Texas Tech University

Program

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Day 1- February 21, 2017

Time

Content

Location

11:00 a.m.– 5:00 pm

Registration/Check-in

Alumni Lounge

11:45 a.m. -1:20 pm

Welcome, Luncheon & Keynote

Welcome and Introductory Remarks:

Dr. Lawrence Schovanec, President, Texas Tech University
Dr. Michael Galyean, Interim Provost, Texas Tech University

Keynote Presenter:

Keynote speaker

Speaker:

Dr. Andy Furco, Associate Vice President for Public Engagement & Professor of Higher Education, University of Minnesota

The Engaged Campus: Securing the Goals of Higher Education through Community Engagement

Over the past decade, higher education has witnessed a fundamental shift in its overall approach to community engagement. At the heart of this shift is the more intentional and integral role that community engagement is playing within the core academic agenda. This shift is challenging and disrupting a number of higher education's longstanding, traditional structures, policies, and norms of practice. In his presentation Dr. Furco examines this shift, the growing popularity of the "engaged campus" philosophy, and ways in which higher education institutions are responding and adapting to this new engagement agenda.

 

Plains/Alexander (119 D/E)

1:30 p.m. -2:20 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 1.1

 

A University Race Relations Class that Made a Positive Difference (SL5)

Presenter

Peter L. Kranz, Professor of Counseling, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Abstract

A race relations class taught for 6 years in the deep south was unique in structure and process. The result was students making meaningful changes in racial attitudes and feelings. The course also received national media attention due to its uniqueness and positive results. In retrospective studies, 20 years later, former students described the course as having had life-changing impacts and recommended that similar courses be taught at the university-level. During this interactive presentation, participants will gain an understanding of the course’s structure and techniques, the roles of all partners involved, and lessons learned.  

 

Bridging the Gap between Practice and Education (CP1)

Presenters

Sharon Cannon, Regional Dean/Professor, School of Nursing, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center - Odessa

Carol Boswell, Professor, School of Nursing, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center - Odessa

Abstract

Within the evolving world of health care, partnerships between practice and education are becoming of principal significance. The practice arena within communities who are striving to address health issues is demanding community action to tackle the increasing concerns generated as healthcare changes occur with rapid succession. In an attempt to close the gaps identified, a Center of Excellence in Evidence-Based Practice has sought innovative strategies to bridge the gaps, establish relationships to address the nursing and community workforce needs, and support the connectiveness between different groups. This presentation will showcase multiple exemplars of creative and innovative approaches which can be utilized to address the challenges confronting health care professionals and communities. It will also investigate the challenges and barriers which could occur when trying to establish community partnerships.

 

Teaching Community Arts Engagement through Arts-Practice Pedagogy (SL15)

Presenters

Christopher J. Smith, Professor and Director, Vernacular Music Center, Texas Tech University

Roger W. Landes, Professor, Vernacular Music Center, Texas Tech University

Abstract

The Texas Tech University Vernacular Music Center (VMC) is a center for research, teaching, and advocacy in the world’s vernacular music and dance. Since its founding in 2000, hundreds of students and thousands of community participants have passed through the VMC orbit: singing, playing, dancing, teaching, attending concerts and master classes.  With a teaching mission that explicitly includes creating young arts professionals, the VMC has developed a grass-roots-based experiential approach to such training, emphasizing that these developing professionals participate in every aspect of the organization. In this presentation, drawing upon the 17-year history of the VMC, Christopher Smith (Founding Director) and Roger Landes (Associate Director), investigate the evolving scope, activities, initiatives, partners, practical strategies, and philosophical frameworks which shape the VMC's mission, and reflect critically upon the ways the VMC experience can inform and enhance related campus-community partnerships across the Humanities and Fine Arts.

 

Solutions by Design: Utilizing A Human-Centered Design for Social Impact Community Projects (RC1)

Presenter

Devon Skerritt, Associate Director, Design and Innovation Programs,

Southern Methodist University

Abstract

Design thinking emerged from product development to become a strategy embraced by startups and corporations, and now higher education. Yet little is understood about how this methodology is applied in higher education, especially within community engagement projects. The Master of Arts in Design and Innovation (MADI) at Southern Methodist University (SMU) allows students from diverse disciplinary backgrounds to learn human-centered design thinking and apply their training to social impact projects in Dallas, Texas. Two innovative case studies at SMU suggest a framework for building reciprocal university-community collaborations incorporating design thinking. Aligned with civic engagement values, design challenges create democratically engaged citizens through a unique model of community-engaged teaching, research, and service.  Discussion topics include the stages of human centered design and their alignment with core values of civic engagement; how SMU incorporates HCD through its Master of Arts in Design and Innovation (MADI); and future directions of research and practice of design thinking as a tool for civic engagement through partnerships on social impact community projects.

