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CONTACT INFORMATION: 212 English/Philosophy Building
Box 43091, Lubbock, TX 79409-3091
T 806.742.2501, F 806.742.0989, www.english.ttu.edu

 

About the Program

This department supervises the following degree programs and certificates:

        • Bachelor of Arts in English
        • Bachelor of Arts in Technical Communication
        • Master of Arts in English
        • Master of Arts in Technical Communication
        • Doctor of Philosophy in English
        • Doctor of Philosophy in Technical Communication and Rhetoric
        • Graduate Certificate in Linguistics
        • Graduate Certificate in Publishing and Editing
        • Graduate Certificate in Teaching Technical Communication


In addition to its degree and certificate programs, the Department of English cooperates in interdepartmental programs in linguistics and comparative literature at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The department also sponsors both the local chapter of Sigma Tau Delta (the national English honorary society) and a chapter of the Society for Technical Communication and supports the publication of six journals: 32 Poems, Conradiana, The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, The Iron Horse Literary Review, Technical Communication Quarterly, and William Carlos Williams Review.Back to Top


Undergraduate Program

Bachelor of Arts in English

The program in English requires 120 semester credit hours, including the core curriculum, the major, and a minor. English majors must specialize in literature and language, creative writing, or the certificate program for teaching in the secondary schools. A maximum of 9 advanced hours of transfer credit in English will be accepted for the major.

Literature and Language Concentration. Students majoring in English with a concentration in literature and language study literary works from a wide variety of periods and genres. They learn to think critically and analytically about literature and about language itself. This concentration prepares students for many careers—including teaching, government service, and business—and for graduate and professional study in fields requiring extensive reading and writing, such as law, medicine, and business. ENGL 1301, 1302, 2391 and 3 hours from ENGL 2305, 2306, 2307, 2308, 2371, and 2388 are required for an English major with a concentration in literature and language. Majors must complete 15 hours at the 3000-level and 12 hours at the 4000-level in the following courses:

  1. 3000-level courses
    1. Period Courses

      Take three of the following: ENGL 3302, 3304, 3305, 3307, 3308, 3309, 3323, 3324, 3325, 3335, 3336, 3337.

      • One course must be Early: ENGL 3302, 3304, 3305, 3323, 3335
      • One must be American: ENGL 3323, 3324, 3325
      • One must be British: ENGL 3302, 3304, 3305, 3307, 3308, 3309

      Note that some courses fulfill more than one category (e.g., ENGL 3302 is both Early and British; ENGL 3323 is both Early and American). However, three courses are required from this group.

    2. Two additional 3000-level courses.
  2. 4000-level courses
    1. ENGL 4374
    2. Three additional 4000-level courses from the following: ENGL 4300, 4301, 4311, 4312, 4313, 4314, 4315, 4321, 4342, 4351, 4371, or 4373

Creative Writing Concentration. The major in English with a concentration in creative writing is designed for students wishing to write fiction, nonfiction, and/or poetry with the guidance of teachers who write. This plan allows maximum concentration in literature courses so that, as they write, students may further understand and appreciate the aspects and techniques of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. In addition to the opportunities for writing and literary study, this concentration is especially appropriate for students interested in teaching creative writing and literature at the college level, studying creative writing and literature in graduate school, and preparing for professional graduate schools, such as law and business. Permission to take 4351 requires submission of a writing sample, the prerequisite of ENGL 3351 in the same genre, and permission of the instructor.

The creative writing specialization requires ENGL 1301 and 1302 and 6 hours of 2000-level courses: 3 hours from ENGL 2305, 2306, 2307, 2308, 2371, or 2388; and 3 hours from ENGL 2351 or 2391.

Advanced courses include 15 hours at the 3000 level and 12 hours at the 4000 level.

  1. 3000-level courses
    1. One early literature period course: ENGL 3302, 3304, 3305, or 3335
    2. One British literature period course: ENGL 3302, 3304, 3305, 3307, 3308, or 3309
    3. One American literature period course: ENGL 3323, 3324, or 3325
    4. Six hours of ENGL 3351 under two separate genres (fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction)
  2. 4000-level courses
    1. ENGL 4351
    2. Three additional 4000-level courses from the following: ENGL 4300, 4301, 4311, 4312, 4313, 4314, 4315, 4321, 4342, 4351, 4371, 4373, or 4374

Certification for Teaching. Students seeking a provisional certificate with English Language Arts as a teaching field may satisfy the requirement in English through the Bachelor of Arts degree. Certification requirements are determined by the State Board for Education Certification and are subject to change. A grade of C or better in all English courses is required. In addition, the certification program requires a 2.5 GPA in the teaching field. Before beginning to take advanced courses, students should successfully complete ENGL 1301 and 1302 and two courses in 2000-level English (2305, 2306, 2307, 2308, 2311, 2351, 2371, 2388, or 2391). Students planning to become high school teachers should minor in secondary education, which includes student teaching (EDSE 4000). They will be required to take EDSE 4000 for their student teaching experience. The university has implemented a new teacher education program that includes a full year of student teaching (two semesters of the senior year). Students wishing to obtain teacher certification should consult with the department’s undergraduate advisor and see a College of Education advisor to complete a certification plan.

