. Readings in cultural history and literature, lectures and tours on location. Taught in German. May not be repeated for credit toward major or minor.

4000. Individual and Group Studies in German (V1-6). Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson. Study in German under the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit.

4301. Grammar (3:3:0). Prerequisite: GERM 3301 and 3303 or equivalent. Review of grammatical structure. Practice in pronunciation and in written and spoken German. May be taken concurrently with GERM 3304.

4303. German Classics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: 6 hours from GERM 3301, 3303, 3304, or equivalent. Readings in German literature through selected works by Hoffman, Büchner, Keller, Kleist, Storm, and Hauptmann. Conducted in German.

4304. Modern Masterpieces (3:3:0). Prerequisite: 6 hours from GERM 3301, 3303, 3304, or equivalent. Readings in German literature through selected works by Mann, Kafka, Hesse, Zweig, Boell, and Grass. Conducted in German.

4305. Readings in German Language and Literature (3:3:0). Prerequisite: 6 hours from GERM 3301, 3303, 3304, or equivalent. Readings from a particular period or study of a literary theme. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Conducted in German.

4312. Literature of the Holocaust (3:3:0). Examination of the Holocaust as represented in literature, film, and art. Conducted in English.

Courses in Greek. (GRK)

1301, 1302. A Beginning Course in Greek I, II (3:3:0 each). [GREE 1311, 1312]

2301, 2302. A Second Course in Greek I, II (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: GRK 1301 and 1302, or equivalent. Review; selected readings from standard authors. [GREE 2311, 2312]

4300. Individual Problems in Greek (3). Prerequisite: GRK 2301 and 2302 or equivalent. Contents will vary to meet the needs of students. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Independent readings under guidance of a staff member.

Courses in Italian. (ITAL)

1301, 1302. A Beginning Course in Italian I, II (3:3:0 each). [ITAL 1311, 1312]

2301, 2302. A Second Course in Italian I, II (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: ITAL 1301 and 1302, or equivalent. Reading, cultural background, conversation, and composition. [ITAL 2311, 2312]

4300. Individual Problems in Italian (3). Prerequisite: ITAL 2301 and 2302, or equivalent. Contents will vary to meet the needs of students. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Independent work under guidance of a staff member.

Courses in Japanese. (JAPN)

1501, 1502. A Beginning Course in Japanese I, II (5:5:1 each). Introduction and development of the four language skills: listening comprehension, speaking, writing, and reading. [JAPN 1411, 1412]

2301, 2302. A Second Course in Japanese I, II (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: JAPN 1501 and 1502. Reading, cultural background, grammar review, conversation, and composition. [JAPN 2311, 2312]

4300. Individual Studies in Japanese (3). Prerequisite: JAPN 2302 or equivalent. Independent study in the Japanese language under the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

Courses in Latin. (LAT)

1501, 1502. A Beginning Course in Latin I, II (5:5:0 each). [LATI 1411, 1412]

1507. Comprehensive Latin ReviewFirst Year (5:5:0). Prerequisite: Equivalent of two years high school Latin, placement exam, or departmental consent. A comprehensive one-semester review of first year Latin for qualified students.

2301, 2302. A Second Course in Latin I, II (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: LAT 1501 and 1502 or 1507. Review; selected readings from standard authors. [LATI 2311, 2312]

4300. Individual Problems in Latin (3). Contents will vary to meet the needs of the students. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Independent reading under guidance of a staff member.

4302. Advanced Composition and Grammar Review (3). Practice in Latin prose composition.

4305. Individualized Readings in Latin Literature (3). Contents will vary to meet the needs of students. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Major works of selected Latin writers.

Courses in Linguistics. (LING)

4311. Applied Linguistics for Foreign Languages (3:3:0). Prerequisite: 6 hours of junior level French or Spanish. The relation of applied linguistics to foreign language study.

4335. Linguistic Analysis for Bilingual Education-ESL (3:3:0). Linguistic analysis (applied, descriptive, and/or contrastive) as it relates to bilingual education or English as a second language.

Courses in Portuguese. (PORT)

4300. Individual Problems in Portuguese (3). Prerequisite: PORT 2301 and 2302, or equivalent. Contents will vary to meet the needs of students. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Independent work under guidance of a staff member.

