Texas Tech University

Fall 2016 Courses

  • Campus Map - the English/Philosophy building is #46, located in D1

2000-Level Course Descriptions

2305.005 Introduction to Poetry: “King Arthur the Briton, Breton, & British King”

Sarah Sprouse
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
CRN: 11462

Description
While popular interest in poetry has declined in the last hundred years, King Arthur continues to be a mainstay in our culture. What is it about King Arthur (and his knights!) that fascinates us? Why is he the most enduring and memorable character from the medieval period? What role did he play in the development of poetic form and the clash of cultures in medieval Europe? We will explore possible answers to all of these questions as we chart Arthur's rise from Welsh bardic poetry to T. S. Eliot's devastating poem “The Waste Land.” This vast chronological landscape will give us room to consider the changing cultural expectations of entertainment in its poetic form. In order to conceptualize medieval engagement with poetry as “entertainment,” we will engage in a multi-modal approach to our study by looking at manuscript images, listening to recordings of performances, and even performing poetry in class. This course satisfies the Texas Tech University core curriculum requirement in humanities, contributing to the Competency Statement for the Humanities: “Students graduating from Texas Tech University should be able to think critically and demonstrate an understanding of the possibility of multiple interpretations, cultural contexts, and values.”

Learning Objectives
The University Catalog states that “the objective of the humanities in a core curriculum is to expand the student's knowledge of the human condition and human cultures, especially in relation to behaviors, ideas, and values expressed in works of the human imagination and thought. Through study in disciplines such as literature and philosophy, students will engage in critical analysis and develop an appreciation of the humanities as fundamental to the health and survival of any society.” By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Articulate and evaluate the historical contexts that shaped the development of Arthurian poetry.
  2. Differentiate the poetic forms that contribute to region-specific Arthurian poetry and describe them.
  3. Develop analytical arguments of primary sources in both written and oral forms.
  4. Interpret and analyze Arthurian poetry from different regions and periods.
  5. Develop an appreciation of the entertainment value of Arthurian poetry in its medieval contexts and think creatively about aesthetics of this tradition.
  6. Assess the changing Arthurian tradition in the twentieth century.

Learning Assessments
The objectives listed above will be assessed in the following ways:

  1. In-class writing assignments, group-work, short essays.
  2. Group-work, reading quizzes, homework assignments.
  3. Primary source essay, including one revision.
  4. Homework assignments, in-class writing assignments, class discussion.
  5. Class discussion, creative group project.
  6. Class discussion, in-class writing assignments, group-work.

Required Texts
Bromwich, Rachel, ed. & trans. Trioedd Ynys Prydein: The Triads of the Isle of Britain. University of Wales Press, 2016.

Ford, Patrick K., ed. & trans. The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales. University of California Press, 2008.

Wilhelm, James J., ed. & trans. The Romance of Arthur: An Anthology of Medieval Texts in Translation. Routledge, 2013.

Tennyson, Alfred Lord. Idylls of the King. Penguin Classics, 1989.

Eliot, T. S. The Waste Land and Other Poems. Penguin Classics, 2003.

Additional Supplemental Readings will be supplied by the instructor.

2305.006 Introduction to Poetry: “King Arthur the Briton, Breton, & British King”

Sarah Sprouse
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM
CRN: 11399

Description
While popular interest in poetry has declined in the last hundred years, King Arthur continues to be a mainstay in our culture. What is it about King Arthur (and his knights!) that fascinates us? Why is he the most enduring and memorable character from the medieval period? What role did he play in the development of poetic form and the clash of cultures in medieval Europe? We will explore possible answers to all of these questions as we chart Arthur's rise from Welsh bardic poetry to T. S. Eliot's devastating poem “The Waste Land.” This vast chronological landscape will give us room to consider the changing cultural expectations of entertainment in its poetic form. In order to conceptualize medieval engagement with poetry as “entertainment,” we will engage in a multi-modal approach to our study by looking at manuscript images, listening to recordings of performances, and even performing poetry in class. This course satisfies the Texas Tech University core curriculum requirement in humanities, contributing to the Competency Statement for the Humanities: “Students graduating from Texas Tech University should be able to think critically and demonstrate an understanding of the possibility of multiple interpretations, cultural contexts, and values.”

Learning Objectives
The University Catalog states that “the objective of the humanities in a core curriculum is to expand the student's knowledge of the human condition and human cultures, especially in relation to behaviors, ideas, and values expressed in works of the human imagination and thought. Through study in disciplines such as literature and philosophy, students will engage in critical analysis and develop an appreciation of the humanities as fundamental to the health and survival of any society.” By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Articulate and evaluate the historical contexts that shaped the development of Arthurian poetry.
  2. Differentiate the poetic forms that contribute to region-specific Arthurian poetry and describe them.
  3. Develop analytical arguments of primary sources in both written and oral forms.
  4. Interpret and analyze Arthurian poetry from different regions and periods.
  5. Develop an appreciation of the entertainment value of Arthurian poetry in its medieval contexts and think creatively about aesthetics of this tradition.
  6. Assess the changing Arthurian tradition in the twentieth century.

