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Core Curriculum Requirements for Students Entering Texas Tech under a
Catalog Dated 2014-15 or Later

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CommunicationMathematics

Life and Physical SciencesLanguage, Philosophy, and Culture

Creative Arts

Social and Behavioral SciencesAmerican History

Government/Political Science

 
Additional graduation requirements (i.e., multicultural, language,
writing intensive courses) can be accessed using the Quick Links at

www.depts.ttu.edu/officialpublications/catalog/_Academics.php#top
.

The core curriculum is designed to expose all Texas Tech University graduates to areas of study that are traditionally regarded as basic to the intellectual development of a broadly educated person. These areas of study include: life and physical sciences; social and behavioral sciences; mathematics; language, philosophy, and culture; creative arts; American history; political science/government; and the tools of communication and thought. The Texas Tech University core curriculum complies with Texas statutes and Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board rules. Students should refer to college and department degree requirements when choosing core curriculum courses.

A. Communication: 9 hours

Courses in this core component area focus on developing ideas and expressing them clearly, considering the effect of the message, fostering understanding, and building the skills needed to maximize the potential for effecting change through communication. Courses involve the command of oral, aural, written, and visual literacy skills that enable people to exchange messages appropriate to the subject, occasion, and audience.

Students graduating from Texas Tech University should be able to develop ideas and express them clearly, considering the effect of the message, fostering understanding, and building the skills needed to communicate effectively.

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B. Mathematics: 6 hours

Courses in this core component area focus on quantitative literacy in logic, patterns and relationships. Courses involve the understanding of key mathematical concepts and the application of appropriate quantitative tools to everyday experience.

Students graduating from Texas Tech University should demonstrate the ability to apply quantitative and logical skills to solve problems.

MATH 1350

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C. Life and Physical Sciences: 8 hours (two 3 hour lecture classes, each with a related 1-hour laboratory class)

Texas Tech University also has a 2-hour science laboratory requirement that is not a part of the core curriculum. This requirement may be satisfied by taking two four hour combined lecture and lab science courses (for example, BIOL 1401 and 1402) or two 3- hour science lecture courses along with the accompanying laboratory courses (for example, ATMO 1300 and 1100, GEOL 1303 and 1101). It is also permissible to take one 4-hour science course and one 3-hour science course along with the accompanying laboratory course (such as BIOL 1401 and ATMO 1300 with ATMO 1100). Credit toward the science laboratory requirement is not granted for laboratory courses that do not share the same course prefix as the lecture course taken to satisfy a portion of the life and physical sciences core requirement.

For information about how transfer students who present 3-hour science courses may complete the science laboratory requirement see “Science Laboratory Requirement."

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D. Language, Philosophy, and Culture: 3 hours

Courses in this core component area focus on how ideas, values, beliefs, and other aspects of culture reflect and affect human experience. Courses involve the exploration of ideas that foster aesthetic and intellectual creation in order to understand the human condition across cultures.

Students graduating from Texas Tech University should be able to think critically and evaluate possible multiple interpretations, cultural and historical contexts, and values.

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E. Creative Arts: 3 hours

Courses in this core component area focus on the appreciation and analysis of creative artifacts and works of the human imagination. Courses involve the synthesis and interpretation of artistic expression and enable critical, creative, and innovative communication about works of art.

Students graduating from Texas Tech University should be able to construct, present, and defend critical and aesthetic judgments of works in the creative arts.

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F. Social and Behavioral Sciences: 3 hours

Courses in this core component area focus on the consideration of past events relative to the United States, with the option of including Texas history for a portion of this component area. Courses involve the interaction among individuals, communities, states, the nation, and the world, considering how these interactions have contributed to the development of the United States and its global role.

Students graduating from Texas Tech University should demonstrate an understanding of the historical origins of the United States and be able to identify and describe the importance of key individuals and events in United States and/or Texas history.

 

H. Government/Political Science: 6 hours

Courses in this core component area focus on consideration of the Constitution of the United States and the constitutions of the states, with special emphasis on that of Texas. Students who complete their government requirement outside the State of Texas or from a Texas private institution will need to provide a transcript that verifies they have taken a course with the required Texas and United States constitution content. If verification is not provided, students may be required to complete POLS 2107, Federal and Texas Constitutions, to ensure they have attained the required competency. Courses involve the analysis of governmental institutions, political behavior, civic engagement, and their political and philosophical foundations.

Students graduating from Texas Tech University should demonstrate an understanding of the organization and functions of the different levels of government in the United States, be able to explain the importance of the United States Constitution and those of the states, and be able to comment on the role of civic engagement in United States politics and culture.

GOVT 2305
GOVT 2306

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