Texas Tech University

A&S Faculty News

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May 2019

Tortorelli Named Humanities Center Fellow

TTU Classics professor William TorterelliWilliam Tortorelli, an assistant professor of practice of Classics in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures (CMLL), has been named a 2019 Alumni College Fellow by the Humanities Center. He also has received a Program Development Grant to inaugurate a study abroad program in Sicily with colleague Sydnor Roy, an assistant professor of classics in CMLL.

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Ardon-Dryer Speaks at Science by the Glass

TTU atmospheric scientist Karin Ardon-DryerKarin Ardon-Dryer, an assistant professor of atmospheric science in the Department of Geosciences, spoke at the May 14 meeting of "Science by the Glass." Ardon-Dryer's topic was "Haboobs: Because Everything's Bigger in Texas." The meeting was hosted by the Texas Tech University Climate Science Center and held at Local Bar and Grill. The "Science by the Glass" lecture series provides a forum for discussion about topics in the fields of science, climate and society. Meetings are open to the public, and admission is free.

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Prada Awarded for Work in STEAM

TTU professor of forensic science Paola PradaPaola A. Prada, a research assistant professor and graduate program director at the Institute for Forensic Science in the Department of Environmental Toxicology, received the Outstanding Woman Leader (OWL) Award from the West Texas Association for Women in STEAM (WTAWIS). News of her win was published May 8. The group exists to recognize Texas Tech University faculty members for their support and encouragement of women in the fields of science, technology, engineering, agriculture and mathematics (STEAM). "As a double-minority scientist—female and Hispanic—it is truly rewarding that my student mentoring has helped young women gain the tools and inspiration necessary to pursue a career in the STEAM fields," Prada said. "Personally, it is a recognition that I am on the right path, that following my heart and passion for forensic science does work, that doing what I am passionate about works. Professionally, it means I can connect with more young, women students on a bigger scale, help more people and create positive change on a bigger scale. I put my heart and soul into my work at the Institute for Forensic Science, and to know that I have been rewarded by the young students I mentor truly means the world to me and is very humbling. I feel very proud to be able to set an example for my students and be an example that hard work and being passionate about what you do leads to success." Those who nominated Prada called her "an amazing woman leader who showcases integrity, perseverance and joy" both in and out of the classroom.

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Al-Hmoud Named 'Raider Who Rocks'

TTU Arabic instructor Rula Al-HmoudRula Al-Hmoud, coordinator and instructor for the Arabic program in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, is the 2019 recipient of the Raiders Who Rock "Above and Beyond Award." Also, two of her students who were inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society have named her one of the most influential teachers at Texas Tech.

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Brown Awarded for Work in STEAM

TTU biology professor Amanda M.V. BrownAmanda M.V. Brown, an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, received the Outstanding Woman Leader (OWL) Award from the West Texas Association for Women in STEAM (WTAWIS). News of her win was published May 8. The group exists to recognize Texas Tech University faculty members for their support and encouragement of women in the fields of science, technology, engineering, agriculture and mathematics (STEAM). "I feel so honored by this award," Brown said. "This supportive group is well-aligned with my goals to increase equity and help women succeed at the leading edges of science." One of Brown's nominators wrote, "She tailors her mentorship by adapting to the needs of the trainee through listening and gauging their interests and skill-development so they can be genuinely productive at their experiments—so the rewards of their work will be real and earned."

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Nes Receives Schroepfer Medal

TTU Horn Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry W. David Nes

W. David Nes, a Paul Whitfield Horn Distinguished Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry, received the 2019 Schroepfer Medal from the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) for his contributions to the field of steroid and sterol chemical research. The award, which was conferred at the AOCS annual meeting May 5-9 in St. Louis, is named in honor of the late Dr. George J. Schroepfer, Jr., a Rice University department chair in biochemistry whose pioneering studies in cholesterol and oxysterol biosynthesis contributed to understanding the role of cholesterol in heart disease. "This prestigious award is like the Nobel Prize in the field of steroid or sterol biochemistry," said Henry T. Nguyen, formerly a Paul Whitfield Horn Professor in the Department of Plant and Soil Science at Texas Tech and currently Curators' Distinguished Professor of Plant Sciences at the University of Missouri. Nes says his current interest is in the development of phyla-specific anti-amoeba drugs that target enzymes absent from the human genome but specific to Acanthamoeba, an organism responsible for blinding keratitis, and Naegleria steroidogenesis. Naegleria is known as the brain-eating amoeba. For a complete account of David Nes and his Schropefer win, follow this link.

