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CONTACT INFORMATION: 103 Music Building
Box 42033, Lubbock, TX 79409-2033
T 806.742.2270, F 806.742.2294, www.depts.ttu.edu/music

About the Program

The school supervises the following degree programs and certificates:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Music
  • Bachelor of Music in Music
    Fields of Specialization: Music (leading toward teacher certification), Composition, Performance, Theory
  • Master of Music Education
  • Master of Music in Music
    Fields of Specialization: Composition, Conducting (pending NASM Plan Approval), Music Theory, Musicology, Pedagogy, Performance
  • Doctor of Musical Arts
    Fields of Specialization: Composition, Conducting, Performance, Piano Pedagogy
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Fine Arts
    Field of Specialization: Music
  • Undergraduate Certificate in Community Arts Entrepreneurship
  • Undergraduate Certificate in Jazz Studies
  • Undergraduate Certificate in World Music
  • Graduate Certificate in Early Music Performance Practice
  • Graduate Certificate in Piano Pedagogy

The school also participates in the ethnic studies and humanities minor programs. The school’s degree programs are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music.

 

Undergraduate Program

General Information

Admission and Assessment Requirements. Students applying to the School of Music will be admitted as “music audition required” (MUAR) until their audition. Acceptance to Texas Tech University does not ensure admission as a music major. Music majors must audition in their declared principle applied area with the appropriate faculty for acceptance into any music program. After acceptance into the School of Music, music majors will participate in applied and academic assessment during each semester of enrollment. Students must maintain a grade of C or above in every course designated as part of the major area music curriculum. Students not receiving a grade of C in such course(s), will be allowed to repeat the course(s) twice to achieve the minimum grade of C. University policy states that a student may repeat a course for credit only one time at the normal tuition rate; those repeating a course more than once must pay an additional cost-of-education fee. Students who do not receive a minimum grade of C in a major area course after repeating it twice will no longer be able to continue their status as a music major and must declare a major other than music. See the academic advisor in the School of Music for specific details regarding courses constituting the major area music curriculum.

To qualify for advancement, students must earn a minimum grade of C during each semester of freshman and sophomore theory and aural skills.

Students wishing to change their field of specialization to performance after having been accepted into another field of specialization in music must proceed through a formal acceptance process for performance in the appropriate applied and ensemble areas. Additional information about applied music is available from the School of Music. Graduation requirements in applied music vary according to the student’s degree and field of specialization.

Entering freshmen may receive credit for college-level work in music accomplished prior to entering the university. This may be done through advanced standing examinations administered by the faculty of the School of Music during the first semester of the freshman year after the student has obtained permission from the Academic Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts. Advanced standing examinations will be administered only in the fields of applied music and music theory. To receive credit by an advanced standing examination, the student must achieve a grade of not less than a B on such examination.

All students whose principal instrument is not keyboard must demonstrate keyboard proficiency as determined by the school.

Refer to the curriculum tables that follow and consult with an advisor for specific ensemble requirements pertaining to particular degree plans.

Residency Requirements. Students working toward a Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music (leading toward teacher certification), or a Bachelor of Arts in Music must complete a minimum of 24 hours of music in residence at Texas Tech. Minors in music require minimum of 9 hours in residence at Texas Tech. Information is available in the School of Music office.

Recital Requirements. Performance students are required to present a half-length junior recital and a full-length senior recital. Candidates for music with teacher certification must present a half-length recital. The recital program must be approved by the appropriate area faculty or applied faculty member and submitted to the Publicity Office at least two weeks prior to the recital for processing. Permission to present each recital must be obtained from an examining jury at least two weeks prior to the recital.

Music composition students are required to present a recital of their original compositions during the senior year. Permission to present the recital must be obtained from the composition faculty one semester prior to the recital.

Postponement or cancellation of a scheduled recital (without penalty) is allowed only with good reason such as illness or death in the family. Failure to pass a hearing or failure of preparation are not valid reasons. The appropriate applied faculty member must verify any reason for postponement or cancellation. If a recital is postponed for verified good reason, the student may reschedule in the same or subsequent semester. If a scheduled recital is postponed or canceled without verified good reason, the student may not reschedule during the same semester in which postponement or cancellation occurs.