 

 

 Duncan (119 F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Hance (119 A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Herd (119 B)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Law (119 C)

 

 

2:25 p.m. -3:15 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 1.2

 

Service-Learning in Human Geography (SL13)

Presenter

Gary S. Elbow, Professor, Geography and Honors Studies, Texas Tech University

Esther Moses, Program Director, Hope Community of Shalom

Shivani Dalal, Student, Texas Tech University

Abstract

This session examines the impact of service-learning in an honors human geography course for incoming freshman students at Texas Tech University. Unlike standard human geography classes that focus on world-wide distributions of human artifacts and activities, the honors section of GEOG 2300 is organized around the concept of human well-being. The class looks at a variety of indicators of well-being at different geographic scales; among countries around the world, among states within the United States, and within the State of Texas and the city of Lubbock. The students volunteer at organizations that serve Lubbock's low-income and/or homeless population. The academic objective of the service-learning component of the class is to expose mainly middle-class students to communities of poverty in the hope that they will lose some of their stereotypes about the causes of poverty and gain an appreciation for the plight of the poor.

 

Supporting Writing Instruction in East Lubbock: Leveraging the Learning of Literacy Champions (RC8)

Presenters

Patriann Smith-Tobias, Assistant Professor; Language, Diversity, and Literacy Studies, Texas Tech University

Dawn Burke, Literacy Champion, Texas Tech University

Anita Nigam, Literacy Champion, Texas Tech University

Mellinee Lesley, Associate Dean, Curriculum and Instruction, Texas Tech University

Julie Smit, Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, Texas Tech University 

Lisa Davis, Director of Literacy, Lubbock Independent School District

Beverly Finch, Coordinator Title I College and Career Readiness/AVID, Lubbock Independent School District

Abstract

This session discusses the processes through which faculty, functioning as Literacy Champions, supported the implementation of writing workshops across multiple school sites.  The partners will examine and describe the impact of implementing a writer’s workshop in selected classrooms at four elementary schools, one middle school and one high school, with an emphasis on the ways in which their engagement within these schools facilitated overall literacy improvement.

 

Expanding Access and Meeting Regional Workforce Needs through a 2-Year/4-Year Institutional Partnership

Presenters:

Marina Gonzalez, Instructor, Western Texas College

Andy Swift, Professor and Associate Director, National Wind Institute

Abstract

This session highlights a unique partnership model between the National Wind Institute at Texas Tech University and Western Texas College.  The partnership has resulted in a state-of-the art, industry-based curriculum; strengthened equity and access to educational and economic opportunities for disadvantaged students in rural West Texas; and continues to promote student success via mentoring, industry partnerships, and peer networks.  Although focused on a wind energy education partnership, this session will help attendees recognize the importance of engagement with numerous stakeholders to finding comprehensive solutions to regional economic needs, ways of increasing student access and success, and strategies for building institutional partnerships in light of differing structures, cultures, and bureaucratic red tape. 

 

She’s Healthy and Empowered: Building a University-Community Partnership to promote Women’s Health (RC7)

Presenters

Emily Spence-Almaguer, Associate Professor, Behavioral and Community Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center

Leilani Dodgen, PhD Student, Program Manager for the Better Me Within Program (BMW), University of North Texas Health Science Center

Katherine Cantu Anguiano, Project Coordinator, Community Outreach Core, University of North Texas Health Science Center

Sonia White, Director of Coalitions & Planning, Community Council of Greater Dallas

Abstract

Utilizing approaches that encompass community engagement provides the community with ownership and voices to advocate for their own wellbeing.  This session will provide attendees with an overview of the experience and processes to form a university-community partnership that promotes women’s health and empowerment.  Partners were women in an urban area of Texas from community organizations, churches and a local university. Together, building on work from previous community programs, these partners developed the SHE Tribe model.  The model, mainly built upon a Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach, utilizes components from a variety of evidence-based programs and community expertise to create a program for women that helps them develop their own vision and achieve health at many different life stages.

 

 

 Duncan (119 F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hance (119 A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Herd (119 B)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Law (119 C)

 

 

 

 

 

3:15 p.m. -3:30 p.m.

Afternoon Break

Dean’s Lounge

3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.

Special Workshop:

Service Learning, Student Retention and Success

Presenter:

Andy Furco, Associate Vice President for Public Engagement, Professor, University of Minnesota

Many have asserted that service-learning is a high impact practice that promotes students' academic achievement, educational success, and college persistence and retention. But, is this really the case? This session examines some of the latest research findings on the issue and unpacks service-learning's overall potential for enhancing student success. During the session, participants will have the opportunity to explore some of the different practices within service-learning that influence student outcomes, as well as build an understanding of the relationship between service-learning and students' academic success and retention.

