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CONTACT INFORMATION: 101 Art Building
Box 42081, Lubbock, TX 79409-2081
T 806.742.3826, F 806.742.1971, www.depts.ttu.edu/art

About the Program

This school supervises the following degree and certificate programs:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Art
    Fields of Specialization: Art History, Studio Art
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art
    • Fields of Specialization: Communication Design, Studio Art, Visual Studies (leading toward teacher certification)
  • Master of Arts Education
  • Master of Arts in Art History
  • Master of Fine Arts in Art
    • Field of Specialization: Studio Art
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Fine Arts
    • Field of Specialization: Art (Critical Studies and Artistic Practice)
  • Graduate Certificate in Art History, Criticism, and Theory

The school’s degree programs are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. The Bachelor of Interior Design and Bachelor of Science in Apparel Design and Manufacturing degree programs in the College of Human Sciences are also accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.

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Undergraduate Program

Mission Statement. The School of Art is committed to providing a stimulating and challenging environment that will develop creative and scholarly potential in students, support faculty members in the pursuit of excellence in teaching and research, serve public and professional constituencies, and promote intercultural understandings through art.
Degree programs engage students in art through an examination of contemporary, historical, and cross-cultural issues, ideas, and actions in relation to multiple, diverse, and global visual cultures. The School of Art emphasizes exhibition opportunities, contemporary technologies, critical discourse, and interdisciplinary opportunities. The school offers students the opportunity to minor in art history, studio art, or fine art photography. Nonmajors who desire experience in the visual arts as part of their liberal education will find a varied selection of course offerings.

Transfer Students. The freshman and sophomore art curriculum is consistent with the art curriculum for higher education approved by the Coordinating Board. The School of Art at Texas Tech therefore respects the standard art core curriculum with regard to transfer credit. In some cases, a portfolio of previous work in art and a transcript of completed courses may be necessary for the purposes of advising and placement in the degree program.

Art Foundations. All students seeking a degree in art are required to take 22 hours of Art Foundations courses in the areas of studio art and art history. These courses consist of the following: ART 1100, Introduction to Art; ART 1303, Drawing I: Introduction; ART 2304, Drawing II: Introduction; ART 1302, Design I: Introduction; ART 2303, Design II: Introduction; ARTH 1301, Art History Survey I; ARTH 2302, Art History Survey II; and ARTH 3303, Art History Survey III.

Advanced Placement. Students entering art programs may be considered for advanced placement in the Art Foundations program through the College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or the School of Art Foundations Portfolio Review. Art students who score a 4 or 5 on the College Board Exams in drawing portfolio, two-dimensional design portfolio, or three-dimensional design portfolio will receive credit for Drawing I, and/or Design I, and/or Design II (3-dimensional design) (ART 1302, 1303, 2303). Students who are awarded advanced placement through the College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP) may earn 6 hours of college credit. Entering art students who receive a 4 or 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Program in art history will be exempt from taking ARTH 1301 and 2302.

Individualized Programs. Through a unified foundations program, the School of Art prepares students to develop increasingly specialized and diverse courses of study. No grade below C is accepted for transfer credit in fields of specialization, minors, concentrations, or emphases. Most upper-level art courses are repeatable for credit with a change of topics and allow for individualized instruction.

Semester Credit Hour and Contact Hour Equivalents. For most purposes a traditionally offered face-to-face course will have a minimum of 15 contact hours for each semester credit hour. Thus, a 1-credit-hour course should meet for at least 15 hours over a long semester and a 3-credit-hour course should meet for 45 hours over the semester. Courses taught during a summer session are expected to have the same number of contact hours as if they were taught during a long semester. It is permitted to offer a course in a shortened schedule, online, or in other non-traditional formats that do not meet the contact hour requirement if the course has been reviewed by a college faculty committee and the Office of the Provost and approved as having the same learning outcomes as a comparable course delivered traditionally.