Learning Assessments
The objectives listed above will be assessed in the following ways:

  1. In-class writing assignments, group-work, short essays.
  2. Group-work, reading quizzes, homework assignments.
  3. Primary source essay, including one revision.
  4. Homework assignments, in-class writing assignments, class discussion.
  5. Class discussion, creative group project.
  6. Class discussion, in-class writing assignments, group-work.

Required Texts
Bromwich, Rachel, ed. & trans. Trioedd Ynys Prydein: The Triads of the Isle of Britain. University of Wales Press, 2016.

Ford, Patrick K., ed. & trans. The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales. University of California Press, 2008.

Wilhelm, James J., ed. & trans. The Romance of Arthur: An Anthology of Medieval Texts in Translation. Routledge, 2013.

Tennyson, Alfred Lord. Idylls of the King. Penguin Classics, 1989.

Eliot, T. S. The Waste Land and Other Poems. Penguin Classics, 2003.

Additional Supplemental Readings will be supplied by the instructor.

2306.002 Introduction to Drama: "Call Me Bill: Shakespeare Adaptation and Appropriation in Film and Media"

Joya Mannan
MWF 9:00-9:50 AM
CRN: 37802

Description
This course explores film adaptations of William Shakespeare's plays. We will examine early and recent adaptations, ones that preserve the original early modern English language, others that challenge genre conventions, and films from other countries and cultures, too. In addition to film adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, we will be reading Shakespeare's plays as well since it is important to understand the original source material in order to adequately analyze and interpret an adaptation.

Throughout the semester, we will investigate whether film adaptations of plays should be judged as plays or as films. We will learn about staging, stylistic choices, and how to analyze films. Finally, we will explore the effect of the transposition of Shakespeare's works in different forms (printed, stage performance, film adaptation, audio, digital), and we will determine the effect modern interpretations of Shakespeare's works have on society and culture today.

2307.001 Introduction to Fiction: Late 19th-Early 20th Centuries American Women Writers

Mike Lemon
MWF 9:00-9:50 AM
CRN: 36497

Description
"I want something to do." So opens Louisa May Alcott's Hospital Sketches (1863), articulating American women's growing restlessness with the nineteenth century's separate spheres ideology. In the decades between the American Civil War and the passing of the Nineteenth Amendment, women writers used poetry, nonfiction, and fiction to criticize the limited role of women in United States culture(s). This section of Introduction to Fiction focuses on short stories and novels that question the construction of femininity during these decades.

We will accomplish these analyses through two considerations. One, students will learn to identify how authors use literary elements (narrative perspective, irony, sentimental language, pathetic humor, foreshadowing, etc.) and generic conventions (romanticism, realism, regionalism, and the Western) to build a text's plot and tone.

Two, students will recognize how these women writers explore cultural and social constructions of womanhood. Through the works of such authors as Louisa May Alcott, Mary Austin, Willa Cather, Kate Chopin, Sui Sin Far, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Frances Harper, and Sarah Orne Jewett, students and I will investigate the discursive means through which these women writers discuss race, economics, sexuality, and individual sovereignty.

Methods of assessment include classroom and online participation, class presentations, a midterm exam, and a term exam.

2307.005 Introduction to Fiction: "Are We Getting Scared Yet?: Horror Writing Since the 19th Century"

Chad Abushanab
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
CRN: 11631

Description
Let's face it: we love to be scared. Whether it's in a dark movie theater while a masked slasher stalks the screen, during television shows where zombies gnaw on innocent flesh, or sitting up late, reading by a single bulb, too afraid to close the book without reaching that crucial sense of closure. But what is it, exactly, that makes a story scary? And why is it that we gravitate towards horror in such droves? What is it that has kept this incredibly popular genre of writing alive for so long?

These are the kind of questions you'll keep in mind as we make a terrifying odyssey through the last 100+ years of horror in short stories and novels. Starting with the classic tales of terror by Edgar Allan Poe, you'll look at how horror writing has changed over the decades, making your way through modern masters of horror like Richard Matheson (Hell House, and others) and Stephen King ("Jerusalem's Lot," Carrie, and other), and finally arriving at more contemporary works like Robert Kirkman's haunting and popular graphic novel The Walking Dead. We'll discuss these works both as entertainment and art - but always as something meant to be enjoyed.

Methods of assessment include vigorous class discussion, short writing assignments, individual and group presentations, and other activities. 

