Texas Tech University

Art History Course Offerings

Spring 2022
Art History Course Schedule & Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Survey Courses - Spring 2022

ARTH 1301 Art History Survey I
Sec. 001: MWF 1:00-1:50   ARCH 01   Ms Jay
Sec. 002: TR 9:30-10:50   ART B01   Dr Scherff
Sec. D1: MW 1:00-2:20   ART B01   Dr Elliott

ARTH 2302 Art History Survey II 
Sec. 001: MWF 10:00-10:50   ARCH 01   Dr Scherff
Sec. 002: MWF 12:00-12:50   ARCH 01   Dr Scherff
Sec. 003: TR 12:30-1:50   ART B01   Dr Chua

ARTH 3303 Art History Survey III (writing intensive)
Sec. 001: TR 12:30-1:50   ARCH 01   Dr Orfila
Sec. 002: TR 3:30-4:50   ARCH 01   Dr Orfila

Survey descriptions are available in the Texas Tech University 2020-2021 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog.

Undergraduate Upper-level Courses - Spring 2022

ARTH 3320 Medieval Art of Europe
MW 3:00-4:20 ARCH 01
Instructor: Dr Elliott
Topic: Art, Pilgrimage, and the Cult of Saints and Relics in the Middle Ages
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

In the Middle Ages, the bodies of the Christian saints and martyrs were believed to hold the power to heal and to absolve sins. People endured arduous pilgrimages believing that proximity to the sacred relics of the saints would benefit them in this life and the next. Pilgrimage was a dominant metaphor for the liminality of human existence. Life was considered a brief journey, both physical and metaphysical, towards an eternal afterlife. The market for relics to sustain the pilgrimage enterprise generated the imaginative use of the bodies, whole or fragmented, of holy men and women.  This course will investigate the culture, geography, and the social and architectural infrastructure of pilgrimage and the cult of saint and relics throughout the Middle Ages, c. 300-1400 CE. Students will study the tombs, the statues, the churches, the reliquaries, and other evidence of the material culture of pilgrimage sites across Europe. Students will also have the opportunity to handle medieval manuscripts in facsimile at the Southwest Collection. This is a writing intensive course. Students with writing difficulties are urged to contact the Writing Centers of Texas Tech

ARTH 3388 Contemporary Animation and Modern Art
TR 9:30-10:50 
Instructor: Dr Orfila
Suggested prerequisite: ARTH 3303 or consent of instructor

The course studies the history and intersections of modern and contemporary art and cinematic and computer animation throughout the 20th and 21st centuries in a synchronic manner, and explores the categories and critical concepts used for the interpretation and study of artworks and animated films.  Through the analysis of case studies, students will gain a better understanding of the relationship between animation and the fine arts at specific historical moments, as well as a better comprehension of the artworks under consideration. The course will provide an introduction to the techniques, styles, and main interpretative paradigms used for the study of the visual arts and animation.

Animation will be presented as an inherently cross-disciplinary practice and field of studies at the intersection of the visual arts and music and theater/performance, as well as of popular culture and high art. The course, hence, is an introduction to interdisciplinarity in the arts. The history of animation—from its pre-cinematic manifestations as optical toys, color organs, fireworks spectacles, to its development as a cinematic practice and as a post-filmic technique—reflects the major technological breakthroughs of the last two centuries. The focus on animation will allow students to explore the relationship between art and technology. Valid for the certificate in Animation Studies. This is a writing intensive course. Students with writing difficulties are urged to contact the Writing Centers of Texas Tech.

ARTH 4340 Art of the Renaissance
TR 11:00-12:20 ARCH 01
Instructor: Dr Scherff
Topic: Gender Roles, Power, and Society in Renaissance Europe
Prerequisite: ARTH 2302 or consent of instructor

This course examines Renaissance European history (1300-1580) through the lens of gender and through social and power dynamics. We will explore gender and sexuality as social constructs, and investigate the ways these ideas are reflected in and created by works of art. This course will address individual and group experiences of varying ages, estates, religions, cultures, political influence, professions, identities, and sexualities. The course will focus on three primary themes: 1) structures and power relations in early modern Europe; 2) how early modern women negotiated these structures; and 3) how early modern notions of gender shaped power relations and impacted identity and agency. This is a writing intensive course. Students with writing difficulties are urged to contact the Writing Centers of Texas Tech.