All School of Music undergraduate music majors enrolled in applied lessons are expected to experience a broad range of repertory through attendance each semester at such performance events as recitals, guest artist concerts, ensemble concerts, chamber music concerts, opera and music theatre productions, Lubbock Symphony Orchestra, and Presidential Lecture and Performance Series events.

Semester Credit Hour and Contact Hour Equivalents. Pursuant to the Texas Tech University Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog, the Texas Administrative Code, and the norms stated in the NASM Handbook, credit and time expectations for School of Music courses are as follows:

  • For applied lessons, the standard requirement is one contact hour of one-on-one instruction and one contact hour of studio class per week, thus totaling 30 in-class contact hours per semester. In addition, an average of two non-contact hours per day are expected for out-of-class student practice.
  • For traditionally delivered 3-credit-hour lecture- and seminar-based courses during a regular semester, students should expect to be in class for three hours per week and work outside of class a minimum of six hours per week. For 3-credit-hour studio- and project-based courses, students should expect to be in class for six hours per week and work outside of class between three and six hours per week.
  • For large ensembles, students should expect to be in class for a minimum of three hours per week for 1 credit hour. Small and medium ensembles normally meet in class a minimum of one hour per week for 1 credit hour.

All tracks have the same core curriculum and professional education courses.

Core Curriculum. All tracks have the same core curriculum and professional education courses. Consult an advisor for specific courses.

Semester Hours
Written Communication (ENGL 1301 and 1302)
6
Oral Communication
3
Mathematics
6
Life and Physical Sciences
8
United States History
6
United States and Texas Government
6
Social and Behavioral Sciences (See an advisor)
3
Language, Philosophy, and Culture
3
Creative Arts
3
TOTAL HOURS

Students who will graduate under a catalog previous to 2012-2013 must meet the Technology and Applied Science requirement of the core.

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Minor/Concentration in Music. A student may seek a minor in music by completing 18 hours selected in consultation with the undergraduate advisor in the School of Music.

Courses for Nonmajors. Nonmusic majors may elect class or private instruction in voice or in any instrument subject to the availability of faculty. Students enrolled in applied music are carried at their maximum level of achievement, and the nonmusic major is not examined in competition with the music major. In addition to the above, courses designed to serve all students enrolled in the university include all major ensembles such as Marching Band (fall only—MUEN 1103, 3103, 3203); Symphonic, Concert, and University Bands (MUEN 3103, 3203); Orchestra (MUEN 3104, 3204); University Choir (MUEN 3101, 3201); University Singers, Women’s Chorus and Matador Singers (MUEN 3101); Music Theatre (MUEN 3102, 3202); Jazz Ensembles (MUEN 3105); and Small/Medium Ensembles (MUEN 3106, 3110). Auditions are required for most of these ensembles; contact the ensembles office at 806.742.2272 for information about auditions. The following courses are designed specifically for nonmajors:

MUAP 1113, Voice. Open to both majors and nonmajors. Correct posture and studies for breath control, development of resonance, study of vowel formation, vocalization.

MUAP 1123, 1124, Group Keyboard Instruction I and II. Consent of instructor required. Beginning instruction in piano and electronic keyboards. Sight reading, harmonization and transposition, solo and ensemble repertoire, and playing techniques.

MUHL 1308, Music in Western Civilization. Introductory course for non-music majors in the history of music and its role in western civilization from the Middle Ages through the 20th century and beyond. Fulfills core Creative Arts credit.

MUHL 2304, History of Jazz. Historical and analytical survey of jazz from its beginning through “Rock”—its form, style, literature, and influence on 20th century music. Fulfills core Creative Arts credit.

MUHL 2308, Musics of Latin America. Traditions, styles, and history of Latin American musics: Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Panama, Guatemala, Argentina, Brazil, Perú, Venezuela. Fulfills core Creative Arts requirement.

MUHL 2310, History of Rock and Roll. Focuses on hearing, understanding, and contextualizing Anglo-American rock and roll, a popular idiom rooted in the music of African Americans and rural whites. Fulfills core Creative Arts requirement..

MUTH 1300, Songwriting. A beginning course for nonmusic majors. A practical approach to music theory through songwriting. Includes aural training, notation, textual setting, melodic writing, and chord assignment. Fulfills core Creative Arts requirement..