 

Concurrent Sessions 1.3

From Partnerships to Programming: A Critical Reflection on East Lubbock Promise Neighborhood’s Family Academy (SO3)

Presenters

Michael McCarty, Professor, Human Development and Family Studies, Texas Tech University

Stephanie Shine, Instructor and Early Childhood Program Adviser,Human Development and Family Studies, Texas Tech University

Abstract

The East Lubbock Promise Neighborhood (ELPN) is funded by the US Department of Education. The goal is to ensure that children and parents in a low-income neighborhood have access to the resources they need to succeed. This session will present the development and implementation of a service program designed to provide parent and child classes that promote healthy development, well-being, and school readiness to families in a low-income neighborhood. We discuss the benefits and the challenges associated with faculty engagement. Finally, we propose policy and resource allocation recommendations to mitigate these challenges.

 

From Silos to Synergy: Building a University-Community Coalition to Improve Mental Health (CP7)

Presenters

Emily Merrill, Associate Dean/Department Chair, TTUHSC School of Nursing

Rafael Ruiz, Director of Psychiatry, Montford Psychiatric Unit,TTUHSC

Michael Gomez, Associate Professor, Psychologist, and Director, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Center for Superheroes Pediatrics, TTUHSC School of Medicine

Susan Calloway, Associate Professor and Program Director, TTUHSC School of Nursing

Chrystal Jansz Rieken, Clinical Psychologist in Private Practice, Lubbock

Abstract

This panel presentation will cover the development of an interdisciplinary coalition comprised of TTU/TTUHSC and community stakeholders for the purpose of advancing mental health service delivery, research, education and access. The activities undertaken within the year since the coalition was established along with current and future initiatives will be reviewed. Lessons learned, barriers and facilitators will be identified. The perspectives of internal and community stakeholders will be presented.

Plains/Alexander (119 D/E)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hance (119 A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Herd (119 B)

4:25 p.m.- 5:15 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 1.4

 

Community Health Center of Lubbock, Inc. (CP4)

Presenter

Michael Sullivan, CEO, Community Health Center, Lubbock

Abstract

Community Health Center of Lubbock, Inc.’s (CHCL) mission is to provide quality and preventive health care services to those in need. Since its inception, CHCL has been engaged with TTU and TTUHSC. The common thread for this relationship stands on the basis of educational opportunities and service learning projects that have enabled CHCL to grow its agency, create innovation, and provide educational opportunities for many students. The collaborations have been with the Colleges of Engineering, Media & Communication, Business, Public Administration, Schools of Medicine and Nursing, Departments of Ophthalmology, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, and Psychiatry. They have provided students with real life experiences and access to expertise and resources, and opened up research opportunities for TTU and TTUHSC with CHCL as a community agency.  Through the partnership, CHCL has been able to expand its healthcare with eye care and extend its hours of care by participating in the East Lubbock Promise Neighborhood (ELPN) grant through the Department of Education.

 

The Salience of Reverse Planning Principles to Community Engagement Activities with Students (SL16)

Presenter

Jacki Fitzpatrick, Associate Professor, Human Development & Family Studies, Texas Tech University

Abstract

This presentation will focus on the use of Reverse Planning Principles (RPPs) in the development of community engagement activities (for students). RPP’s have been used previously to (a) deconstruct successful activities [e.g., products, processes, concepts] and/or (b) identify the endpoints for future activities (e.g., Burd & Munro, 2000; Choquet & Corbire, 2006). After the endpoints have been identified, instructors can identify the relevant parameters of community engagement activities (e.g., timeline, allocation of resources/materials, prerequisite student knowledge/skills, coordination with community partners {agencies, corporations}, assessments]. This presentation will be based on extant literature plus the author’s multi-year experience in conducting a service-learning assignment in an undergraduate course. Although the assignment was conducted in a social science course, the presentation will not be limited to a social science context.

 

Research, Collaboration, and Action: Intersections within a STEM Degree Accelerator Grant (RC6)

Presenters

Patricia M. Ryan, Research Assistant & PhD Student, Higher Education Research, Texas Tech University

Valerie O. Paton, Professor, Education Psychology & Leadership - Higher Education Research, Texas Tech University

Stephanie D. Ducheneaux, Dean of Instructional Affairs, Western Texas College

Abstract

Grant partners from six community colleges, one secondary school, and one university and a team of graduate student researchers from Texas Tech University, collaborated to conduct a research study in support of the West Texas Regional STEM Degree Accelerator grant. This session will briefly present the findings from the research study including the barriers to success for developmental math students and strategies to promote success.  Members of the research team and grant partners will then discuss how the findings were used to facilitate roundtable dialogs on the impacts for individual campuses, and for the development of the second phase of the collaborative research project.  The panelists will further identify challenges and opportunities of embedding engaged research into a graduate course from the student, instructor, and partner levels.  Lastly, they will discuss how research teams and partners can work together to co-construct studies that advance knowledge while providing opportunities for more immediate impact locally.