Bachelor of Arts in Technical Communication

The Bachelor of Arts in Technical Communication will provide a broad liberal arts background and intensive training in the principles and practices of technical communication. It will prepare students for careers as technical communicators, editors, grant writers, website developers, information architects, and publications managers in a variety of professional domains, including publishing, education, government, health care, biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering. It also will prepare students for graduate education in technical communication as well as in law, business, science, and medicine.

The technical communication program requires 120 semester credit hours consisting of the core curriculum, 30 hours in a major field, and a required minor.

Requirements:

  1. 2000-level Course: ENGL 2311
  2. 3000-level courses
    1. One of the following: 3366, 3371, 3373
    2. Four of the following: 3360, 3362, 3365, 3366, 3367, 3368, 3369 (Note: 3366 may be used only once)
  3. 4000-level courses
    1. Three of the following: 4360, 4365, 4366, 4367, 4368, 4369, 4378
    2. ENGL 4380

Minors

Minor in English. An English minor consists of 18 hours: ENGL 1302, two 2000-level English courses, and 9 hours of advanced English courses (3000 or 4000 level). To receive credit toward graduation, a student who is an English major or minor must receive at least a C in courses in English. A maximum of 3 advanced hours of transfer credit will be accepted for the minor.
Students wishing to use an English minor to complete the core Language, Philosophy, and Culture requirement must choose two courses from ENGL 2305, 2306, 2307, 2308, 2351, 2388, and 2391 for their sophomore-level courses. At least two of their three upper-level courses must be numbered 3302 to 3351 and/or 3381 to 3391, but not 3360 to 3373.

Minor in Technical Communication. A minor in technical communication consists of ENGL 2311 and 4380 and 12 hours from ENGL 3360, 3362, 3365, 3366, 3367, 3368, 3369, 4360, 4365, 4366, 4367, 4368, 4369, and 4378. To graduate with the minor, students must earn at least a C in each of these courses. A maximum of 3 hours of transfer credit will be accepted toward the minor.

Written Communication Requirements

ENGL 1301 and 1302 are required of all undergraduate students. Some colleges require additional hours in English; students should consult their advisors concerning required English courses.

Students who score 360 or below (verbal) on the SAT examination or 15 or below (English) on the ACT examination are required to pass ENGL 0301 or any approved assessment instrument approved by the Coordinating Board (Asset, Compass, Accuplacer, or THEA) before they can take ENGL 1301. Although ENGL 0301 appears on the transcript, the hours do not count as part of the minimum number of hours required for graduation in any degree program of the university. A grade is awarded for the semester but is not recorded on the transcript; therefore, it will not be computed in the student’s grade point average. This course counts for meeting the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements for writing skills development. Students who must fulfill this requirement should visit the TSI Office located in 78 Holden Hall.

ENGL 1301 and 1302 are prerequisites for all 2000-level English courses. Two 2000-level English courses are prerequisites for all 3000- and 4000-level English courses (except ENGL 3365 and 3366).

Curriculum Tables

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Graduate Program

Before beginning a graduate program in English or technical communication, students must consult the Director of Graduate Studies concerning departmental admission procedures and degree requirements. Admission to the Graduate School requires departmental recommendation as well as approval by the Graduate Dean. Information on the requirements is available at www.english.ttu.edu.

Master's Program

Master of Arts in English. Advanced study in literature, creative writing, and linguistics are offered in this program. It is intended to be not merely a continuation of undergraduate work but a distinctly different educational experience requiring study in greater depth and the development of critical thinking.

Applicants for the M.A. degree in English may complete 30 hours of graduate courses and a thesis or 36 hours of coursework. Areas of concentration are English and American literature, comparative literature, linguistics, and creative writing. Supporting work is available in bibliography, film, literary criticism, teaching college composition, and technical and professional writing. Reading knowledge of one foreign language is required. In their final semester in the M.A. program, thesis students must successfully complete an oral defense and non-thesis students must submit a portfolio of their work for faculty review.

Master of Arts in Technical Communication. This master’s degree combines study of the history, theory, research, and genres of technical communication with practice in applying this knowledge. The thesis option requires students to complete 24 hours of graduate courses in technical communication and electives or a minor, 6 hours of research methods, and a thesis. The non-thesis option requires students to complete 36 hours of graduate courses in technical communication, electives, and a minor. Students who elect the non-thesis option must pass a comprehensive portfolio examination in the semester of graduation.