2307.008 Introduction to Fiction: “Monsters and Heroes in Fiction”

Alexis Milmine
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
CRN: 11651

Description
Why do we, as a society, have such a fascination with monsters and horror and why do TV shows and movies, such as Supernatural, Grimm, Vampire Diaries, and the myriad of Dracula and Underworld movies feature heavily in American popular culture? In this course we will be examining the use of monsters and the heroes that slay them in fiction, from some of the earliest prose pieces of monsters through various time periods and cultures to trace the development of the monster and what it means to be a hero in these narratives. Was Beowulf a hero or a murderer? Can you have a sympathetic monster? Do our ideas of monsters stay the same throughout time and place? Can the human always be considered a hero? We will be examining these questions and more in our search for how we define monsters and heroes.

Some of the texts we will be looking at are the prose Beowulf, Dracula, Frankenstein, and The Hobbit, as well as other short primary and secondary selections on a wide selection of monsters: vampires, werewolves, zombies, and ogres to name a few. We will also be examining how monsters and heroes are translated from literature to both TV and movies.

Your main assignments will be a course Twitter feed on monsters and heroes in literature and popular culture, short reflection papers (1-2 pp.) on the readings and discussion in class, midterm, and final paper (3-5 pp.) on an interesting element of monsters and heroes through the course of our class.

2307.005 Introduction to Fiction: "Are We Getting Scared Yet?: Horror Writing Since the 19th Century"

Chad Abushanab
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM
CRN: 11675

Description
Let's face it: we love to be scared. Whether it's in a dark movie theater while a masked slasher stalks the screen, during television shows where zombies gnaw on innocent flesh, or sitting up late, reading by a single bulb, too afraid to close the book without reaching that crucial sense of closure. But what is it, exactly, that makes a story scary? And why is it that we gravitate towards horror in such droves? What is it that has kept this incredibly popular genre of writing alive for so long?

These are the kind of questions you'll keep in mind as we make a terrifying odyssey through the last 100+ years of horror in short stories and novels. Starting with the classic tales of terror by Edgar Allan Poe, you'll look at how horror writing has changed over the decades, making your way through modern masters of horror like Richard Matheson (Hell House, and others) and Stephen King ("Jerusalem's Lot," Carrie, and other), and finally arriving at more contemporary works like Robert Kirkman's haunting and popular graphic novel The Walking Dead. We'll discuss these works both as entertainment and art - but always as something meant to be enjoyed.

Methods of assessment include vigorous class discussion, short writing assignments, individual and group presentations, and other activities. 

2307.027 Introduction to Fiction: “Monsters and Heroes in Fiction”

Alexis Milmine
TR 11:00-12:20 PM
CRN: 11789

Description
Why do we, as a society, have such a fascination with monsters and horror and why do TV shows and movies, such as Supernatural, Grimm, Vampire Diaries, and the myriad of Dracula and Underworld movies feature heavily in American popular culture? In this course we will be examining the use of monsters and the heroes that slay them in fiction, from some of the earliest prose pieces of monsters through various time periods and cultures to trace the development of the monster and what it means to be a hero in these narratives. Was Beowulf a hero or a murderer? Can you have a sympathetic monster? Do our ideas of monsters stay the same throughout time and place? Can the human always be considered a hero? We will be examining these questions and more in our search for how we define monsters and heroes.

Some of the texts we will be looking at are the prose Beowulf, Dracula, Frankenstein, and The Hobbit, as well as other short primary and secondary selections on a wide selection of monsters: vampires, werewolves, zombies, and ogres to name a few. We will also be examining how monsters and heroes are translated from literature to both TV and movies.

Your main assignments will be a course Twitter feed on monsters and heroes in literature and popular culture, short reflection papers (1-2 pp.) on the readings and discussion in class, midterm, and final paper (3-5 pp.) on an interesting element of monsters and heroes through the course of our class.

2307.029 Introduction to Fiction: “Desire, Love, and Sex: The Romance Novel Then and Now”

Robin Blanchard
TR 12:30-1:50 PM
CRN: 11800

Description
In this course, we will explore the origins and significance of what we now call the romance novel, a genre that has its roots in the Romantic period of literature. By identifying and analyzing common romance tropes in both nineteenth-century and contemporary novels, we will come to understand that the romance novel is still remarkably the same. Why is this important? That's one question we'll attempt to answer throughout the semester as we engage with four texts: Twilight by Stephenie Meyer (2005), Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (1813), Fifty Shades of Grey by E. L. James (2011), and Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy (1891). We will work together to read and understand these texts, using class discussion, group work, short (less than one page) writing assignments, two longer (3-5 pages) writing assignments, and an in-class presentation as assessments. Whether you are already familiar or want to become familiar with the romance genre, or are just looking for an interesting class to take, my hope is that you will join me on an exciting journey through literature.