In-residence students and any students in their semester of graduation must be enrolled in a minimum of one credit-bearing semester hour. Registration in remedial and other zero-credit hour coursework must be accompanied by one credit-bearing course. Should a student drop to zero credit hours, the student will be withdrawn from the institution.

Pursuant to the Texas Tech University Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog, the Texas Administrative Code, and norms stated in the NASAD Handbook, the credit and time expectations for School of Art courses are as follows:

  • For studio- or project-based courses, a standard of 30 in-class contact hours per credit hour per term is employed. Further, non-contact hour time expectations for out-of-class student activity typically range from 15 to 30 hours per credit hour per term.
  • For traditionally delivered 3-credit-hour lecture- or seminar-based courses during a regular semester, students should expect to be in class for 3 hours per week and work outside of class a minimum of 6 hours per week. For 3-credit-hour studio- or project-based courses, students should expect to be in class for 6 hours per week and work outside of class between 3 and 6 hours per week.

Studio Art Centers International (SACI). exas Tech University’s association with SACI offers students the opportunity to study studio art, art history, and the Italian language in the heart of Florence, Italy. Year-long or summer study opportunities take full advantage of the rich past of Florence, its artistic resources, cultural offerings, and SACI’s premier art facility and faculty. SACI is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.

School Residency Requirements. Students working toward a B.F.A. degree in visual studies, communication design, or studio art must complete a minimum of 30 hours of art in residence, 24 of which must be upper-division courses. Students working toward a B.A. in Art with a field of specialization in art history or studio art must complete at least 24 hours of upper-division courses in their field of specialization in residence. At least 9 hours of upper-division courses must be taken in residence for the minor.

Distance Learning Courses. Field of specialization or minor courses may not be taken by distance learning.

Writing Intensive Requirement. Students must complete at least 6 hours of writing intensive courses in their field of specialization. ART 4335, 4359, ARTH 3303, ARTV 4365, and most upper-level ARTH courses are writing intensive.

Laptop Initiative Program. As students begin their major coursework in the photography, communication design, and visual studies programs, they will be required to have a laptop computer that meets specific criteria. For current information consult the School of Art website, www.art.ttu.edu.

Minors/Concentrations. The School of Art offers three minors: art history, studio art, and fine arts photography. Declaration of one of these minors must be approved by the School of Art academic advisor prior to completion of minor coursework. Students working toward any of these minors must complete a minimum of 18-21 semester hours, which must include 9 hours of junior and senior level courses. Hours applied to the minor area of study may not include courses used to fulfill requirements in the student’s major. These courses, however, may make the student eligible immediately for upper-division courses throughout the 18-21 hours of the minor. Neither visual studies nor communication design offers a minor.

Specific requirements are as follows:

      • Art History Minor/Concentration. Students working toward an art history minor must complete a minimum of 18 hours and include ARTH 1301, 2302, and 3303. The remaining 9 hours must be taken in residence and must be chosen from a menu of courses offered at the 3000 and 4000 level. These courses are ARTH 3320, 3333, 3345, 3350, 3364, 3366, 3380, 4307, 4308, 4335, 4340, and 4389.
      • Studio Art Minor/Concentration. Students working toward a minor in studio art must complete a minimum of 18 hours of coursework in the School of Art. A 2-D studio art minor consists of ART 1302, 1303, 2304, and 9 hours in either drawing, painting, or printmaking. A 3-D studio art minor consists of ART 1303, 2303, 2304, and 9 hours in either ceramics, jewelry design and metalsmithing, or sculpture. For both the 2-D and 3-D studio art minors the remaining 9 hours will be determined by the School of Art academic advisor. Nine of the 18 required hours must be taken at the junior or senior level in residency.
      • Fine Arts Photography Minor/Concentration. Students working toward a minor in photography must complete a minimum of 21 hours. The following courses are to be taken in sequence: ART 1302, 1303, 3325, 3326, 4325 (may be repeated); ARTH 3380 (or ART 1309). All advanced hours must be taken in residence.