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Wong Selected as Piper Professor

TTU history professor Aliza WongAliza Wong, an associate professor in the Department of History and associate dean of the Honors College, was selected as a 2019 Piper Professor by the Minnie Stevens Piper Foundation. She is one of only 10 selected in the State of Texas. Her selection was reported May 1 in Texas Tech Today. The Piper Professor Program began in 1958 to recognize outstanding professors from public and private two- and four-year colleges and universities in Texas. "I am very honored and humbled to be chosen as a Piper Professor," Wong said. "It's been several years since someone from Texas Tech was selected, so I am very fortunate to have been the candidate put forward for consideration and even more privileged to have been chosen as a Piper Professor." Sean Cunningham, an associate professor and chairman of the Department of History, wrote one of the recommendation letters endorsing Wong for the award. "There is no one more deserving of this recognition than Aliza Wong," Cunningham said. "I've been on faculty at Texas Tech since 2007, and consistently—each year—Aliza Wong is the most active, amiable, engaged, caring and productive educator I know. Students love her, even when she challenges them. She's an asset to Texas Tech, and I'm glad the Piper Program sees it that way, too." The award comes with a $5,000 honorarium, a gold pin and a certificate. Wong said that being named a Piper Professor also brings with it the distinction of standing among faculty who are committed not only to to pedagogy but also to mentoring and research, adding that her students have impacted her as much as she has them. "I think it's the students who make the teacher," she said. "I have been very privileged and extremely fortunate to work with diverse, intelligent and incredibly generous students who have taught me how to teach." 

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April 2019

TTU astrophysicist Tom Maccarone

Maccarone Steers Observatory Study

Tom Maccarone, a Presidential Research Excellence Professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy, has, over the past two years, played an integral role in developing a new way to study the stars. Now the design for a conceptual space-based observatory is headed to the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine's Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics, which establishes the astronomy community's priorities for the next decade. The project is being headed up by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) Space Science Division. For Maccarone, April 2019 begins an equally important chapter—ensuring that key decision makers understand the observatory's importance. The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) is a mission concept for an X-ray observatory that will specialize in rapid time variability. The satellite would gather information from black holes, neutron stars, transient events and cosmic explosions such as the violent destruction of stars in the grip of black holes and binary neutron star collisions. The estimated cost to build the observatory is $880 million. "We hope the Decadal Survey will specifically say that STROBE-X should be done," said Maccarone, a Presidential Research Excellence Professor. "But even if they just say that high-collecting-area X-ray timing and spectroscopy are important, we should have a good chance to have our mission fly." For the complete article about Maccarone's STROBE-X study, follow this link.

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Piña-Watson Receives President's Excellence Award

TTU psychology professor Brandy Pina-WatsonBrandy Piña-Watson, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, received the President's Excellence in Diversity & Equity Award for Tenure-Track Faculty during a ceremony on April 30. Piña-Watson also is an affiliate of the Department of Human Development & Family Studies in the College of Human Sciences. The awards celebrate faculty, students and staff who exemplify Texas Tech University's commitment to advancing diversity and promoting equity and inclusiveness. The program was held in the Hall of Nations at the International Cultural Center, with Texas Tech University President Lawrence Schovanec addressing the nominees and winners. "A commitment to diversity not only grows the pool of talent on a campus, but supports an environment that makes greater use of our human resources," Schovanec said. In addition to recognition at the ceremony, Piña-Watson will receive a $2,500 research award in September. The awards were created by the Office of the President and administered by the Division of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion.