2307.H02 Introduction to Fiction: “Hard-Boiled Crime Fiction”

Dr. Michael Borshuk
TR 2:00-3:20 PM
CRN: 28863
**Honors Section**

Description
This section of 2307 will introduce students to fiction's generic conventions, and to strategies for critical interpretation, by exploring one of the most American fiction genres: hard-boiled crime fiction. Beginning with the foundational Black Mask school of crime writers, we will cover a wide historical range of hard-boiled writers, with attention to their influences, their artistic innovations, and their stylistic departures from the mystery and crime writers who preceded them. As we move forward chronologically, we will also pay attention to significant revisions to hard-boiled crime's signature characteristics by more contemporary American practitioners of the form. Students will leave the course with an understanding of fiction's key characteristics (including for instance, plot, narrative voice, setting, and dialogue) and will develop this understanding through extensive critical writing, including three formal papers.

2371.001 Language in a Multicultural America

Dr. Aaron Braver
TR 2:00-3:20 PM
CRN: 13140
**Fulfills only Multicultural Requirement**

Description
America is a country of great diversity—racially, economically, politically. How does this diversity translate to the way we speak? What can we learn about a person from how they talk? This course investigates the relationship between language and social diversity in the US. We'll cover issues including race, gender, sexual orientation, and power relations, exploring how each impacts (and is impacted by) our way of talking. We'll be doing hands-on data collection, learning the methods employed by sociolinguists to gather and analyze peoples' speech. We'll also discuss topics including the “Oberserver's Paradox”, regional identity (especially Texan identity), official languages, sex and gender, and political language.

This course is suited to anyone interested in how people and their language work—including creative writers, literature and TCR majors/minors, and anthropology, sociology and psychology majors.

2391.HO2 Introduction to Literary Studies: "Powerful, Complex, and Strange"

Dr. Bruce Clarke
TR 2:00-3:20 PM
CRN: 33066
**Honors Section**

Description
In this section of English 2391 you will practice skills that will prepare you for success in your majors in any discipline, but especially in English. We will examine the key forms and themes of poetry, fiction, and drama; comedy and tragedy; prose narrative and cinematic narrative; and key concepts and methods of literary criticism and theory. Students will develop advanced research skills and scholarly writing proficiency. Studying a select handful of traditional and contemporary texts, you will have ample time and guidance over the semester to prepare and successfully complete four literary papers of increasing depth. There will be occasional quizzes and a final exam. ENGL 2391 fulfills the core Language, Philosophy and Culture requirement.

Texts
Bennett and Royle, An Introduction to Literature, Criticism, and Theory (9781138119031)
A. S. Byatt, Possession (9780679735908)
Debra Granik, director, Winter's Bone, DVD
MLA Handbook, 8th edition (9781603292627)
William Shakespeare, Midsummer Night's Dream (9780743477543)
William Shakespeare, King Lear (9780743484954)
Daniel Woodrell, Winter's Bone (9780316066419)

2391.005 Introduction to Literary Studies: “Fantastic Landscapes”

Dr. Cordelia Barrera
TR 8:00-9:20 AM
CRN: 13311

Description
If you like American literature and poetry that exists between the spaces of the ordinary world and a psychological shadowland, then “Fantastic Landscapes” is the course for you. In this class, we will read and discuss haunting and strange works of literature that overlap genres. Our focus will be works of speculative fiction, horror, fantasy, magical realism, and the American Gothic. “Fantastic Landscapes” in an introduction to the practice of critical literary study that focuses on space, place, and fantastic, often “haunted” settings. We will read short stories, long fiction, and poetry that include the strange, weird tales of Carlos Fuentes, Stephen King, Ursula K. Le Guin, Gloria Anzaldúa, Juan Pablo Villalobos, and Katherine Anne Porter, among others. Assignments include: weekly journals, several short research projects, and daily quizzes and group work. ENGL 2391 fulfills core Language, Philosophy and Culture requirement.

2391.006 Introduction to Literary Studies: “Fantastic Landscapes”

Dr. Cordelia Barrera
TR 9:30-10:50 AM
CRN: 13304

Description
If you like American literature and poetry that exists between the spaces of the ordinary world and a psychological shadowland, then “Fantastic Landscapes” is the course for you. In this class, we will read and discuss haunting and strange works of literature that overlap genres. Our focus will be works of speculative fiction, horror, fantasy, magical realism, and the American Gothic. “Fantastic Landscapes” in an introduction to the practice of critical literary study that focuses on space, place, and fantastic, often “haunted” settings. We will read short stories, long fiction, and poetry that include the strange, weird tales of Carlos Fuentes, Stephen King, Ursula K. Le Guin, Gloria Anzaldúa, Juan Pablo Villalobos, and Katherine Anne Porter, among others. Assignments include: weekly journals, several short research projects, and daily quizzes and group work. ENGL 2391 fulfills core Language, Philosophy and Culture requirement.

3000-Level Course Descriptions

Literature/Linguistics/Creative Writing
Unless otherwise noted, all 3000-level courses in LCWL have a prerequisite of 6 hours of 2000-level English courses.