 

Bachelor of Arts in Music

A minimum of 42 hours of music courses, 18 hours of which must be junior or senior level, are required for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a music major, including MUSI 1300, MUHL 2301, 2302, 2303, MUTH 1103 and 1203, 1104 and 1204, 2103 and 2203, 2104 and 2204, and 3303. Bachelor of Arts students are required to enroll in four semesters of ensemble and lessons. The degree will provide students an opportunity to participate in a more individualized degree through the choice of elective courses for a minor from outside the major area discipline that is consistent with the university philosophy and policies for a liberal arts degree and complete the general degree requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. A minimum total of 120 hours is required for this degree.

 

Bachelor of Music in Music

The Bachelor of Music in Music has four fields of specialization: music (leading toward teacher certification), composition, performance, and theory. The performance field of specialization includes concentrations in piano, organ, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion, and stringed instruments. The field of specialization in music that leads toward teacher certification replaces the former Bachelor of Music Education.

For requirements in the fields of specialization in composition, performance, and theory, consult the curriculum tables that appear below.

 

Field of Specialization in Music LeadingToward Teacher Certification

The curriculum tables that follow are provided as a recommended sequence to students and advisors. All B.M. students pursuing a field of specialization in music must plan their individual courses of study in consultation with the School of Music advisor and consult the advisor for any revisions to the curriculum.

Students should contact the College of Education concerning professional education course requirements for all-level certification.

Semester Hours
MUED 431\5
3
MUED 4323
3
MUED 3311
3
MUED 3312
3
Student Teaching
6
TOTAL HOURS
18

All Level, Vocal Track

Principal Instrument: MUAP 1001, 1002, 2001, 2002, 3001 (2 credit hours each); 3002 (1), 3190
Diction I: MUAP 1303
Vocal Pedagogy: MUAP 4205
Conducting: MUAP 3206, and 3207
Piano: Must pass proficiency level equivalent to MUAP 2124 if not piano principal.
Music: MUSI 1101, 1300, 3216, 3237, and either MUSI 3238 or 3217
Music History and Literature: MUHL 2301, 3302, 3303
Music Theory: MUTH 1103 and 1203, 1104 and 1204, 2103 and 2203, 2104 and 2204, 3303
Major Ensemble: 7 semesters
Instrumental Ensemble: MUEN 2101 (1 semester)
Total Track Hours: 62
Total Program Hours: 122

All Level, Instrumental Track

Principal Instrument: MUAP 1001, 1002, 2001, 2002, 3001 (2 credit hours each); 3002 (1), 3190
Secondary Instrument: MUAP 1103, 1104, 2103, 2104, 3103, 3104, 4103, 4104 (select 5)
Conducting: MUAP 3206 and 3208
Piano: Must pass proficiency level equivalent to MUAP 2124 if not piano principal.
Music: MUSI 1101, 1300, 3237; either 3218 or 3325; take one of MUSI 3226, 3238, and 3219
Music History and Literature: MUHL 2301, 3302, 3303
Music Theory: MUTH 1103 and 1203, 1104 and 1204, 2103 and 2203, 2104 and 2204, 3303
Major Ensemble: 7 semesters
Vocal Ensemble: MUEN 2102 (1 semester)
Total Track Hours: 62
Total Program Hours:122

All Level, Keyboard Track

Principal Instrument: MUAP 1001 (2), 1105, 1002 (2), 1106, 2001 (2), 2002 (2), 3001 (2), 3002 (1), 3190
Vocal Pedagogy: MUAP 4205
Conducting: MUAP 3206 and 3207 or 3208
Music: MUSI 1101, 1300, 3216, 3237, and either MUSI 3238 or 3217
Music History and Literature: MUHL 2301, 3302, 3303
Music Theory: MUTH 1103 and 1203, 1104 and 1204, 2103 and 2203, 2104 and 2204, 3303
Major Ensemble: 7 semesters
Ensemble: MUEN 2101 or 2102
Total Track Hours: 61
Total Program Hours: 121

Advanced Bachelor’s-to-Master’s Degree. Advanced music education undergraduates may apply for admission to the B.M.+M.M.Ed. program. Admission allows qualified students to count 9 hours toward both an undergraduate degree and a Master of Music Education degree (either the 30-hour thesis track or 36-hour non-thesis track). Application should be made during the first semester of the junior year following procedures available from School of Music graduate or undergraduate academic advisors. The program is designed for exceptional undergraduate music education majors who wish to complete the M.M.Ed. degree in full- or part-time graduate study during Texas Tech’s summers-only program or in some combination of the two. This allows educators to maintain a full-time teaching position while pursuing an advanced degree.