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McIntyre on Reptile Research Team

TTU reptile research team (l-r) professors Samantha Kahl, Nancy McIntyre, Carlos Portillo-Quintero, Gad Perry, and Robert Cox

Nancy McIntyre, a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, is on a research team that is studying two native reptile species: the desert massasauga rattlesnake and the spot-tailed earless lizard. The project, led by Texas Tech University (TTU), could result in better habitat management decisions. Both species are considered as "nearly threatened" and are currently under review for a change in status listing by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, according to an April 25 article in Texas Tech Today. Tracking habitat change over time will allow determination of whether human activities are positively or negatively impacting these species, and may give insight into how the snake and lizard are using the habitat that they now have. The reptile research project is supported by an approximately $870,000 grant from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. The TTU research team, pictured above from left to right, includes project leader Samantha Kahl, assistant professor of Natural Resources Management; Nancy McIntyre, professor of Biological Sciences; Carlos Portillo-Quintero, assistant professor of Natural Resources Management; Gad Perry, professor of Natural Resources Management; and Robert Cox, associate professor of Natural Resources Management. To read the full account of the reptile research project, follow this link.

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Jonsson Receives Teaching Award

TTU French professor Andrea JonssonAndrea Jonsson, assistant professor of French in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, was presented with the 2019 Hemphill Wells New Professor Excellence in Teaching Award during the Spring 2019 Faculty Convocation, held April 17.

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Witmore Receives Research Award

TTU professor of archaeology and classics Chris WitmoreChris Witmore, professor of archaeology and classics in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, was presented with the 2019 President's Excellence in Research Professorship Award during the Spring 2019 Faculty Convocation, held April 17.

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Bradatan Presents Twice at Conference

TTU sociology professor & chair Cristina BradatanCristina Bradatan, associate professor of sociology and chair of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology & Social Work, participated in two presentations at a meeting of the Population Association of America April 11-12. Bradatan served as a discussant on the topic "Empirical Assessments of Linked Human-Ecological Adaptive Responses to Climate Change" and was co-presenter of a poster, "A New Type of Urbanization? Climate Change Population Displacement and Urban Space Problem in Dhaka, Bangladesh."

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Levario Wins Lyerla Travel Grant

TTU history professor Miguel LevarioMiguel Levario, professor in the Department of History, received a $750 Gloria Lyerla Library Memorial Fund Research Travel Grant from Texas Tech University Libraries. The grant supports TTU scholars by helping them meet the costs of travel to reach rare or difficult-to-retrieve research materials in libraries, archives, museums and other repositories worldwide. Levario's 2019 research project is "Standing Our Ground: Mexican American Agrupaciones Protectoras and Racial Violence." Levario was recognized as a recipient during the Spring 2019 Faculty Convocation, held April 17.

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Gamez Chosen for Spectrochemistry Award

TTU chemistry professor Gerardo GamezGerardo Gamez, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, has won the Winter Conference Young Scientists Award in Plasma Spectrochemistry. The award is sponsored by Thermo Fisher Scientific and will be presented at the January 2020 Winter Conference in Tucson. Recipients of this award are recognized for their noteworthy achievements in conceptualization and development of novel instrumentation as well as the elucidation of fundamental events or processes involved in plasma spectrochemistry. The award also acknowledges the authorship of significant research papers or books that have had an influential role in new advancements and outstanding applications that open new fields of use for plasma spectrochemistry. Along with the recognition, Gamez will receive a certificate, a trophy and a $5,000 prize.

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Surliuga Speaks at Film Symposium

TTU professor of Italian language Victoria SurliugaVictoria Surliuga, an associate professor of Italian Studies and Italian Program Coordinator in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures, gave a conference presentation at the Tenth Film Symposium on New Trends in Modern and Contemporary Italian Cinema, held at Indiana University in Bloomington April 17-19. Her subject was "Federico Fellini and his actors Giulietta Masina and Marcello Mastroianni: A Jungian interpretation of their animus/anima archetypes and meta-characters."