 

 

 Hance (119 A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Herd (119 B)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Law (119 C)

 

 

 

6:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m.

Welcome Reception at the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts

http://www.lhuca.org/

https://eventective-media.azureedge.net/425771.jpg

Off-Site

511 Ave. K, Lubbock

8:00 p.m.

 

Day 1 Concludes

 

 

Day 2- February 22, 2017

Time

Content

Location

7:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Registration/Check-In

Alumni Lounge

7:30 a.m. - 8:15 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Dean’s Lounge & Alexander/Plains (119 D/E)

8:15 a.m. - 9:05 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions 2.1

 

Nutrition Education and Food Environment Programs in the East Lubbock Promise Neighborhood (ELPN) (RC5)

Presenters

Oak-Hee Park, Senior Research Associate, Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Texas Tech University

Rachel Brown, Undergraduate Research Assistant, Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Texas Tech University

Sranee Medina, Undergraduate Research, Texas Tech University

Charity Chin, Undergraduate Research, Texas Tech University

Abstract

The ELPN program has been funded by the U.S. Department of Education since 2013, and the goal of its nutrition programs has been not only to deliver hands-on nutrition education in the ELPN community, but also to promote community residents’ health by increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption. LCET, a community-based nutrition education program, and the Food Environment Study were established to achieve these goals, and they have been successfully conducted for over 3 years. Outcomes of the LCET program indicate that a community-based family cooking program is significantly effective for increasing participants’ nutrition knowledge. Outcomes of the Food Environment Study show that the ELPN community is a food desert, indicating that ELPN residents require farther travel to access healthy food outlets but have less accessible public transportation. Trust issues and building community relationships are the most important considerations for the program’s success.

 

Engagement as a Means to Teacher Recruitment and Retention in Rural Areas (CP6)

Presenters

Nora Shirley-Griffin, Professor of Special Education and Director of the Virginia Murray Sowell Center, Texas Tech University

Rona L. Pogrund,  Professor and Coordinator of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairment Program, Texas Tech University

Abstract

Teacher retention is a constant problem, especially in rural communities, leading rural school districts oftentimes to hire personnel who are non-certified or not highly-qualified.  This, in turn, may lead to inadequate education of students with disabilities and reduced student achievement. Project SASI - Students with Autism and Sensory Impairments: Addressing the Personnel Shortages of Rural, Remote, and High-Need Areas created a culture of engagement to prepare teachers of students with visual impairments, orientation and mobility specialists, and teachers of students with deaf blindness with an expertise in teaching children with autism.  This culture was created by preparing scholars who resided in the rural areas, providing transactional coursework, and developing professional networks.  Learn about the different ways Project SASI engaged local communities and professional networks to recruit and prepare professionals to teach children with sensory disabilities, understand the relationship between an Engaged Scholarship Model (by Franz), which is based on “leverage points,” and Project SASI, and how the project will be sustained over time.

 

S.T.A.R. -Students Together Achieving Revitalization (SL14)

Presenter

Sue Ann Pemberton, Assistant Professor in Practice, University of Texas at San Antonio

Abstract

S.T.A.R. is a community engagement project that involves students in hands-on learning while providing community service to houses within historic districts. Students work with and learn from contractor house leaders to perform minor house repairs, scraping, and prep for painting. They learn safety, how to use tools, project planning and making repairs. Students are exposed to inner-city, historic neighborhood planning, development and details. They often take ownership in their project and return on another weekend to finish what was not accomplished. Home owners often engage with the students, teaching them about the neighborhood, their house and its history. S.T.A.R. is a collaboration with The City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation and involves students of all academic levels and multiple disciplines. It has introduced over 800 students to inner city neighborhoods and preservation, who take ownership of a project and work to see it to completion while learning respect for each other and for community members with previously unknown needs.