 

Undergraduate Certificates

Community Arts Entrepreneurship. The School of Music, under the general supervision of the Vernacular Music Center, offers a 15-hour Undergraduate Certificate in Community Arts Entrepreneurship, particularly aimed at practitioners and participants in community arts. It provides practical and applicable skills for future arts administrators, working artists, performers, presenters, and community advocates. The certificate is available in either administrative or artistic practice concentrations (according to electives).

For most working artists/educators it is valuable, for both personal careers and artistic and creative campus and community projects, to develop strong skills in management, budgeting, promotions, and media. Those interested in advanced degrees will find material advantage through this foundational undergraduate certificate. Those involved in K-12 education will be greatly facilitated in speaking and advocating on behalf of their program initiatives.

Required courses for the certificate are PSY 3301, BA 3305, and VPA 3301. Students additionally select two 3-hour electives from BA 3302, ADV 3310, COMS 3356 (administrative concentration); or EMC 3300, ANTH 3300, ART 4304 (artistic concentration). Certificate candidates are also encouraged to participate actively in creative activities through the college. Contact information: Dr Christopher J Smith, School of Music, 806.834.2275, christopher.smith@ttu.edu.

Jazz Studies. The School of Music offers a 17-hour Undergraduate Certificate in Jazz Studies to provide students with a foundation in the skills necessary to be a successful performer in the jazz idiom. The certificate program combines lecture and laboratory courses (performance ensembles) with private study, much like the mentor/apprentice tradition seen throughout the history of jazz music.
Music education students are often required to teach jazz music and direct jazz ensembles after entering the workforce as professional music educators. Successful completion of this certificate program will make students more competitive in this job market.

The certificate requires the following courses: MUEN 3105 and 3106, MUTH 3205 (may substitute MUSI 4000–Jazz/Commercial Arranging with permission of program coordinator), MUAP 1001 and 3205, and MUHL 2304. Contact information: Stephen Jones, School of Music, 806.834.8379, stephen.jones@ttu.edu

World Music. The School of Music offers a 15-hour Undergraduate Certificate in World Music. For most scholars involved in teaching or research, there is an expectation of familiarity with global music styles. Those interested in advanced degrees will find material advantage in this undergraduate certificate study. Those involved in K-12 education will be greatly facilitated in meeting global music and cultural diversity requirements. This certificate complements programs in music education, music composition, performance, and the Bachelor of Arts in Music.

The required courses for the certificate are MUHL 4300 (6 hours, requires topic approval), DAN 4301, MUEN 3110 (3 hours). Students can select one 3-hour elective from MUHL 4300, ANTH 4305, MUSI 3341, or MUSI 4000. Contact information: Dr. Christopher J. Smith, School of Music, 806.834.2275, christopher.smith@ttu.edu; or Dr. Thomas M. Cimarusti, School of Music, 806.834.6239, thomas.cimarusti@ttu.edu

 

Curriculum Tables.

 

Graduate Program

The School of Music offers two master’s degrees with six fields of specialization, a Doctor of Philosophy degree, a Doctor of Musical Arts with four fields of specialization, and two graduate certificates.

 

Master’s Program

Master of Music in Music. The M.M. in Music degree offers fields of specialization in composition, conducting, music theory, musicology, pedagogy, and performance. The degree consists of a minimum of 30 hours of graduate work, including recitals for the performance student, thesis for the musicology or music theory student, and an original composition for the composition student. The Master of Music degree in string pedagogy or keyboard pedagogy may be attained with a 36-hour program without a thesis. For the performance student, two public performances are required. Both performances must be judged satisfactory by the student’s applied music faculty committee. The conducting student may present either two performances or one with a paper in support of the performance.

Master of Music Education. The Master of Music Education degree may be attained with a 30-hour program that includes a thesis or a 36-hour program without a thesis.