Graduate Courses - Spring 2022

ARTH 5309 Theories of Contemporary Art
R 3:00-5:50 ARCH 201
Instructor: Dr Toteva
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

Advanced survey of contemporary art theory and critical methods, with emphasis on the impact of the post-structuralist critique of representation.

ARTH 5363 18th & 19th Century Art
T 3:00-5:50 ARCH 201
Instructor: Dr Chua
Topic: The Multiple 19th Century
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

PREVIOUS SEMESTERS

Fall 2021
Art History Course Schedule & Course Descriptions

Note: as of 3/13/21, we anticipate that Fall classes will be taught face-to-face.

Undergraduate Survey Courses - Fall 2021

ARTH 1301 Art History Survey I
Sec. 001: MWF 10:00-10:50    ART B01    Ms Jay
Sec. 002: MWF 1:00-1:50    ART B01    Dr. Scherff
Sec. 004: TR 12:30-1:50    ART B01    Dr Elliott
Sec. 005: MWF 11:00-11:50    ARCH 01    Dr Scherff

ARTH 2302 Art History Survey II (satisfies multicultural requirement)
Sec. 001: TR 9:30-10:50    ART B01    Dr Wolff
Sec. 002: TR 12:30-1:50    ARCH 01    Dr Wolff

ARTH 3303 Art History Survey III (writing intensive)
Sec. 002: TR 9:30-10:50    ARCH 01    Dr Orfila

Survey course descriptions are available in the Texas Tech University 2020-2021 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog.

Undergraduate Upper-level Courses - Fall 2021

ARTH 3366.001 18th & 19th Century Art
MW 6:00-7:20 ARCH 01
Instructor: Dr. Chua
Topic: The French Revolution and the Birth of Modernity 1648-1815
Prerequisites: ARTH 1301 and 2302 

The French Revolution of 1789-99 has long been seen to have inaugurated democracy, with its ideals of liberty and human rights. How do we understand the French Revolution both as rupture and continuity, from what happened before? What would it mean to consider the 18th century and French Revolution as involving issues associated with "modernity": economic modernization, demographic transition, and a transformation in the nature of culture, politics, and media? How is culture implicated in these fundamental transformations of self and society during this period? We will look at how events in politics are mediated by cultural form: books, paintings, theatrical dramas, monuments, poetry, pamphlets, prints, ephemera. Some of the main themes we will examine include: (1) The challenge to the absolutist system posed by the public sphere and the Enlightenment; (2) The role of media, especially prints and ephemera; (3) The fragmentation of classicism and the classical body under the pressure of history.

ARTH 4320.001 Seminar: Topics in Medieval Art
TR 3:30-4:50 ART B01
Instructor: Dr Elliott
Topic: Art & Architecture of the Islamic World 7th-16th Centuries
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

This course will begin with introductory readings to provide an overview of Islamic art history, its basis in the religion of Islam and within the Judeo-Christian tradition, and its historical and geographical context from the 7th century on. From there we will move to a discussion of more recent scholarship on issues in Islamic art, such as Eurocentrism and Colonialism. Students will write précis and discuss readings and will develop two short research projects/presentations.

ARTH 4389.001 Topics in 20th and 21st Century Art
TR 12:30-1:50 ENG 301
Instructor: Dr. Orfila
Topic: Art, the Art Market, and Biennials since 1980
Prerequisites: ARTH 3303 or consent of instructor

This course studies global contemporary art since 1980. The course will begin exploring the crisis of modernism and the emergence of Postmodernism. Especial attention will be given to the way globalization and technology have influenced art's creation, promotion and dissemination. Biennials will be given special attention as both the manifestation of Globalization and the promise of decolonization of the art world/market. The course will also explore the insertion (or lack thereof) of new media art within the theoretical and exhibition contexts of the mainstream contemporary art world.

