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Rubrics for Online Discussion

Using a Rubric to Grade Discussions

Setting up a rubric in Blackboard can help to make grading easier and to allow students to be clear about your expectations. There are many examples of online discussion or participation rubrics, but a simple format (scored 0-4 in this case) could look something like this:

0 – No reasonable attempt made (note: this includes minimal responses such as “yes, I agree,” “I thought the same thing,” etc.) and/or disrespectful content posted.

1 – Lacks critical engagement with assigned materials and/or significantly short of minimum length.

2 – Responses provide simplistic discussion, lack grounding in the assigned materials, and/or fall short of minimum length. (Or as per 3 or 4 below, but only one response posted.)

3 – At least two responses made which engage with your classmates' posts and the assigned materials in a clear and appropriate manner; meets minimum length.

4 – At least two responses made which engage with your classmates' posts and the assigned materials in a complex and nuanced manner; meets or exceeds the minimum length.

Additional Resources and Ideas for Rubrics:

Sample Discussion Rubric from Nikki Schutte at the College of St. Scholastica

Sample Discussion Rubric from Justin Harbin at Lancaster Bible College | Capital Seminary & Graduate School

Sample Discussion Rubric from Clair Lamonica at Illinois State University

Teaching, Learning, & Professional Development Center