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Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts in Art

The Bachelor of Arts in Art will provide School of Art students with a liberal arts degree in art, offering a broader emphasis of visual arts and related studies than is currently provided through the Bachelor of Fine Arts. The bachelor of arts degree is a 120-hour program that can be completed in four years and will include the requisite percentage of studio art, art history, and general studies classes. The degree will provide students an opportunity to participate in a more individualized degree through the choice of elective courses for a minor from outside the major area discipline that is consistent with the university philosophy and policies for a liberal arts degree.

Field of Specialization in Art History

Students working toward the Bachelor of Arts in Art with a field of specialization in art history must complete 22 hours of Art Foundations courses, 30 hours of upper-level art history courses selected with the written consent of an advisor (at least 24 of which must be taken in residence, including Senior Thesis in Art History), a minor course of study from outside the major area discipline, sophomore-level in a foreign language, and the university core curriculum requirements for a B.A. in the College of Visual and Performing Arts. The number of credit hours required for a field of specialization in art history is 120 (including a minimum of 39 credit hours of art history). ARTH 3303 and most upper-level art history courses are writing intensive.

After completing three art history survey courses in Art Foundations (9 credit hours), students will achieve a breadth of study by selecting seven upper-level art history courses (21 credit hours) with at least one course from a minimum of five of the following fields: Medieval art, Renaissance and Baroque art, Native American and pre-Columbian art, Latin American art, 18th- and 19th-century European and American art, and Modern and Contemporary European and American art. Prior to the last semester of the senior year, students are required to take an additional 6 credit hours in a focus area in preparation for the senior thesis (another 3 credit hours). The capstone experience is the presentation of the senior thesis research at the Undergraduate Art History Symposium.

Art history students complete either a traditional 18-hour minorfrom outside the major area discipline or an 18-hour interdisciplinary research minor (subject to approval by the art history area advisor and the associate dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts) in collateral fields that support their art history research focus area Visual and Performing Arts) in collateral fields that support their art history research focus area.

The field of specialization in art history requires sophomore-level proficiency in a foreign language. Click here for information on the foreign language requirement.

Field of Specialization in Studio Art

The Bachelor of Arts in Art with a field of specialization in studio art provides School of Art students with a liberal arts degree in art, offering a broader emphasis of visual arts and related studies than is provided through the Bachelor of Fine Arts. Studio art courses in are carefully selected with faculty guidance and are designed to culminate in a capstone project that can take the form of a paper, project or exhibition. The capstone offers students an opportunity to synthesize their learning in a way that can provide greater understanding of the relationships between disciplines. The degree will provide students a more individualized program through the choice of elective courses for a minor from outside the major area discipline that complements the studio courses and is consistent with the university philosophy and policies for a liberal arts degree.


This field of specialization is a 120-hour program that can be completed in four years and requires 46 credit hours in studio art and art history, 9 interdisciplinary credit hours from the other areas of the College of Visual and Performing Arts (music, theatre arts, and/or dance), 18 credit hours in a minor area of study from outside the major area discipline that may also be interdisciplinary, and 44 to 54 credit hours of general education requirements as stipulated by the discipline area advisor and the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

The field of specialization in studio art requires sophomore-level proficiency in a foreign language. Click here for information on the foreign language requirement.

 

Bachelor of Fine Arts

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art will provide School of Art students with a professional degree in art, offering a comprehensive study with fields of specialization in either a 123-hour program in Communication Design, a 123-hour program in Studio Art, or a 129-hour program in Visual Studies (leading toward teacher certification). These degrees can be completed in four years and will provide students an opportunity to have an intensive and in-depth experience through visual concepts and practice.

Field of Specialization in Visual Studies

The Bachelor of Fine Arts with a field of specialization in visual studies (leading toward art teacher certification) prepares graduates for the realities facing teachers today. The program emphasizes contemporary theories and artists through the study of multiple and diverse visual cultures. Prior to student teaching, students participate in field practica in public schools and community settings.