Graduate Courses - Fall 2021

ARTH 5308 Methods & Theories in Art History
M 3:00-5:50 ARCH 201
Instructor: Dr Chua
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

This course will expose students to methodology in art history, through a range of seminal theorists and writers on art, from roughly 1750-2000. We will see how art history has tacked back and forth between the 'macroscopic' formation of long-term structures (eg. Hegel, Riegl), and a more 'micrological' attention to particulars and details (eg. Morelli, Clark). We will ask of the historicity of these theories: how these writers came to their approaches in and as a product of their own historical moments. What were a particular art historian's assumptions, for instance, about "past" and "present," "historical" and "contemporary," "art" and "non-art"? We will look at how the art-historical tradition constructs itself – Riegl returning to Hegel, Panofsky misreading Warburg, Clark culminating Riegl and Morelli, Summers rethinking Kubler – and ask of the challenge posed by the "New Art History" of the 1970s and 80s (in terms of class, race, and gender) to methods before 1970.

ARTH 5335 Hemispheric Arts of the Americas
W 3:00-5:50 ARCH 201
Instructor: Dr Wolff
Topic: Muralism in the US and Mexico

This graduate seminar examines muralism as a public-facing artform that actively intersects with political discourse. Through muralism, politics are reinvented, synthesized, internalized, nationalized, and globalized. We will discuss muralism through 20th and 21st century murals in Mexico and the US, with a focus on the transnational relationship between the two countries, each of which adopted the artform as a vehicle for national unity during moments of great political upheaval. Course topics include the broadsides of José Guadalupe Posada, Mexican Muralism in Mexico and the US, WPA-sponsored murals in the US, Chicanx murals by artists and collectives such as Judy Baca and ASCO, and the cultural capital of contemporary "street art." This course will be driven by discussions of arts in the public sphere, discourses of nationalism and heritage, and decolonial theory. Students will be expected to read, write, and present critical material on a weekly basis. COVID-permitting, we will also conduct site visits to murals on campus and around the region.

Summer 2021
Art History Course Schedule & Course Descriptions

ARTH 5305 Topics in Art History
First Summer Term: June 2-July 3
MTW 9:00-11:50 Online Zoom
Instructor: Dr Elliott
Topic: Art & Architecture of the Islamic World, 7th-16th Centuries
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

This course will begin with introductory readings to provide an overview of Islamic art history, its basis in the religion of Islam and within the Judeo-Christian tradition, and its historical and geographical context from the 7th century on. From there we will move to a discussion of more recent scholarship on issues in Islamic art, such as Eurocentrism and Colonialism. Students will write précis and discuss readings and will develop two short research projects or presentations.

Spring 2021
Art History Course Schedule & Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Survey Courses - Spring 2021

ARTH 1301 Art History Survey I
Sec. 001: MWF 1:00-1:50   ART B01   Dr Steele
Sec. 002: MWF 3:00-3:50   ARCH 01   Mr Rafei
Sec. 003: TR 12:30-1:50   ART B01   Dr Elliott
Sec. 004: MWF 10:00-10:50   ART B01   Ms Jaye

ARTH 2302 Art History Survey II (satisfies multicultural requirement)
Sec. 001: MWF 10:00-10:50   ARCH 01   Dr Chua
Sec. 002: MWF 12:00-12:50   ARCH 01   Dr Scherff
Sec. 003: TR 9:30-10:50   ART B01   Dr Wolff
Sec. 004: TR 12:30-1:50   ART B01   Dr Wolff

ARTH 3303 Art History Survey III (writing intensive)
Sec. 001: MWF 11:00-11:50   ARCH 01   Ms Weintraub
Sec. 002: TR 9:30-10:50   ARCH 01   Dr Orfila

Survey descriptions are available in the Texas Tech University 2020-2021 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog.

Undergraduate Upper-level Courses - Spring 2021

ARTH 4308 Seminar in Art History
MW 6:00-7:20 ART B01
Instructor: Dr. Chua
Topic: Art and Science 1700-1900
Suggested prerequisite: ARTH 2302 (Survey II). 