 

Field Stations as Ambassadors and Agents for Bridging Silos: Engagement in Watershed Protection and Research (SO1)

Presenters

Tom Arsuffi, Director, Llano River Field Station, Texas Tech University

Tyson Broad, Watershed Coordinator, Llano River Field Station, Texas Tech University

Abstract

Field Stations are a crucial nexus for addressing natural resource and environmental education among diverse societal communities. Building authentic relationships with communities is critical to the Texas Tech Llano River Field Station (LRFS) in conducting research and proving education that promotes resilience of natural systems in the Hill Country. LRFS engages in a comprehensive spectrum of collaborations focused on finding solutions to regional problems.  We partner with 14 state/federal agencies, 65 school districts, 8 scientific/educational organizations, and funding agencies, NGOs, municipalities, and landowners who share expertise, resources and decision-making.  The presenters will discuss the range of their initiatives and partnerships and share strategies for boundary spanning, networking, integration of research findings into public engagement, education and broader impacts, and K-12 STEM natural resource pedagogy.

 

 

Duncan (119 F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hance (119 A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herd (119 B)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Law (119 C)

 

 

9:10 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions 2.2

 

Empowerment Evaluation and Service Learning: A Win-Win for Communities and Students (SL8)

Presenters

Emily Spence-Almaguer, Associate Professor, Behavioral and Community Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center

Shleshma Chettri, PhD Student, University of North Texas Health Science Center

Abstract

Empowerment evaluation (Fetterman & Wandersman, 2004) is a collaborative approach that is intended to build the capacity of community stakeholders to plan, implement and evaluate their own programs (p. 27). Service learning includes community service activities associated with course objectives that are interspersed throughout a semester with opportunities for reflection. Service learning has been used in a graduate program evaluation course to help community stakeholders enhance their internal evaluation activities and engage in continuous improvement. The ten principles of empowerment evaluation guide the service learning projects and include key constructs such as community ownership, social justice, and organizational learning. The structure and expectations of the service learning-empowerment evaluation projects have evolved over the course of 3 years to promote improved learning experiences and community service outcomes during 16-week semesters.

 

Beyond Service: Creating Meaningful Engagement with the Military (SO2)

Presenters

Hyojung Cho, Associate Professor of Heritage Management, Museum of Texas Tech University

Nicky Ladkin, Assistant Director for Academic Engagement,Museum of Texas Tech University

Andrew Scott DeJesse, Cultural Heritage Preservation Officer, US Army Civil Affairs; Graduate Student, Museum Science Program, Texas Tech University

Abstract

The Museum of Texas Tech University has a unique mission as it balances diverse responsibilities as a general museum with collections that also teaches a graduate program in Museum Science. As a museum, it has great commitment to public outreach and community engagement through its exhibitions, research, and education programs. The graduate program stresses such commitment throughout the curriculum, as students must become professionals who understand the importance of working with communities.  In this regard, we have realized that the military community, both active military and veterans, and their families, have been under-recognized in community engagement. The purpose of this presentation is to recognize the military community, and share our experiences in engaging the military community. The development of a cultural affairs training program for US Army Reserves Civil Affairs and preparation of a traveling exhibit honoring Texans killed or missing in action in the Vietnam War will be showcased for discussion. More importantly, we will examine the implications of community service versus community engagement, partner roles, and benefits.

 

The East Side Arts Camp: Designing, Framing, and Sustaining a Summer Camp for Elementary Students (SO4)

Presenters

Jared Strange, East Lubbock Promise Neighborhood Arts Coordinator, Texas Tech University

Caroline Davis, MFA Student, School of Theatre and Dance, Texas Tech University

Meg Davis, Doctoral Student, School of Theatre and Dance, Texas Tech University

Abstract

The East Side Arts Camp (ESAC) is an East Lubbock Promise Neighborhood (ELPN)-funded program that was established in 2015 to serve elementary school students in the Estacado Feeder Pattern.  In addition to taking classes in art, music, theatre, and dance, students also undertake a neighborhood art project in East Lubbock and present their work as part of the First Friday Art Trail.  This session will outline the ESAC story, starting with its initial conception and concluding with the most current plans for the 2017 edition, and use that narrative as a springboard for exploring the logistical issues of putting the camp together, the importance of framing the camp as an opportunity for both artistic development and community building, and the challenges that must be met in order to sustain the program as ELPN funding dissipates.  The findings may prove beneficial to other universities and university entities seeking to establish specialized programming for minors.

 

East Lubbock Promise College & Career Readiness: Engagement through Service (CP2)

Presenters

Janie L. Ramirez,Outreach Programs Director, College of Education, Texas Tech University

Esmeralda Benitez, Executive Director, LEARN Inc.