3302.001 Old and Middle English Literature

Dr. Brian McFadden
MWF 2:00-2:50 PM
CRN: 33595

Description
TBA

3308.002 Nineteenth Century British Literature: “Victorian Transformations”

Dr. Alison Rukavina
TR 12:30-1:50 PM
CRN: 13461

Description
This fall take ENGL 3308.002 that introduces you to British literature of the Victorian age that engaged with the profound social, political, and technical transformations that marked the period. The Industrial Revolution led to rapid economic and social changes, including demands for labor reform, Darwin's theory of evolution challenged religious faith, and developments in medicine and psychology introduced new ways of understanding mental illness. Revolutions in social and political thought also led to the “Woman Question” and debates about a woman's place in society. Advances in technology and communication radically altered the book trade and how and what Victorians read, while the rapid growth of the British Empire spread Victorian values globally and introduced foreign cultures and concepts at home. In this course, students will survey a variety of Victorian works including Jane Eyre, Jekyll and Hyde, Importance of Being Earnest, and penny dreadfuls (cheap serialized fiction/ Victorian comics). As part of the class, students will visit and use nineteenth-century texts in the TTU Special Collections Library and watch a demonstration of the nineteenth-century printing press in the Letterpress Studio.

3308.D01 Nineteenth Century British Literature: “Victorian Literature and Society”

Dr. Alison Rukavina
ONLINE T 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 35481

Description
“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness.” While Charles Dickens wrote the opening lines of his novel Tale of Two Cities about the French Revolution, these lines also described the Victorian era (1830-1901) with its profound social, political, and cultural upheaval that transformed British society. The Industrial Revolution led to rapid economic and social changes, including demands for labor reform, Darwin's theory of evolution challenged religious faith, and developments in medicine and psychology introduced new ways of understanding mental illness. Developments in social and political thought led to debates about a woman's place in society, and the rapid growth of the British Empire spread Victorian values globally and introduced foreign cultures and concepts at home. Students in this distance course will read Victorian literary works, including novels, short stories, and poetry, by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Charlotte Brontë, Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Conrad and others that engaged with these transformations.

Texts
Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre
Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness
Robert Louis Stevenson's Jekyll and Hyde
Elizabeth Barrett Browning's “Cry of the Children,” Alfred Lord Tennyson's “Lady of Shallot” as well as other poems and readings

Assignments
Participation in weekly asynchronous discussion on Blackboard Collaborate; short directed reading responses to readings and lecture; two essays (including drafts); individual project.

3324.001 Nineteenth Century American Literature: “Realist Novels”

Dr. John Samson
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
CRN: 13533

Description
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the major authors and themes in 19th-century American realist novels. Realism developed in opposition to the romanticism of the first half of the century and focused on representing the whole social world, particularly relations between the genders. In discussing these issues, students will also develop their skills in literary interpretation and analysis: to determine what details in a text are significant, to find and develop topics from the text, and to write analytical essays. Texts: Fanny Fern, Ruth Hall (1855); Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, The Silent Partner (1871); Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876); Henry Adams, Democracy (1880); William Dean Howells, Indian Summer (1886); and Harold Frederic, The Damnation of Theron Ware (1896).

3324.002 Nineteenth Century American Literature: “Bootstrappers and Born Losers”

Instructor: Dr. Elissa Zellinger
TR 2:00-3:20 PM
CRN: 33012

Description
This course explores American literature from 1800 to 1900 across a range of authors and genres. In order to focus our examination, we will investigate the relationship between hard work and success in the United States. Do self-reliance and a good work ethic necessarily meet with achievement in America? Are some people born to lose, and is it their fault? We will invoke our current economic climate as a reference point in order to compare contemporary experiences of prosperity and ruin with our selected readings.

Selected readings may include (many of which are available for free online)

  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
  • Washington Irving, “Rip Van Winkle”
  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • The Life of P.T. Barnum
  • Louisa May Alcott, Hospital Sketches
  • Selected poems by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson
  • Herman Melville, selected short stories and poems
  • Horatio Alger, Ragged Dick
  • W. E. B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
  • Zitkala-Ša, The School Days of an Indian Girl
  • Stephen Crane, selected short stories and poems

3325.001 Modern and Contemporary American Literature: “From Postmodernism to Post-9/11 Globalism”

Dr. Yuan Shu
TR 9:30-10:50 AM
CRN: 13551

Description
This course explores the major paradigm shifts in contemporary American literature since the 1960s, from postmodernism to multiculturalism, from postcolonial historicism to post-9/11 globalism. Reading the works of diverse American authors, we investigate how they articulate their visions and understandings of American experiences in response to the social, political, economic, cultural, and technological changes in the United States and around the globe. We begin by reading texts that engage the technological and cultural changes in American society in the 1960s and discuss the ways in which these authors negotiate and reimagine our changing sense of humanity. We then scrutinize writings of racial minorities and women and analyze the new critical vigor and sensibilities that they have brought to enrich American literary, cultural, and linguistic experiences. As a gesture of conclusion, we finally consider texts that speculate upon the possibility of a post-ethnic and post-human society in America in the twenty-first century. The coursework consists of two essays, five quizzes, a midterm and a final. There is a strict attendance policy, and it kicks in from the first day a student is registered in the class.