This program requires 54 semester hours of studio art and art history, 30-36 semester hours of professional education, and 44-51 semester hours of general requirements as stipulated by the College of Visual and Performing Arts. The minimum number of hours required for visual studies (leading toward teacher certification) is a total of 129 credit hours. A minimum of 40 credit hours of junior- and senior-level courses are required for graduation.

Field of Specialization in Communication Design

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with a field of specialization in communication design addresses problem-seeking and problem-solving skills. It stresses the importance of conceptual development and the integration of form and information for the purpose of effective visual communication. The program emphasizes civic responsibility and the role of the graphic designer in the community. Students hone not only their artistic and professional skills but also their understanding of the fundamental issues of society and what, as professional artists, can do in service to others. This program prepares students for careers in design-related fields such as publication design, collateral design, and web design.

Students working toward a B.F.A. with a field of specialization in communication design must complete a minimum of 123 credit hours, including the Art Foundations coursework, 45 semester credit hours of communication design courses, 15 hours of studio art and art history electives, and the university’s core curriculum requirements for a B.F.A. in the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

The communication design curriculum is based on a series of carefully sequenced courses. All courses must be taken in sequence and successfully completed with a passing grade in order to progress within the curriculum.

All students accepted into the communication design program are required to have a laptop computer meeting specific criteria as they enter their major coursework. For more detailed information see www.art.ttu.edu (click on Laptop Initiative).

Admission to the communication design program requires specific course requirements and a portfolio review. Admission to Texas Tech University does not guarantee admission to the communication design program.

Applicants are selected each year in the spring semester (mid-April) through a rigorous portfolio and interview process. Students must prepare for the portfolio review by enrolling in ART 2388 in the spring of their first year. The prerequisites for ART 2388, 1302 and 1303 must be taken prior to enrolling in ART 2388. Students enrolled in ART 2388 must concurrently enroll in ART 2303 and ART 2304, if the courses have not been not taken previously.

Communication design is a limited-access program and the selection process is highly competitive. Students who are not accepted have the option of reapplying one final time during the subsequent review process in the next spring semester. Students can complete the program in communication design in four years if they are accepted upon the first portfolio review.

A portfolio review will occur during the fall semester of a student’s third year in the communication design curriculum. A faculty panel will review work produced in ART 3381, 3382, 3383, 3384, and 4357. A student whose work is found to be unsatisfactory will enter a probationary period but may continue taking courses within the curriculum. The faculty panel will conduct a second review the following spring semester. If the student’s new work demonstrates improvement, the probationary period will be concluded. In the event that satisfactory improvements have not been made, the student will be dismissed from the program and may not pursue readmission.

Field of Specialization in Studio Art

The Bachelor of Fine Arts with a field of specialization in studio art offers depth in the studio areas and requires 82 hours of art and art history courses in addition to the 38 to 51 hours of general requirements as stipulated by the College of Visual and Performing Arts. One-third of the semester hours in studio art above the Art Foundations must be outside the student’s area of emphasis and must be chosen with advisor approval. The minimum number of hours required in studio art is 123. A minimum of 40 credit hours of junior- and senior-level courses is required for graduation.

Upon completion of the Studio and Art History Foundations courses, students must select an area of emphasis from ceramics, jewelry design and metalsmithing, painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpture, with the approval of faculty advisors. Within the studio art field of specialization and after approval of an advisor, a student may take a distribution of courses that combine digital media, photography, and printmaking. This combination of courses will enable students to experiment with various media and the technical aspects of digital imagery in creating fine art.

Students must take each course in their area of emphasis at least once prior to graduation. Students graduating in studio art are required to participate in a group exhibition during the spring semester of their graduating year.

Students selecting a concentration in painting will be expected to submit paintings or a combination of painting and drawing for a portfolio review during their first or second painting class (ART 3321 or 3322) in order to be admitted to the area. Students who are not selected in the first review of their work may submit once more before they are required to identify another concentration.

Students selecting a concentration in photography will be expected to submit photographs for a portfolio review after the first class (ART 3325) in order to be admitted to the area. Students who are not selected in the first review of their work may submit once more before they are required to identify another concentration.eview of their work may submit once more before they are required to identify another concentration.