Nichole L. Gonzalez, College Advisor/Coordinator Gear Up, Estacado High School, Lubbock

Beverly Finch, AVID, Lubbock Independent School District

Chris Moore, Adult Education, Lubbock Independent School District

Stacy Watson, College and Career Readiness, Lubbock Independent School District

T. Huey Hobby, Parent

Abstract

A true collaboration of six partners serving the East Lubbock community and schools since 2013 has proven challenging but rewarding. Partners include South Plains Closing the Gaps P-20 Council Generation Texas Statewide Campaign, LEARN Educational Talent Search, Lubbock ISD, GEAR UP, TTU Office of Community Engagement, and TTU College of Education Outreach Office. The partnership has learned the importance of successful collaborations through engagement and consistency. This presentation will address the reasons for engagement with the community, the partners’ ways of engaging, strategies for building and sustaining the partnership, and changes that have resulted from engagement with a large variety of community constituencies not only within the public school system but in neighborhoods and community centers.

 

 

 

Duncan (119 F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hance (119 A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herd (119 B)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Law (119 C)

 

 

10:00 a.m. -10:15 a.m.

Morning Break

Dean’s Lounge

10:15 a.m. -11:05 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions 2.3

 

On Course: Active Engagement for Community Change & Experiential Learning (SL3)

Presenter

Leslie J. Casey, Senior Director, Community & Alumni Relations, University of North Texas, Health Science Center

Abstract

For 40 years, UNTHSC has been a driving partner behind a road race – a race that is the largest multi-event in Texas and plays on a national level with Boston, LA, and New York as a hallmark in quality, safety, and operations. The mission behind the race and UNTHSC's involvement is the epidemic of inactivity and poor nutrition and the resulting increase in overweight and obese families. UNTHSC's engagement in the marathon extends from board participation to on-site medical coordination. We have a unique approach to involving students in delivery of mass-event care and athlete therapies as well as fostering volunteerism, pediatric interaction, and prevention. This presentation will explore how activated sponsorship of community events can tie service-learning and community problem solving into a brand marketing campaign with unique success.  Learn tangible ways of becoming a supportive community partner with mission-aligned organizations; recognize sponsorship opportunities to allow academic and socially responsible results to elevate your anchor institution’s brand; understand experiential and cause marketing tactics and their place in academic engagement; and recognize elements of collective impact and the university’s role in fostering local culture.

 

Lessons Learned at Estacado Early College High School (CP9)

Presenters

Robin H. Lock, Vice Dean, College of Education, Texas Tech University

Levi Johnson, Research Associate, College of Education, Texas Tech University

Tanna Rodriguez, Lubbock Independent School District

Abstract

Founded in 2016, the Estacado Early College High School is an ambitious joint endeavor between Texas Tech University and Lubbock Independent School District. This is the University's first large-scale foray into dual credit academic offerings. The formation of this new educational entity has offered opportunities for community engagement and unique partnership forging an unparalleled campus-community relationship. Our session will highlight key lessons learned from the planning and initial implementation stages of this project's development.

 

Engaging the Emerging Texas Wine Industry to Enhance Rural Development (SO5)

Presenter

Edward Hellman, Professor of Viticulture, Texas Tech University

Abstract

The Texas wine industry has grown from 46 wineries to more than 400 over the past 15 years. Increasing interest in locally produced food and wine has created new economic opportunities for rural areas that often struggle to retain local businesses.  Rural wineries with appealing vineyard views and tasting rooms draw in visitors that purchase wine, related products and services that stimulate the local economy, yet technical challenges to successful grape and wine production are numerous.  The majority of wine industry entrepreneurs are second-career professionals with little or no experience in grape and wine production, and the effective educational engagement of the Texas wine industry community is challenged by the technical knowledge and skills needed and the geographic dispersion of students.  This session will focus on how Texas Tech established the Viticulture Certificate program in 2007 to provide wine industry entrepreneurs with the education training needed to establish and manage a commercial vineyard.  Responding to an emerging need for educational programs, a Winemaking Certificate Program was added in 2014.  Session attendees will learn about the structure and format of the Certificate programs which utilize blended delivery of courses to meet the needs of nontraditional students. 

 

Community Informatics in STEM Education (CP5)

Presenters

Angela M Slates, Adjunct Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, Texas Tech University

Abstract

Community Informatics (CI) in STEM Education is an interdisciplinary model that combines the theory and practice of community informatics toward addressing STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education imperatives. At a maximum level of effectiveness, community informatics bridges resources to build sustainable technological networks by providing access to tools and training; improved device and broadband interaction; personal and community development; intergenerational information exchange; cross cultural exchange; community preservation; cyber-participation and economic opportunity toward increased access, opportunity, and interest in STEM for historically underrepresented groups (i.e. African American, Latino and low income).  This session will provide attendees with an overview of community informatics theory and practice and its efficacy in STEM education practice.  It will also include methods and examples from projects originating out of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois.  University/community partnerships with a particular focus on partnerships for departments of curriculum and instruction will be discussed. 