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Wagner Presents Poster at Conference

TTU sociology professor Brandon WagnerBrandon Wagner, assistant professor of sociology in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology & Social Work, presented a poster at a meeting of the Population Association of America April 11-12. Wagner's topic was "The Affordable Care Act's Dependent Eligibility Expansion and Marriage Rates in Young Adults."

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Phillips Awarded Lyerla Travel Grant

TTU English professor Lisa PhillipsLisa Phillips, professor in the Department of English, received a $750 Gloria Lyerla Library Memorial Fund Research Travel Grant from Texas Tech University Libraries. The grant supports TTU scholars by helping them meet the costs of travel to reach rare or difficult-to-retrieve research materials in libraries, archives, museums and other repositories worldwide. Phillips' 2019 research project is "Embodied Sovereignty: The Story of Ishi's Life and Death as a Living Object on Display." Phillips was recognized as a recipient during the Spring 2019 Faculty Convocation, held April 17.

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Long, Unruh Receive Staff Appreciation Awards

TTU chemistry professors Robert Long and Daniel UnruhRobert D. Long, associate director and instructor, and Daniel Unruh, senior research associate for x-ray diffraction, are winners of Staff Appreciation Awards in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. Long won the 2019 Staff Appreciation Award—Administrative. Unruh won the 2019 Staff Appreciation Award—Technical. The awards were presented at the Chemistry departmental awards ceremony April 30.

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Flores-Yeffal Participates in 3 Presentations

TTU sociology professor Nadia Flores-YeffalNadia Y. Flores Yeffal, assistant professor of sociology in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology & Social Work, participated in three presentations at a meeting of the Population Association of America April 11-12. Flores-Yeffal was one of several in the session, "How (In)Visible Are the Health Risks of Climate Change?" And she was co-presenter of two posters: "The Effects of 287(g) and Sanctuary City Agreements on the Foreign-born Population in the United States" and of "A New Type of Urbanization? Climate Change Population Displacement and Urban Space Problem in Dhaka, Bangladesh."

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Christensen Wins Professing Excellence Award

TTU math professor Lars ChristensenLars Christensen, a professor in the Department of Mathematics & Statistics, is winner of the 2019 Professing Excellence Award. Winners of this award are nominated by students and have demonstrated their willingness to go above and beyond, both inside and outside the classroom, to impact the academic success of their students.

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Mechref Wins Mentoring Excellence Award

TTU chemistry professor and chair Yehia MechrefYehia Mechref, professor and chair in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, is winner of the 2019 Nancy J. Bell Graduate Faculty Excellence in Mentoring Award. Winners of this award are nominated by doctoral students. The Graduate School at Texas Tech University created this award to recognize those mentors who embody the spirit of a great mentor and have gone above and beyond in helping graduate students on their educational journey.

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McIntyre Heads Landscape Ecologists Group

TTU Biologist Nancy McIntyreNancy McIntyre, professor and associate chair in the Department of Biological Sciences, is the new president of the International Association for Landscape Ecology-North America. She was elected to the three-year term during the association's annual meeting, held this year in Ft. Collins, Colo., April 7-11. McIntyre described the overview of her presidency this way: "In the first year I will apprentice under the outgoing president, the second year I'll fly solo, and the third year I'll mentor the new president-elect. This is the largest group of landscape ecologists in the world. The U.S. chapter—which had already been the largest—just recently voted to merge with Canada and Mexico to form the North American chapter. So my main task will be to finalize that merger."

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Wang Receives Teachers Association Award

Yanlin Wang, an assistant professor of practice of Chinese and Applied Linguistics and coordinator of the Chinese Language Program in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures, has received the 2019 SIG Award from the Chinese Language Teachers Association (CLTA). While at the 2019 CLTA Annual Conference, held April 5-7 in Seattle, she also gave a presentation entitled "Design and Principle of Hybrid Chinese Beginning Course."