 

Curriculum Tables

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Graduate Program

For specific admission requirements and procedures for each program, see the School of Art website at www.art.ttu.edu.

 

Master of Arts Education

The Master of Arts Education (M.A.E.) degree program is comprised of a minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate work that includes 12 semester hours of art education core courses; 9-12 semester hours of related art courses; 6-9 semester hours as a minor (taken outside the school or with the option of classes within the School of Art); and a minimum of 6 semester hours of thesis, professional project, or studio problem leading to an art exhibition. The M.A.E. graduate coordinator will evaluate applicants who have met the minimum entrance requirements of the Graduate School. The applicant for the M.A.E. degree must submit a portfolio and/or slides of his or her art and, if possible, examples of student art to the preview committee. On the basis of these requirements, the preview committee will make recommendations concerning the acceptance of students to the M.A.E. degree program and will determine and prescribe any leveling work to be completed before or after acceptance. Teacher certification is available with an additional 18 hours of coursework and student teaching. Students applying for the Master of Arts Education degree program do not need to submit scores for the Graduate Record Examination.

 

Master of Arts in Art History

Art history investigates the intellectual and cultural products of human activity by focusing on artifacts, artworks, and monuments from around the globe. The Master of Arts in Art History prepares students for doctoral studies in art history and related fields. Those who earn the M.A. will be prepared for a variety of positions in museums and cultural organizations and for teaching in institutions that do not require the terminal degree.

The M.A. in Art History requires a minimum of 30 hours of post-baccalaureate study, including two required art historical theory and methodology courses (ARTH 5308 and 5309), 12 hours of graduate art history topics, 6 hours of an extra-departmental minor, and 6 hours of thesis. Additionally, the degree requires reading knowledge of at least one foreign language.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, will craft a broad curriculum from the following areas: contemporary art and critical theory; European art from ancient and medieval through modern with emphases on the Mediterranean, Italy, France, and northern Europe; colonial and modern Latin American, Chicano/a art, Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican and Native American. The program also offers two trans-geographic areas of concentration: art of borderlands and contact zones and history of the book as art.

 

Master of Fine Arts

The Master of Fine Arts degree (M.F.A.) is the recognized terminal degree in the practice of art. It is offered with a major in art and requires a minimum of 60 semester hours of graduate work.

Specialization is possible in the areas of ceramics, jewelry design and metal-smithing, painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpture. Drawing may be selected as a secondary studio option or studio elective. Admission to the M.F.A. program normally presumes that students hold a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in studio art. A graduate preview committee, composed of three graduate faculty members in the school, will examine a portfolio of the student’s work and hold a personal interview, if feasible, with each student who meets the minimum entrance requirements of the Graduate School. On the basis of these examinations, the preview committee will make recommendations concerning acceptance to the M.F.A. program and will determine and prescribe any leveling work to be completed before or after acceptance. Students applying for the Master of Fine Arts degree program do not need to submit scores for the Graduate Record Examination.

 

Ph.D. in Fine Arts

Within the Doctor of Philosophy in Fine Arts degree, the field of specialization in the School of Art is titled “Critical Studies and Artistic Practice.” Students in this program examine diverse discourses in the visual arts, exploring their trans-disciplinary margins as well as their disciplinary strengths. In addition to the Fine Arts Core of 15 hours, students enroll in a Critical Studies and Artistic Practice Core of 12 hours, consisting of interdisciplinary topics in the visual arts. Beyond the two groups of core classes, students must complete a minimum of 33 hours of individualized coursework, including 12 hours of dissertation work. Individualized coursework may be chosen, with consent of the advisor, from two of the following fields: history of art, art education, critical studies, museum studies, arts administration, and studio art (if the student holds an appropriate master’s), as well as theatre and music. Additional coursework may be undertaken; however, the State of Texas limits students to 99 hours of doctoral study.