 

 

Duncan (119 F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hance (119 A)                                          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herd (119 B)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Law (119 C)

 

 

11:10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Concurrent Session 2.4

 

Personal and Professional Value of International Engagement: A Case Study Involving Texas Tech and China (CP12)

Presenters

Janice. N. Killian, Professor, School of Music, Texas Tech University

Vallie S Owens, PhD Candidate, Texas Tech University

Branco Sekalegga, PhD Candidate, Texas Tech University

Abstract

In 2013, Dr. Janice Killian (chair of Music Education) received an invitation to be keynote speaker at a music education conference in Kampala, Uganda, in what turned out to be a trip much beyond a simple conference. Vallie Owens (current PhD candidate) and two other doctoral students accompanied her on a life changing experience. There they met Branco Sekalegga (founder and director of Bitone Children's Center in Kampala and later, a PhD student at Texas Tech). In 2015, Killian, Owens and 5 other current or former PhD students in Music Education were invited to spend two weeks with music students in Chengdu, China, at the Southwestern University for Nationalities. Killian, Owens and Sekalegga will discuss these international adventures, show videos of the experiences, and consider the personal and professional understandings to be gained from such engaged international experiences.

 

Mentoring Community Outreach in the Arts (SL12)

Presenter

Evangeline Jimenez, Assistant Professor of Theatre, Texas Tech University

Abstract

This presentation will focus on the experiences of students enrolled in the Texas Tech University School of Theatre and Dance course entitled “Mentoring Community Outreach in the Arts.”  It will examine ways of structurally building and teaching a course designed to engage students with the community, the nature of community outreach vs. community engagement, pedagogical techniques utilized, and the challenges and benefits to community outreach and engagement. The session will incorporate a PowerPoint presentation and active discussion addressing the process of creating community collaborations in one’s practice, and the challenges and benefits of creating new initiatives involving community.

 

Engagement Impacts: Defining and Communicating Mutual and Sustainable Benefits (RC2)

Presenters

Mhd Hasan Almekdash, PHD Student, Texas Tech University

Valerie Paton, Professor, College of Education, Texas Tech University

Abstract

This session will discuss the results from a research study that examined the impacts from higher education institutions’ outreach and engagement initiatives on the local and global levels. The study pinpointed that impacts have been deeply rooted in public land grant universities’ missions since they were founded. Through identifying two models from the literature, Simon (2009) and Weerts (2011) as theoretical framework, the study investigated how impacts should be defined, measured and evaluated, and practiced in order for institutions of higher education, in general, and public land grant universities, in particular, to help communities achieve the desired changes and solve the complicated problems of the 21st century.  The presenters will provide attendees with various metrics of impacts that were identified and explain how these are measured in different arenas of institutional engagement and outreach.  They will further discuss local and global initiatives that are exemplary in achieving impacts.

 

 

 

Duncan (119 F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hance (119 A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Law (119 C)

 

 

12:00-1:00 p.m.

Luncheon

Plains/Alexander (119 D/E)

1:10-2:00 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 2.5

 

Servant Leadership, Intellectual Humility, and the Human Side of University-Community Partnerships (CP11)

Presenter

Rene Saldana, Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, Texas Tech University

Ana B Torres, Instructor, Teacher Education Program, Texas Tech University

Abstract

This presentation tells the story of a local school and its partnership with two Texas Tech faculty members to demonstrate how it can serve as a model based on the concepts of Servant Leadership and Intellectual Humility. The presenters contend that the driving force of these university-community relationships should not be what faculty members can gain from the community partners in terms of research or service credits for promotion and tenure. Rather, faculty members have much to gain by putting aside their own interests to serve where they are needed, humble themselves to learn from others, and become someone whom schools and community institutions welcome into their spaces. While this practice seems counterproductive for faculty members who are under the pressure of achieving tenure, and thus having to rely on these partnerships to complete research and service, forging the relationships must be done in a genuinely humble, servant-centered way.

 

UrbanTech: Envisioning Sustainable Environments with Community Partners (CP14)

Presenters

David A. Driskill, Associate Professor and Director of UrbanTech, Texas Tech University

Dan Chamberlain, Architect with FBT Architects, Lubbock/Albuquerque

Dela Esqueda, Executive Director, Guadalupe-Parkway Sommerville Centers

Abstract

UrbanTech is an engagement studio within the College of Architecture. Inspired by the Boyer- Mitgang Report Building Community: A New Future for Architecture Education and Practice (1996, The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching), UrbanTech’s goal is to establish a climate of engagement, clarify the public benefits of architecture, promote the creation of new knowledge and serve as a laboratory for ethical professional behavior where community needs supersede private agendas. This session will present a methodology for how UrbanTech created, sustained, and publicized a campus-community partnership that addressed concerns from several community stakeholders.  It will specifically describe the collaboration between UrbanTech, Parkway Sommerville Center and private consultants. Parkway Sommerville Center established in 1970, has served children and their families providing literacy training, language skills, family living training and support. Key participants in the collaboration will discuss the process from documentation of existing conditions to envisioning future infrastructure and launching the project into the community.