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Al-Hmoud Named Study Abroad Runner-Up

TTU Arabic instructor Rula Al-HmoudRula Al-Hmoud, an instructor in Arabic Language & Area Studies in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, was named runner-up for the The Donald R. Haragan Study Abroad Award, which recognizes the development and implementation of study abroad programs that support Texas Tech's commitment to providing high-quality international education opportunities. Her recognition came during the Global Vision Awards, held April 4, 2019, at the International Cultural Center. Al-Hmoud was noted for her passion for her culture and her dedication to helping shape the diverse study abroad opportunities for Texas Tech students. In addition to directing and teaching within the Arabic program, Al-Hmoud is the founder and director of Texas Tech's study abroad program in Amman, Jordan; founder of a study abroad program to Spain and Morocco to study Arabic; founder and adviser of the Arabic Language Student Organization; and co-founder of the Arabic Club of Texas Tech University. Winner of the Donald R. Haragan Study Abroad Award was Deborah Fowler, a professor and director of the Retail Management Program and associate chairperson in Hospitality and Retail Management in the College of Human Sciences, for bringing international diversity to study abroad programs.

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Poirier Receives 7th Welch Grant Renewal

TTU chemist and physicist Bill PoirierBill Poirier, a professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, has received the seventh renewal of his Welch Foundation Grant entitled "New Methodologies for Accurate Quantum Calculations of the Dynamics of Atomic Nuclei." The grant will be funded at $195,000 for three years beginning June 1, 2019. Poirier also is a joint professor of Physics and a Chancellor's Council Distinguished Research Awardee.

 

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Recent Books

"Moments of Joy and Heartbreak: 66 Significant Episodes in the History of the Pittsburgh Pirates"

Book by TTU's Jorge Iber, Moments of Joy and Heartbreak about the Pittsburgh PiratesJorge Iber, Associate Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences and Professor in the Department of History, leads as author and editor in this 208-page paperback, "Moments of Joy and Heartbreak: 66 Significant Episodes in the History of the Pittsburgh Pirates." The Pittsburgh Pirates have a long history, peppered with moments significant both to Pirates fans and Major League Baseball. While the Pirates are recognized as fielding the first all-black lineup in 1971, the 66 games in this book include one of the first matchups in the majors to involve two non-white opening hurlers (Native American and Cuban) in June 1921. We relive no-hitters, World Series-winning homers, and encounter the story of the last tripleheader ever played in major-league baseball. Some of the games are wins; some are losses. All of these essays provide readers with a sense of the totality of the Pirates' experiences: the joy, the heartbreak, and other aspects of baseball (and life) in between. This book is the work of 37 members of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), SABR Digital Library, Vol. 46, paperback. (Society for American Baseball Research, March 2018)

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"True Sex: the Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the Twentieth Century"

True Sex: the Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the Twentieth Century, by Emily Skidmore, TTUEmily Skidmore, Assistant Professor in the Department of History, uncovers the stories of 18 trans men who lived in the United States between 1876 and 1936 in "True Sex, the Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the Twentieth Century." At the turn of the 20th century, trans men were not necessarily urban rebels seeking to overturn stifling gender roles. In fact, they often sought to pass as conventional men, choosing to live in small towns where they led ordinary lives, aligning themselves with the expectations of their communities. They were, in a word, unexceptional. Despite the "unexceptional" quality of their lives, their stories are nonetheless surprising and moving, challenging much of what we think we know about queer history. By tracing the narratives surrounding the moments of "discovery" in these communities—from reports in local newspapers to medical journals and beyond—this book challenges the assumption that the full story of modern American sexuality is told by cosmopolitan radicals. Rather, "True Sex" reveals complex narratives concerning rural geography and community, persecution and tolerance, and how these factors intersect with the history of race, identity and sexuality in America. (NYU Press, September 2017)

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"The Restless Indian Plate and Its Epic Voyage from Gondwana to Asia"