Texts

  • Paul Lauter, The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Vol. E.
  • Don DeLillo, Libra.
  • David Henry Hwang, M. Butterfly.
  • Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon.
  • Jane Smiley, A Thousand Acres.
  • Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.

3325.002 Modern and Contemporary American Literature: “From Postmodernism to Post-9/11 Globalism”

Dr. Yuan Shu
TR 12:30-1:50 PM
CRN: 13554

Description
This course explores the major paradigm shifts in contemporary American literature since the 1960s, from postmodernism to multiculturalism, from postcolonial historicism to post-9/11 globalism. Reading the works of diverse American authors, we investigate how they articulate their visions and understandings of American experiences in response to the social, political, economic, cultural, and technological changes in the United States and around the globe. We begin by reading texts that engage the technological and cultural changes in American society in the 1960s and discuss the ways in which these authors negotiate and reimagine our changing sense of humanity. We then scrutinize writings of racial minorities and women and analyze the new critical vigor and sensibilities that they have brought to enrich American literary, cultural, and linguistic experiences. As a gesture of conclusion, we finally consider texts that speculate upon the possibility of a post-ethnic and post-human society in America in the twenty-first century. The coursework consists of two essays, five quizzes, a midterm and a final. There is a strict attendance policy, and it kicks in from the first day a student is registered in the class.

Texts

  • Paul Lauter, The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Vol. E.
  • Don DeLillo, Libra.
  • David Henry Hwang, M. Butterfly.
  • Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon.
  • Jane Smiley, A Thousand Acres.
  • Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.

3325.D01 Modern and Contemporary American Literature

Dr. Kerry Fine
ONLINE M 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 35482

Description
TBA

3336.001 Early Modern World Literature

Dr. Ryan Hackenbracht
MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
CRN: 37196
**Prerequisite: 3 hours of 2000-level English courses**

Description
This course looks at masterpieces of European literature from 1400-1900, with a focus on literary genre and form and historical-political contexts. Readings will include Milton's Paradise Lost, Cervantes's Don Quixote, Shakespeare's Hamlet, Goethe's Faust, Voltaire's Candide, and Dostoevsky's Notes from the Underground.

3351.001 Creative Writing: Non-Fiction

Dr. Dennis Covington
MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
CRN: 13615

Description
TBA

3351.002 Creative Writing: Poetry

Dr. John Poch
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
CRN: 13616

Description
TBA

3351.004 Creative Writing: Non-Fiction

Dr. Dennis Covington
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM
CRN: 13628

Description
TBA

3351.005 Creative Writing: Fiction

Dr. Katie Cortese
TR 9:30-10:50 AM
CRN: 13641

Description
TBA

3351.007 Creative Writing: Fiction

Dr. Katie Cortese
TR 12:30-1:50 PM
CRN: 33009

Description
TBA

3351.009 Creative Writing: Poetry

Dr. William Wenthe
TR 2:00-3:20 PM
CRN: 34004

Description
TBA

3351.012 Creative Writing: Poetry

Dr. William Wenthe
TR 3:30-4:50 PM
CRN: 13647

Description
TBA

3371.001 Linguistic Science

Dr. Aaron Braver
TR 9:30-10:50 PM
CRN: 33013
**Prerequisite: 3 hours of 2000-level English courses**

Description
Language touches every aspect of our lives. From reading the morning paper to decrypting secret codes, the subconscious knowledge of language is uniquely human. In this course we'll ask what it means to have a command of language—do animals have it? Infants? By examining the structures of the world's languages, we will discover why linguists believe in a “universal grammar” in spite of the world's rich linguistic diversity. We'll also learn how to make the sounds of the world's languages—from French nasal vowels to the clicks of Africa's Bantu languages.

This course is suited to anyone interested in language, how the mind works, or the characteristics that make us uniquely human.

3371.002 Linguistic Science

Dr. Aaron Braver
TR 11:00-12:20 PM
CRN: 33014
**Prerequisite: 3 hours of 2000-level English courses**

Description
Language touches every aspect of our lives. From reading the morning paper to decrypting secret codes, the subconscious knowledge of language is uniquely human. In this course we'll ask what it means to have a command of language—do animals have it? Infants? By examining the structures of the world's languages, we will discover why linguists believe in a “universal grammar” in spite of the world's rich linguistic diversity. We'll also learn how to make the sounds of the world's languages—from French nasal vowels to the clicks of Africa's Bantu languages.

This course is suited to anyone interested in language, how the mind works, or the characteristics that make us uniquely human.