The residence requirement for the fine arts doctoral program is fulfilled by satisfactory completion of 18 semester hours of graduate coursework during one 12-month period. This is usually accomplished with one consecutive fall-spring schedule, or summer sessions I and II consecutive with either a fall or a spring semester.

For acceptance into the doctoral program, we strongly recommend but do not require that the applicant have a master’s degree, or its equivalent, with emphasis in a visual arts area. Every effort is made to select candidates who show strong scholarship and professional competence. Art doctoral faculty will evaluate each applicant’s professional goals and any evidence of progress toward these goals. More specific qualifications will pertain to specific career directions. Applicants must include GRE scores.

For admission into this program, the graduate visual studies and art history-criticism faculty review the applicant’s dossier. A personal interview is recommended. Faculty submit recommendations to a three-member preview committee. If approved, the applicant is recommended by the committee to the college’s Graduate Committee for acceptance into the program. Acceptance is also contingent upon meeting the admission requirements of the Graduate School. After admission, a specific degree plan is determined.

 

Graduate Certificate in Art History, Criticism, and Theory

The Graduate Certificate in Art History, Criticism, and Theory comprises a minimum of 15 semester hours of graduate work that includes 6 semester hours of required courses and 9 semester hours of related courses in art history and criticism chosen in consultation with the graduate advisor for art history. Six semester hours in art history at the undergraduate or graduate level are a prerequisite (recommended) or corequisite for this certificate. Students who have met the minimum entrance requirements of the Graduate School should apply there and to the Graduate Certificate Coordinator, School of Art, for entry into the certificate program. The Graduate School will issue the certificate upon completion of the required 15 semester hours of coursework. Courses completed as requirements for another program (e.g., a minor field of study) can be applied toward the certificate.

 

Credit and Time Requirements

For most purposes a traditionally offered face-to-face course will have a minimum of 15 contact hours for each semester credit hour. Thus, a 1-credit-hour course should meet for at least 15 hours over a long semester and a 3-credit-hour course should meet for 45 hours over the semester. Courses taught during a summer session are expected to have the same number of contact hours as if they were taught during a long semester. It is permitted to offer a course in a shortened schedule, online, or in other non-traditional formats that do not meet the contact hour requirement if the course has been reviewed by a college faculty committee and the Office of the Provost and approved as having the same learning outcomes as a comparable course delivered traditionally.

In-residence students and any students in their semester of graduation must be enrolled in a minimum of one credit-bearing semester hour. Registration in remedial and other zero-credit hour coursework must be accompanied by one credit-bearing course. Should a student drop to zero credit hours, the student will be withdrawn from the institution.

Pursuant to the Texas Tech University Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog, the Texas Administrative Code, and norms stated in the NASAD Handbook, the credit and time expectations for School of Art courses are as follows:

  • For studio- or project-based courses, a standard of 30 in-class contact hours per credit hour per term is employed. Further, non-contact hour time expectations for out-of-class student activity typically range from 15 to 30 hours per credit hour per term.
  • For traditionally delivered 3-credit-hour lecture- or seminar-based courses during a regular semester, students should expect to be in class for 3 hours per week and work outside of class a minimum of 6 hours per week. For 3-credit-hour studio- or project-based courses, students should expect to be in class for 6 hours per week and work outside of class between 3 and 6 hours per week.

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Course Descriptions

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Faculty

Click here to view alphabetical listing of all TTU faculty and their academic credentials.

Lydia Thompson, M.F.A., Director

Professors: Dingus, Fuentes, Glover, A. Martin, Morrow, Tate, Thompson, Wink
Associate Professors: Akins-Tillet, W. Cannings, Check, Chua, Cortez, Elko, Elliott, Flueckiger, D. Fowler, Germany, Granados, Lindsay,Orfila, Ortega, Slagle, Steele, Tedeschi, Venhuizen, Yoo
Assistant Professors: Gong, Humphreys, Ög˘ üs-Uzun
Adjunct Faculty: S. Cannings, C. Fowler, Milosevich, Peaslee, SizerBack to Top