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Women's History Month Events 2009

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  • ghost 2 "Ghost 2" (2008) by Lahib Jaddo

    Stepping Out - The Arab American Faculty Forum and the Women's Studies Program are co-sponsoring a panel discussion with guest Lahib Jaddo, Assistant Professor, Architecture, Kanika Batra, Assistant Professor, English and Susan Fortney, Paul Whitfield Horn Professor of Law.

  • lunafest

    Lunafest
    - The Women’s Studies Program proudly sponsored Lunafest a national traveling festival of short films by, for, and about women. This was a one night only event at the Louise H. Underwood Center for the Arts. General admission seating is $10 for the general public and $7 for students. 100 percent of proceeds was donated to charity: 15 percent to the Breast Cancer Fund, and the remaining 85 percent of proceeds go directly back to community organizations.

    Lunafest ran from October – March. In that time it was shown by more than 100 venues nationwide and was seen by over 20,000 viewers. Lunafest film’s have won industry awards and audience accolades, and the films selected for 2007-08 Lunafest shared this brilliance. From quirky animation to touching documentaries, the 9 selected films were incredibly diverse in both style and subject matter, united by a common thread of exceptional storytelling by...for...about women.

    The screening coincided with the Louise H. Underwood Center for the Arts’ Thursday Night Arts programming. The Louise H. Underwood Center for the Arts is located at 511 Ave. K, Lubbock, TX, (806) 762-8606.

    Lunafest and its board of advisers receive approximately 600 films annually from women filmmakers around the world.

    That board includes filmmakers and industry professionals, all looking for exceptional storytelling, creative delivery and powerful messages.

    Out of almost 600 films, ten were chosen for 2009 Lunafest.


    "Big Girl," 14 minutes, directed by Renuka Jeyapalan. This Canadian filmmaker has made two other award-winning shorts and "Big Girl," about a 9-year-old competing with mom's boyfriend for attention, has won awards at festivals in Toronto, Berlin and Houston.

    • "Fim-de-Semana (weekend)," seven minutes, directed by Claudia Varejao. The first short film from a Portugese filmmaker who also directed the documentary "Wanting."

    • "Sarah in the Dark," 11 minutes, directed by Jennifer Halley. Synopsis: "The little voice in Sarah's head has been let loose for too long." The directorial debut by the Canadian actress who plays Seelix on "Battlestar Galactica."

    • "Red Wednesday," 11 minutes, directed by Nazanin Shirazi. A finalist at the USA National Film Festival.

    • "Grappling Girls," 13 minutes, directed by Lisa Blackstone. A Minneapolis native filming women who wrestle.

    • "34x25x36," seven minutes, directed by Jesse Erica Epstein. This Boston native's "The Guarantee" was named best short film at the Newport International Film Festival.

    • "Kaden," eight minutes, directed by Harriet Storm. A San Francisco State University MFA in filmmaking student focuses on the feelings of a transgender individual.

    • "My First Crush," animated, almost four minutes, directed by Julia Pott. This British director has made a playful, animated film about awkward moments and first romance; this was her graduating film at Kingston University.

    • "The Ladies," 13 minutes, directed by Christina Alexandra Voros. Synopsis: "Sisters Vali and Mimi reflect on their craft, the importance of family and their creative spirits." Voros, raised in Massachusetts, is the only member of her own family not born in Hungary.

    • "Kuna Ni Nanang (My Mother Said)," five minutes, directed by Jessica Sison. The documentary directorial debut by an Asian-American filmmaker already has won awards at four film festivals in California, Oklahoma and Oregon.

    Feel free to visit www.lunafest.org <http://www.lunafest.org/> or contact Chris Caddel to find out more information about Lunafest.


women's history

"When I started working on women's history about thirty years ago, the field did not exist. People didn't think that women had a history worth knowing. - Gerda Lerner, Women and History (1986:1993)

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