3371.D02 Linguistic Science

Dr. Mary Jane Hurst
ONLINE W 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 33014
**Prerequisite: 3 hours of 2000-level English courses**

Description
This online offering of English 3371 will provide an introduction to the fascinating subject of linguistics, which is the study of language.  Our primary objective will be to learn what language is and how language systems work. 

No prior knowledge of linguistics will be needed for success in this class, as we will begin the semester with essential definitions and background information.  Next, we will compare and contrast human language with animal communication systems.  Most of the semester will then be devoted to exploring the primary components of human language – sounds, word forms, and syntactic structures – but we'll also take a look at other linguistic issues such as how languages change and how language is used to construct social identity.  Along the way, we'll talk about biological factors in language, theories of meaning, ethical concerns, endangered languages, and linguistic issues in the courts and in the news.  Students will also have opportunities for independent explorations into additional linguistic topics of their own choosing.

Students will be expected to:

  • complete listening, reading, and writing assignments each week;
  • access materials online through the library and through web links on Blackboard; and
  • participate in interactive discussions.

The two required books for the class are:

  • Clark, Virginia, Paul Eschholz, Alfred Rosa, and Beth Lee Simon. Language: Introductory Readings. 7th Edition. New York, NY: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2008. ISBN 9780312450182.
  • O'Grady, William, John Archibald, Mark Aronoff, and Janie Rees-Miller. Contemporary Linguistics: An Introduction. 6th Edition. New York, NY: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2010. ISBN 9780312555283.

Because this is an online course, students will need reliable Internet access, and students' computers must be configured to use the university's official online learning platform, Blackboard. (Guides can be found at www.Blackboard.ttu.edu, and personal assistance is available through IT Help Central.)  Students will also need Skype (a free program that can be downloaded from the internet) to communicate with their professor; students with older computers may need an external microphone in order to use Skype.

Anyone is welcome to enroll in this section of English 3371 who meets the basic prerequisites for an upper level English class.  This is an excellent course for students of all majors who wish to learn about language, for University Studies or General Studies students, for teacher certification students, linguistics minors, and, of course, English majors and minors of all kinds (that is, literature and language, creative writing, and/or technical communication students).

For more information about the class, please contact Dr. Hurst at maryjane.hurst@ttu.edu.  Before the semester begins, Dr. Hurst will e-mail welcome messages to all enrolled students, providing detailed information about how to get ready for and how to begin the class.

3382.001 Women Writers

Dr. Marjean Purinton
TR 11:00-12:20 PM
CRN: 37197

Description
A course called Women Writers appeared in university curricula during the 1980s, when the recovery of women's writing and women's voices was advanced by female faculty.  Now that women's writing has become integrated in almost every English course, there has been discussion about whether a course devoted exclusively to Women Writers needs to remain in the curriculum.  In response to cultural and curricular changes, some Women Writers courses have become highly specialized, Asian American Women Writers, Latina Writers, and Arab Women Writers, for example.  And so do we continue to need a “course of our own”? 

In light of these discussions, our course will examine the ways in which Women Writers, primarily Anglo-American and feminist, have influenced the canon and the ways we read literature written by women.  We will consider how women produced literature and how other women consumed those literary works.  We will think critically about the ways Women Writers affected women's lives with their transformational feminist texts.  We will trace the Women's Movement historically from its inception in representative writings from the First Wave (1790s) to today's Third-Wave issues.  We will read diverse genres—fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction—and interrogate how Women Writers appropriated and transformed the genres they inherited from men.  We will seek connections between what women write and what changes occur socially, politically, economically as advocated by activists in the Women's Movement. 

Because my own pedagogy and scholarship are informed by feminist theory, you will encounter de-centralized authority in this class, and you will be invited to active learning opportunities.  We will write short critical essays based on the primary texts.  We will write one extra-literary discovery paper.  We will integrate a limited number of secondary sources in a final paper, one that emanates from previous work on the primary-source essays and discovery paper.  We will also enjoy ample amounts of discussion and shared presentations. 

Among the literature of Women Writers for this course, you may encounter:

  • Mary Wollstonecraft's Maria; or, The Wrongs of Women
  • Christina Rossetti's “Goblin Market”
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman's “The Yellow Wall-paper”
  • Kate Chopin's “The Story of the Hour” and The Awakening
  • Susan Glaspell's Trifles
  • Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own
  • Lorriane Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun
  • Julia Alvarez's How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
  • Patricia Highsmith's The Price of Salt
  • Toni Morrison's Beloved
  • Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior
  • Jeanette Winterson's Written on the Body
  • Caitlin Moran's How to Be a Woman
  • Elizabeth Bishop's Poems

If you have any preferences or recommendations, please feel free to email me at marjean.purinton@ttu.edu.