Sankar Chatterjee Book "The Restless Indian Plate"Sankar Chatterjee, Horn Professor in the Department of Geosciences, writes that the fossil history of animal life in India is central to our understanding of the tectonic evolution of Gondwana, the dispersal of India, its northward journey, and its collision with Asia in "The Restless Indian Plate and Its Epic Voyage from Gondwana to Asia" . According to a review in Phys.org, "This beautifully illustrated volume provides the only detailed overview of the paleobiogeographic, tectonic, and paleoclimatic evolution of the Indian plate from Gondwana to Asia," and quotes Chatterjee and his colleagues as saying, "The tectonic evolution of the Indian plate represents one of the most dramatic and epic voyages of all drifting continents: 9,000 kilometers in 160 million years. ... The extensive reshuffling of the Indian plate was accompanied by multiple temporary filter bridges, resulting in the cosmopolitan nature of tetrapod fauna." The review goes on to conclude that "This thorough, up-to-date volume is a must-have reference for researchers and students in Indian geology, paleontology, plate tectonics, and collision of continents." (The Geological Society of America, July 2017)

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"Modern Sport Ethics: A Reference Handbook, 2nd Edition"

Angel Lumpkin Modern Sport EthicsAngela Lumpkin, Professor and Chair of the Department of Exercise & Sport Science, offers, in "Modern Sport Ethics: A Reference Handbook, 2nd Edition," descriptions and examples of unethical behaviors in sport that will challenge readers to think about how they view sport and question whether participating in sport builds character—especially at the youth and amateur levels. Sport potentially can teach character as well as social and moral values, but only when these positive concepts are consistently taught, modeled, and reinforced by sport leaders with the moral courage to do so. The seeming moral crisis threatening amateur and youth sport—evidenced by athletes, coaches, and parents alike making poor ethical choices—and ongoing scandals regarding performance-enhancing drug use by professional athletes make sports ethics a topic of great concern. This work enables readers to better understand the ethical challenges facing competitive sport by addressing issues such as gamesmanship, doping, cheating, sportsmanship, fair play, and respect for the game. A compelling read for coaches, sport administrators, players, parents, and sport fans, the book examines specific examples of unethical behaviors—many cases of which occur in amateur and educational sports—to illustrate how these incidents threaten the perception that sport builds character. It identifies and investigates the multiple reasons for cheating in sport, such as the fact that the rewards for succeeding are so high, and the feeling of athletes that they must behave as they do to "level the playing field" because everyone else is cheating, being violent, taking performance-enhancing drugs, or doing whatever it takes to win. Readers will gain insight into how coaches and sport administrators can achieve the goals for youth, interscholastic, intercollegiate, and Olympic sport by stressing moral values and character development as well as see how specific recommendations can help ensure that sport can serve to build character rather than teach bad behavior in the pursuit of victory. (ABC-CLIO, December 2016)

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"Introduction to Physical Education, Exercise Science, and Sport" 10th Edition

“INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION, EXERCISE SCIENCE, AND SPORT” 10th Edition

Angela Lumpkin, Professor and Chair of the Department of Exercise & Sport Science, gives college students a wide-angle view of physical education, exercise science, sport, and the wealth of careers available in these fields in the 10th Edition of "Introduction to Physical Education, Exercise Science, and Sport." The textbook provides the principles, history, and future of physical education, exercise science, and sport. Lumpkin's clear writing style engages the reader while covering the most important introductory topics in this updated introduction to the world of physical education. (McGraw-Hill, July 2016)

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"God's Foolishness"

God's Foolishness William Wenthe TTUWilliam Wenthe, Professor in the Department Of English, explores painful and fleeting emotions within the 96 pages of "God's Foolishness." Here, he mines the feelings of human uncertainty in matters of love and desire, time and death, and uncovers difficult truths with transformative insights. These are poems of crisis. Wenthe examines our conflicting urges to see nature as sustenance and to foolishly destroy it. His poems shift from close observation to panorama with cinematic fluidity, from a tea mug to an ancient monument, from a warbler on an elm branch to the specter of imminent natural disaster. Offering passion and intellect balanced with a careful concern for poetic craft, Wenthe's "God's Foolishness" gives us fine poems to savor and admire. Watch the YouTube video here. (LSU, May 2016)