Courses in Russian. (RUSN)

1501, 1502. A Beginning Course in Russian I, II (5:5:1 each). Introduction and development of the four language skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. [RUSS 1411, 1412]

2201. Second Year Conversation I (2:2:0). Prerequisite: RUSN 1502. Designed to accompany RUSN 2301 (Second Year Russian). The course is intended to develop the students' conversational skills.

2202. Second Year Conversation II (2:2:0). Prerequisite: RUSN 2301. Designed to accompany RUSN 2302 (Second Year Russian). The course is intended to develop the students' conversational skills.

2301, 2302. A Second Course in Russian I, II (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: RUSN 1501, 1502, or equivalent. Training in oral and written expression and in aural and reading comprehension, including optional work in the language laboratory. [RUSS 2311, 2312]

2303. An Introduction to Russian Culture (3:3:0). The course is an introduction to Russian culture. We will look at important historical, political, and cultural (i.e., literature, music, and art) events and trends that have been instrumental in forming Russian culture. Taught in English.

3301. Russian Civilization through Literature in the Nineteenth Century (3:3:0). A survey course of 19th century Russian literature. We will read the works of the century's most important writers from Alexander Pushkin to Anton Checkov. Taught in English.

3302. Twentieth Century Russian Civilization Through Literature in Translation (3:3:0). This course will deal with the literature and other arts of the turn of the 20th Century in Russia and with the survival of this pre-1917 cultural tradition among the émigrés and in the Soviet Union. Taught in English.

3303. Russian Conversation and Composition (3:3:0). Prerequisite: RUSN 2302 or consent of instructor. The course is designed to increase fluency in the spoken language and proficiency in composition. Taught in Russian. May be repeated for credit.

4301. The Great Russian Realists: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3:3:0). Examines the significance of Tolstoy's and Dostoevsky's masterpieces. The works will be read in translation. Conducted in English.

4302. Contemporary Russian Literature in Translation (3:3:0). This course will examine the works of major Russian authors such as Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Tatyana Tolstaya from 1953 to the present.

4310. Russian Language Study in Russia (3:3:0). Intensive study of the Russian language and culture. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

4311. The Land, Peoples, and Cultures of the Former Soviet Union (3:3:0). Treats the various nationalities of the former USSR. The focus is on the linguistic, cultural, and historical characteristics of these nationalities, how they have interacted with Russia, and their contemporary condition. Taught in English.

Courses in Slavic. (SLAV)

4300. Individual Studies in Slavistics (3). Independent study in Slavic and East European subjects under guidance of a faculty member, with content varying according to needs. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

Courses in Spanish. (SPAN)

Two of the following courses: SPAN 3301, 3302, and 3303, or the equivalent, are prerequisites for all courses in the 4000 series. All courses in the 4000 series except 4302, 4303, 4304, and 4307 may be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

1501, 1502. A Beginning Course in Spanish I, II (5:5:1 each). [SPAN 1411, 1412]

1507. Comprehensive Spanish Review-First Year (5:5:1). Prerequisite: Two years high school Spanish. A comprehensive one-semester review.

2301, 2302. A Second Course in Spanish I, II (3:3:1 each). Prerequisite: SPAN 1501 and 1502 or 1507. Reading, cultural background, conversation, and composition. (Honors section offered.) [SPAN 2311, 2312]

2303, 2304. Intermediate Spanish for Hispanic Students I, II (3:3:0 each). Prerequisite: placement exam. A second year course designed for Hispanic students educated in the United States who have had exposure to Spanish at home and limited formal training in Spanish.

2607. Intensive SpanishSecond Year (6:6:1). Prerequisite: SPAN 1501 and 1502 or 1507. Reading, culture, conversation, and composition. Equivalent to 2301 and 2302.

3301. Hispanic Life and Culture (3:3:0). Prerequisite: SPAN 2301 and 2302 or equivalent. Origins, development, and characteristics of Hispanic life and culture. Conducted in Spanish.

3302. Introduction to Spanish Literatures (3:3:0). Prerequisite: SPAN 2301 and 2302 or equivalent. Introductory study of representative worksshort stories, poems, play, etc.of Spanish and Spanish American literatures.

3303. Spanish Conversation (3:3:0). Prerequisite: SPAN 2301 and 2302 or equivalent. Designed to increase proficiency in the spoken Spanish of students who have had little or no extra-academic experience in that language. (Includes work in grammar and composition.) May not be taken following 4000-level work.