This upper-level undergraduate seminar looks into art and science produced in Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries – a period in the wake of the 17th-century "scientific revolution" that saw a transformation in our understanding of humans and animals, and of man's relationship to the natural world – from a spiritualized to a secular nature. We will take an "expanded" approach to the relationship between art and science, and show how science depended on various forms of visualization and imaging. We will focus on several key transitions in these two centuries: the shift away from the humors/passions (and the rethinking of the five senses), the decline of witchcraft and magic, the rise of forms of objectivity, but most importantly, the broad shift from mechanism to vitalism across many fields. We will examine biopolitics, natural history and the rise of ordering practices (Linnaeus, Diderot and d'Alembert's Encyclopédie), animality (Buffon), the earth sciences (Humboldt), thermodynamics, the artfulness or deceptiveness of science, and the visual culture of Darwinian evolution in the late-19th century. If most accounts of science in this broad period have tended to privilege physics and mathematics (eg. the achievements of Newton and Boyle), this course will emphasize developments in the biological or life sciences.

ARTH 4308 Seminar in Art History
TR 12:30-1:50 ENGL/PHIL 151
Instructor: Dr Orfila
Topic: Animation and Modern and Contemporary Art
Suggested prerequisite: ART 3303 (Survey III)

The course studies the history of modern and contemporary art and cinematic and computer animation throughout the 20th and 21st centuries in a synchronic manner and explores the categories and critical concepts used for the interpretation and study of artworks and animated films. The course explores the intersections between modern and contemporary art and animation in the 20th and 21st centuries. Through the analysis of case studies, students will gain a better understanding of the relationship between animation and the fine arts at specific historical moments, as well as a better comprehension of the artworks under consideration. The course will provide an introduction to the techniques, styles, and main interpretative paradigms used for the study of the visual arts and animation. Animation will be presented as an inherently cross-disciplinary practice and field of studies at the intersection of the visual arts and music and theater/performance, as well as of popular culture and high art. The course, hence, is an introduction to interdisciplinarity in the arts. The history of animation—from its pre-cinematic manifestations as optical toys, color organs, fireworks spectacles, to its development as a cinematic practice and as a post-filmic technique—reflects the major technological breakthroughs of the last two centuries. The focus on animation will allow students to explore the relationship between art and technology. This is a writing intensive course. For help, contact the Writing Center.

ARTH 4340 Art of the Renaissance
MW 3:00-4:20 ART B01
Instructor: Dr. Steele
Topic: Art and Life in 15th Century Florence: A study of aesthetic and intellectual directions in the Age of Humanism.
Repeatable for credit in different emphasis.
Prerequisite: ARTH 2302 (Survey II) or ART 1309, or consent of instructor.

The purpose is to introduce students to culture in 15th-century Florence, within which patrons and artists developed distinctive means of expressing ideas and values that we characterize as Renaissance art. Individual works are presented in the context of themes and issues rather than as a series of artists' biographies. Knowledge of these representative themes, in turn, offers the means to explore works of art in terms of relationships to such factors as religious ideology; patrons' concerns & artists' interests; humanism, civic identity, & religion; interplay between "scientific" attitudes and emergent art theory; and issues of gender.

Graduate Courses - Spring 2021

ARTH 5309 Theories of Contemporary Art
M 3:00-5:50 ART B02
Instructor: Dr Orfila

ARTH 5320 Arts of Medieval Europe
T 3:00-5:50 ART B01
Instructor: Dr Elliott
Topic: Art, Pilgrimage, and the Cult of Saints and Relics

In the Middle Ages, the bodies of the Christian saints and martyrs were believed to hold the power to heal and to absolve sins. People endured arduous pilgrimages believing that proximity to the sacred relics of the saints would benefit them in this life and the next. Pilgrimage was a dominant metaphor for the liminality of human existence. Life was considered a brief journey, both physical and metaphysical, towards an eternal afterlife. The market for relics to sustain the pilgrimage enterprise generated the imaginative use of the bodies, whole or fragmented, of holy men and women. This course will investigate the culture, geography, and the social and architectural infrastructure of pilgrimage and the cult of saints and relics throughout the Middle Ages, c. 500-1400. Students will study the tombs, the statues, the churches, the reliquaries, and other evidence of the material culture of pilgrimage sites across Europe and, potentially, the Middle East and North Africa. Students will have the opportunity to handle medieval manuscripts in facsimile at the Southwest Collection.