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"Before the Gregorian Reform: The Latin Church at the Turn of the First Millennium"

Before the Gregorian Reform, John Howe TTUJohn Howe, Professor in the Department of History, challenges the familiar narrative that the era from about 1050 to 1150 was the pivotal moment in the history of the Latin Church. The status quo states it was then that the Gregorian Reform movement established the ecclesiastical structure that would ensure Rome's dominance throughout the Middle Ages and beyond. In "Before the Gregorian Reform," Howe examines earlier, "pre-Gregorian" reform efforts within the Church—and finds that they were more extensive and widespread than previously thought and that they actually established a foundation for the subsequent Gregorian Reform movement. The low point in the history of Christendom came in the late ninth and early tenth centuries—a period when much of Europe was overwhelmed by barbarian raids and widespread civil disorder, which left the Church in a state of disarray. As Howe shows, however, the destruction gave rise to creativity. Aristocrats and churchmen rebuilt churches and constructed new ones, competing against each other so that church building, like castle building, acquired its own momentum. Patrons strove to improve ecclesiastical furnishings, liturgy, and spirituality. Schools were constructed to staff the new churches. Moreover, Howe shows that these reform efforts paralleled broader economic, social, and cultural trends in Western Europe including the revival of long-distance trade, the rise of technology, and the emergence of feudal lordship. The result was that by the mid-eleventh century a wealthy, unified, better-organized, better-educated, more spiritually sensitive Latin Church was assuming a leading place in the broader Christian world. "Before the Gregorian Reform" challenges us to rethink the history of the Church and its place in the broader narrative of European history. Compellingly written and generously illustrated, it is a book for all medievalists as well as general readers interested in the Middle Ages and Church history. (Cornell University Press, March 2016)

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"New Developments in Biological and Chemical Terrorism Countermeasures"

New Developments in Biological and Chemical Terrorism Counter Measures

Ronald J. Kendal, Professor of Environmental Toxicology; Steven Presley, Professor of Immuno-toxicology; and Seshadri Ramkumar, Professor of Countermeasures to Biological Threats, all from the Department of Environmental Toxicology, have co-edited the newly published textbook, “New Developments in Biological and Chemical Terrorism Countermeasures.” The volume compiles a decade's worth of research through TTU's Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr. National Program for Countermeasures to Biological and Chemical Threats, and updated many changes in the field since an earlier book, “Advances in Biological and Chemical Terrorism Countermeasures,” came out in 2008. “It's not just for college students,” Ramkumar said. “It's a tool for people in the field, from first responders all the way to policy makers.” (CRC Press, February 2016)

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"Psychoanalytic Treatment in Adults: A Longitudinal Study of Change"

Rosemary Cogan Psychoanalytic Treatment of AdultsRosemary Cogan, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, is co-author of "Psychonalytic Treatment in Adults: A longitudinal study of change." The book draws from 60 first-hand case studies to explore the outcomes of psychoanalytic treatment, providing examples of the long-term effectiveness of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic work as it delineates negative therapeutic treatment and discusses crucial changes in care. Outcomes of psychoanalysis, as with other psychotherapies, vary considerably. Cogan and her co-author, J.H. Porcerelli, used the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure to describe a patient at the beginning of psychoanalysis and every six months until the analysis ended. This allowed the authors to learn about changes over analysis and, in turn, improved treatment planning and practice for the well-being of other patients. Findings will be of interest to researchers and academics in the fields of psychoanalysis, psychotherapy, psychodynamic therapy, psychoanalytic education, psychiatry and psychology, and should also help clinicians recognize potential problems early in analytic treatments in order to work more effectively with patients. (Routeledge, February 2016)

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