 

YouthMappers: Globally Engaged Service-Learning Innovations (SL2)

Presenter

Patricia Solis, Research Associate Professor, Geography Co-Director, Center for Geospatial Technology, Texas Tech University

Abstract

Join this hands-on session to learn about YouthMappers – a global community of university students and their faculty advisors in developing nations and the US engaged in addressing locally defined development challenges.  Student-led chapters work collaboratively across countries to create new, quality, localized geospatial data in unmapped places of the world where USAID works to end extreme poverty. The network has grown rapidly to currently 48 university partners in 16 countries contributing over 3 million map changes to OpenStreetMap.  YouthMappers also promotes adoption of these technologies and project-based pedagogies into courses, curriculum and service-learning opportunities, and encourages research and analysis that utilizes this open spatial data and platform.  Student engagement supports university efforts to offer meaningful global learning experiences, build a socially engaged citizenry, enhance long-term scientific capacity around the world, and foster youth exchange and leadership.  Session attendees will gain experience in mapping for a real project.

 

From “I Can't” to “I Can”: Academic Service Learning in the Integrated Reading and Writing Classroom (SL11)

Presenters

Bonnie Cordell, Assistant Director, Texas Success Initiative (TS) Texas Tech University

Osariemen Osaghae, Instructor, Texas Success Initiative, Texas Tech University

Abstract

The Texas Success Initiative is a Developmental Education Program at Texas Tech University providing customized support for students in order to help them become college ready in the core areas of reading, writing, and math. The TSI Integrated Reading and Writing program recently implemented an Academic Service Learning component beginning in Summer 2016. This presentation will include a brief explanation of the TSI and Literacy Lubbock Service Learning partnership, a concise review of Academic Service Learning research, an overview of the teaching methodology utilized in the TSI IRW classroom, preliminary results of the program, as well as implications and discussion.

 

 

 

Duncan (119 F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hance (119 A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herd (119 B)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Law (119 C)

2:05-3:00 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 2.6

 

Community Engagement That Doesn't Lead to Divorce: The Do’s and Don’ts of Effective Partnerships (ELPN) (CP3)

Presenters

Sherida K Hibbard, Operations Coordinator of ELPN, Texas Tech University

Doyle Vogler, Associate Superintendent for Secondary Schools, Lubbock ISD

Abstract

As community engagement by institutions of higher education becomes more prevalent, one would think that the systems and processes for strategically engaging faculty, staff, students, and community partners would become streamlined and routine. However, because those being served are unique individuals, there is no one-size-fits-all method to effective implementation of community service programs. The larger the program size and more lofty the goals, the more creative the solutions must become. While there are no hard and fast solutions to guarantee successful community engagement and scholarship, there are tools, tips, and techniques that make the journey less challenging.

 

2+1 TechTeach Across Texas Teacher Preparation Program: A Model of Community Engagement (CP13)

Presenter

Zinab Munoz, Institutional Partnership Liaison, College of Education, Texas Tech University           

Abstract

The 2+1 TechTeach teacher preparation model through Texas Tech University is a rigorous, clinically intensive, fast-track program. Texas Tech partners with 12 school districts across the state of Texas to develop pipelines of high-quality, effective educators in their communities. Teacher candidates with a completed Associates of Arts in Teaching degree are recruited from the local community colleges. Discover the model’s successes and challenges and how this engagement is mutually beneficial for all partners: TTU, the community colleges and the school districts- as they synergize to meet their communities' educational needs.

 

Artistically Engaging the Hispanic Voice (RC3)

Presenter

Evangeline Jimenez, Assistant Professor of Theatre, Texas Tech University

Abstract

This presentation will examine the impact of two artistic ventures that were created with and performed by local community members and university students to educate about and give voice to perceptions of Hispanic identity, culture and history - Nunca Olvidar, an original play, and La Vida de Algodn: The Life of Cotton, an interdisciplinary art exhibit. The forum will incorporate a PowerPoint presentation and active discussion of community engagement through art and storytelling utilized to address art as a form of social justice, art as a conduit for education and learning, art accessibility and engaging new audiences (especially members of minority groups), art as a conduit for healing and building a sense of validity, "high art vs. community art (stigmas, challenges, goals, function), and new ideas for utilizing art as a bridge to engage the community.

 

 

Duncan (119 F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hance (119 A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Herd (119 B)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3:00 p.m.

Conference Concludes

 

 

Contact

Outreach and Engagement