The master’s degree in technical communication is also available online. Application and admission processes and degree requirements are similar to those for the non-thesis option for the degree. All distance students must complete 36 hours of graduate coursework in technical communication, language- and communication-related electives, or a minor. One of the courses requires a substantial independent research project that could result in an article for publication. Prospective students are advised to consult www.english.ttu.edu/tcr for details of degree requirements and the course schedule.

Doctoral Program

Doctor of Philosophy in English. The doctoral program requires both greater breadth of study than the M.A. program and greater concentration in an area selected for specialization. To fulfill these requirements the student must demonstrate a reasonably comprehensive knowledge of literature and the ability to engage in original research.

Doctoral students in English may specialize in any area of English or American literature, comparative literature, creative writing, or linguistics. They may minor outside the department or create a secondary concentration within the department in one of the above areas or in technical communication.
Coursework for the Ph.D. generally amounts to 60 hours beyond the B.A. degree, including at least 45 hours of coursework in English. All students are reviewed annually for satisfactory progress. In addition, the student must pass a qualifying examination and prepare and defend a dissertation. Reading knowledge of two foreign languages or high competence in one language is required.

Doctor of Philosophy in Technical Communication and Rhetoric.The aim of this doctoral program is to engage the students in acquiring broad knowledge of the history, theory, research, genres, and practice of technical communication and rhetoric; specialized knowledge of some aspect of communication or rhetoric; and ability to conduct independent research. The Ph.D. requires at least 60 hours of graduate courses beyond the bachelor’s degree, proficiency in research methodology, and a dissertation. The 60 hours include 45 hours in the specialization. The remaining 15 hours may be used for a minor in a field other than technical communication and rhetoric or for more courses in the specialization, including communication-related courses in other departments. A minor may be taken in one department or may consist of a cluster of courses on related topics from different departments.

The doctoral degree in technical communication and rhetoric is also available online. Application and admissions processes and degree requirements are similar to those for the on-campus
degree. In addition to fulfilling all the degree requirements of the on-campus program, all distance students must attend a two-week seminar every May. Prospective students are advised to consult www.english.ttu.edu/tcr for details of degree requirements and the course schedule.

Graduate Certificate Programs

The director of each certificate, in consultation with the director of graduate studies, will develop and specify a program of study appropriate for each student. If students decide to pursue studies beyond the certificate level, course credit earned toward the certificate can be considered toward a graduate degree.

Graduate Certificate in Book History and Digital Humanities. The Graduate Certificate in Book History and Digital Humanities requires a minimum of 15 hours of courses in English, technical communication, and related fields. These courses typically include study in topics such as history of the book, teaching history of the book, digital humanities, scholarly editing, document design, and historic letterpress printing. They can also include work in art history, museum studies, and technical communication and rhetoric, among other related fields.

Graduate Certificate in Linguistics. The Graduate Certificate in Linguistics comprises a minimum of 12 hours in linguistics courses. It usually includes study in phonology, syntax, and semantics, but flexibility is essential in meeting the diverse backgrounds, motivations, and goals of the students.

Graduate Certificate in Publishing and Editing. The Graduate Certificate in Publishing and Editing hours of courses in English and related fields. These courses typically include study in such topics as scholarly editing, magazine publishing, history of the book, technical editing, and document design. They can also include work in public relations, advertising, and other topics relevant to the contemporary publishing industry.

Graduate Certificate in Teaching Technical Communication. The Graduate Certificate in Teaching Technical Communication requires a minimum of 15 hours of either online or onsite courses and is designed for international institutions needing to provide faculty and students with instruction in how to teach technical communication and for individuals seeking to retool their English degrees to develop teaching expertise in technical communication.

 

Course Descriptions

 

Faculty

Click here to view alphabetical listing of all TTU faculty and their academic credentials.

Bruce Clarke, Ph.D., Chairperson

Horn Professor: Clarke
Professors: Baehr, Cargile Cook, Covington, Dragga, Hawkins, Hurst, Kimball, Koerber, Kolosov-Wenthe, Lang, Patterson, Poch, Purinton, Rickly,Spurgeon, Wenthe
Associate Professors: Baake, Batra, Bauer, Baugh, Borshuk, Carter, Couch, Crowell, Desens, Eaton, Kim, Kvande, McFadden, Ransdell, Rice, Samson, Shelton, Shu, Snead, Still, Zdenek
Assistant Professors:Barrera, Braver, Cortese, Faris, Hackenbracht, Hooley, McNamara, Moore, Mullen, Rukavina, Selzer King, Whitney, Wilson
Lecturers: Alvarez, Duke, Fricke, Hanson, Hiemstra, McLaughlin, Myers, RylanderBack to Top