 

Doctoral Program

Doctor of Musical Arts. The Doctor of Musical Arts degree is a 45-hour program oriented toward professional practice in music emphasizing the creation or performance of musical works and the application and transmission of knowledge about musical works. Fields of specialization are in performance, conducting, composition, and piano pedagogy. A nondissertation program, the degree culminates in four doctoral performance projects which are designed to suit the professional interests and aspirations of the student. A research document is a component of this final doctoral project. Of singular importance is the inclusion of 3 credit hours of fine arts courses drawn from visual arts, theatre, aesthetics, and other related areas of study. Additional information may be obtained from the School of Music.

Doctor of Philosophy in Fine Arts. The music field of specialization in the Ph.D. in Fine Arts consists of a minimum of 60 semester hours, which includes fine arts requirements and electives, an individualized music curriculum, and a dissertation. Concentrations are in musicology, theory, music education, and administration. The residence requirement for the fine arts doctoral program is fulfilled by satisfactory completion of 18 semester hours of graduate coursework during one 12-month period. This program is explained in the introductory catalog section to the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

Language Requirements. The musicology concentration in the doctoral program requires competency in one foreign language. Other concentrations may or may not have this requirement, depending on the dissertation area. Except for the musicology concentration (one foreign language), no foreign language requirement exists for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree, the Master of Music degree, or the Master of Music Education degree. Vocal performance students and choral conducting students must demonstrate singing proficiency in French, German, and Italian.

 

Graduate Certificates

Graduate Certificate in Early Music Performance Practice. The 15-credit Graduate Certificate in Early Music Performance Practice provides graduate music majors with the option of tailoring their coursework and medium ensemble participation to focus on the research and performance of medieval, Renaissance and Baroque music. This resume-enhancing certificate is especially recommended for musicology, theory, choral, or vocal/instrumental students who wish to obtain the in-demand skills required of specialists in the dynamic area of early music scholarship and performance.

The Graduate Certificate in Piano Pedagogy. This graduate certificate is designed for the professional piano teacher. The 13- to 17-hour curriculum, with flexible scheduling, provides enrichment and skill development both musically and pedagogically. It can also assist participants in qualifying as Nationally Certified Teachers of Music through Music Teachers National Association.

 

Admission

Some applicants for admission to graduate programs in music are required to submit scores for the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination. Students applying for the Master of Music in a performance concentration or the Doctor of Musical Arts degree programs do not need to submit these scores. Students beginning a graduate degree program take placement tests in music history and music theory, as well as in applied music if the major is performance or in music education if the major is music education. Texas Tech graduates with a bachelor’s degree in music or music education are also required to take the placement examinations. All placement and preliminary examinations are administered by the School of Music during the registration period of each semester. Deficiencies, if any, may be removed by appropriate leveling work. The prospective graduate student should also consult the Graduate School section of this catalog for admissions requirements.

 

Credit and Time Requirements

Pursuant to the Texas Tech University Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog, the Texas Administrative Code, and norms stated in the NASM Handbook, the credit and time expectations for School of Music graduate courses are as follows:

  • For studio- or project-based courses, in-class contact hours typically include a combination of indivudual meetings and group activities that may vary by studio discipline and instructor. Total time expectations for in- and out-of-class student activity typically range from 45 to 60 hours per credit hour per semester.
  • For traditionally delivered 3-credit-hour lecture- and seminar-based courses during a regular semester, students should expect to be in class for 3 hours per week and work outside of class a minimum of 6 hours per week. For 3-credit-hour studio- and project-based courses, students should expect to devote 9 to 12 hours to the course per week.

 

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Course Descriptions

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Faculty

Click here to view alphabetical listing of all TTU faculty and their academic credentials.

William L. Ballenger, M.A., Director

Horn Professor: Westney
Professors: Ballenger, Becker, Bjella, Brumfield, Deahl, D. Dees, Dent, Dolter, Gilbert, Henry, Killian, Meek, Rogers, L. Santa, M. Santa, Shea, Shinn, C.J. Smith, C.M. Smith, Stoune, Strieder
Associate Professors: Anderson, Cash, Cimarusti, Cruse, Decker, Dye, Fischer, Fried, Hollins, Hughes, Jocoy, Lastrapes, Martens, McKoin, Morton, A. Smith, Wass
Assistant Professors: Allen, Ankrum, Brookes, Chalex, Forrest, Haugland, Henninger, Hill, Jones, Lin, Salazar, Sparr, Stetson
Adjunct Instructors: Barrick, Brandon, J. Dees, LandesBack to Top