3304. Intermediate Spanish Grammar (3:3:0). Prerequisite: SPAN 2302 and 2302 or equivalent. An overview of important Spanish grammar concepts.

3328. Spanish Language Development (3:3:0). Prerequisite: SPAN 2301 and 2302 or equivalent and consent of instructor. Development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills on location in Mexico. Offered in Mexico each summer.

3329. Mexican Life and Culture (3:3:0). Prerequisite: SPAN 2301 and 2302 or equivalent, and consent of instructor. A basic survey of Mexico, with emphasis on its history and cultural patterns. Offered in Mexico each summer.

3390. Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3:3:0). An overview of the Hispanic world, from Roman Spain to modern Latin America. Taught in English. Not for Spanish majors or minors but recommended as supplementary. Carries Humanities credits.

4100. Advanced Individual Problems in Spanish (1). Prerequisite: SPAN 2302 or equivalent, together with consent of instructor and department chairperson. Contents will vary to meet the needs of students. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Specifically designed for individual projects calling for fewer than 3 semester credit hours.

4300. Individual Problems in Spanish (3). Prerequisite: SPAN 2302 or equivalent, together with consent of instructor and department chairperson. Contents will vary to meet the needs of the students. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Independent work under the guidance of a staff member.

4302. Advanced Grammar (3:3:0). Spanish language, syntax, and grammar.

4303. Advanced Conversation (3:3:0). Development of conversational skills for students who have completed required work in grammar or composition. No student who has graduated from a secondary school (junior high or high school level) in a Spanish-speaking country may receive credit for this course.

4304. Commercial Spanish (3:3:0). Oral and written Spanish with special attention to accurate and idiomatic expressions currently in use in the business and technical fields.

4307. Advanced Composition (3:3:0). Principles of correct writing and stylistics.

4310. Masterpieces of Spanish Literature (3:3:0). An introduction to Spanish literature through selected works and authors.

4312. Spanish Prose (3:3:0). Readings of selected prose works in Spanish literature. Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.

4314. Spanish Drama and Poetry (3:3:0). Study of selected dramas and/or poetry in Spanish literature. Contents will vary to meet the needs of students. May be repeated for credit.

4317. Readings in Spanish Literature (3:3:0). Readings of selected authors and works in Spanish literature. Content will vary to meet the needs of students.

4320. Masterpieces of Spanish American Literature (3:3:0). An introduction to Spanish American literature through selected works and authors.

4321. Spanish American Prose (3:3:0). Readings of selected prose works of Spanish American literature.

4324. Spanish American Drama and Poetry (3:3:0). Study of selected dramas and/or poetry in Spanish American literature. May be repeated for credit.

4325. The Hispanic Short Story (3:3:0). Study of short stories from Spain and/or Spanish America.

4327. Readings in Spanish American Literature and Civilization (3:3:0). The content of this course will vary to meet the needs of the students.

4328. Advanced Language Skills (3:3:0). This course is intended to develop advanced language skills by class work and organized field projects. Special emphasis is given to the development of oral skills. Offered only in Mexico each summer.

4329. Contemporary Mexico (3:3:0). A study of the various facets of contemporary Mexico: history, arts, politics, and economics. Offered only in Mexico each summer.

4330. Spanish Life and Culture (3:3:0). Prerequisite: SPAN 3303 or equivalent. A survey of Spain with emphasis on its literature, history, and culture. Offered in Spain each summer.

4332. Civilización Hispánica: Hispanic Civilization (3:3:0). A thematic study of Spanish and Spanish American patterns of civilization, especially in the contemporary period, and the United States' Spanish heritage.

4360. Hispanic Literature of the Southwest (3:3:0). The origin and development of Hispanic literature in the Southwest including Spanish literature (1539-1820), Mexican literature (1821-1848), and Mexican-American literature (1849-present).

4390. Internship in Spanish (3). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Work experience in a community agency that deals with native Spanish speakers. Emphasis on communicative skills.

4391. Spanish for the Southwest (3:3:0). Study of similarities and differences between "standard" and "regional" Spanish.

Courses in Vietnamese. (VIET)

4300. Individual Problems in Vietnamese (3). Content varies to meet the needs of students. May be repeated for credit.


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