3384.001 Religion and Literature: “Sin & Salvation in Western Protestantism”

Dr. Jennifer Snead
ONLINE R 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 37198
**Prerequisite: 3 hours of 2000-level English courses**

Description
How did Protestant writers think of sin and salvation in early modern, eighteenth, and nineteenth century England? In this class we'll trace some of the most important theological debates about sinning and being saved in Western Protestantism, through reading the works of devotional poets like George Herbert, Elizabeth Singer Rowe, Isaac Watts, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Christina Rossetti, and Gerard Manley Hopkins. We'll also read fiction: Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (1719), selections from Samuel Richardson's Clarissa (1748), James Hogg's Confessions of a Justified Sinner (1824), and Samuel Butler's The Way of All Flesh (1903). We'll also read brief examples of sermons and religious writings contemporary with these works. How do theological concerns affect writers' use of literary forms, conventions, and metaphors? How might reading and discussing how literature articulates these questions about sin in the past, help inform how we think about the ways that sin and salvation are represented in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries?

This course will be taught entirely online; students must have access to a reliable internet connection and be able to use Blackboard and Skype. Course requirements: attendance at weekly synchronous class discussions; weekly response papers; two longer papers; one final group project/presentation.

3385.001 Selected Plays of Shakespeare

Dr. Marliss Desens
MWF 9:00-9:50 AM
CRN: 13925

Description
TBA

3388.001 Film Genres: “Science Fiction”

Dr. Allison Whitney
TR 12:30-1:50 PM
CRN: 14001
**Prerequisite: 3 hours of 2000-level English courses**

Description
TBA

3388.002 Film Genres: “Science Fiction”

Dr. Allison Whitney
TR 2:00-3:20 PM
CRN: 13998
**Prerequisite: 3 hours of 2000-level English courses**

Description
TBA

3389.001 Short Story: “The Empire Strikes Back”

Dr. Roger McNamara
TR 12:30-1:50 PM
CRN: 33096

Description
This course focuses on three questions: what does it means to be “human,” what cultural practices qualify as “human,” and what consequences follow when certain human beings and cultures are considered “barbaric.” To explore the answers to these questions we will examine short stories written between the late nineteenth and late twentieth centuries across the world—from the British colonial empire to the people colonized in Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia (India and Pakistan). To enhance our appreciation of these stories we will study the historical and social backgrounds of these regions.

3389.002 Short Story

Dr. Roger McNamara
TR 2:00-3:20 PM
CRN: 37199

Description
TBA

3390.001 Literatures of the Southwest

Dr. Sara Spurgeon
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM
CRN: 35485

Description
TBA

3000-Level Course Descriptions

Technical Communication & Rhetoric
Unless otherwise noted, all 3000-level courses in TCR have a prerequisite of Junior standing.

3360.002: Issues in Composition: “Writing Fellows Practicum”

Dr. Susan Lang
T 5:00-7:50 PM
CRN: 31638

Description
TBA

3360.D01: Issues in Composition

Dr. Michael Faris
ONLINE W 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 35495

Description
This course will explore the implications of composing with and in new media. Together, we will explore what it means to compose in both digital and analog environments and the implications of shifts from traditional print literacies to new media literacies like social media, video, podcasts, and other multimedia. Students will gain practice in a variety of traditional and new media literacy activities and will survey issues related to the teaching and learning new media composition and the effects of new media in social and political contexts.

3365.001 Professional Report Writing

Dr. Amber Lancaster
MW 12:00-1:20 PM
CRN: 13674

Description
TBA

3365.004 Professional Report Writing

Dr. Rachel Wolford
TR 11:00-12:20 PM
CRN: 33983

Description
TBA

3365.007 Professional Report Writing

Dr. Rachel Wolford
TR 12:30-1:50 PM
CRN: 13701

Description
TBA

3365.009 Professional Report Writing

Dr. Kelli Cargile-Cook
TR 2:00-3:20 PM
CRN: 13680

Description
TBA

3365.010 Professional Report Writing

Dr. Kelli Cargile-Cook
MW 3:30-4:20 PM
CRN: 32527

Description
TBA

3365.D01 Professional Report Writing

Dr. Emil Towner
ONLINE W 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 36383

Description
TBA

3366.002 Style in Technical Writing

Dr. Amy Hanson
TR 3:30-4:50 PM
CRN: 13759

Description
Have you heard the saying "It's not what you say but how you say it"? In this course we're going to explore the "how you say it" elements of writing. We'll talk about the variety of styles of technical communication and how to adapt style to fit different aims, audiences, and media. We'll revise styles, talk about grammar, and learn to articulate valid arguments for revising others' writing. You will come out of this course a more confident writer and editor, armed with the tools you need to write, with style, in any situation.

3366. D01 Style in Technical Writing

Dr. Sean Zdenek
ONLINE M 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 32552

Description
TBA

3367.001 Usability Testing

Dr. Abigail Selzer King
TR 2:00-3:20 PM
CRN: 13775

Description
This applied research course will teach you the fundamentals of usability testing—research that aims to understand how actual users interact with websites, apps, products, and all modes of designed interface. The ability to apply these research strategies is highly sought after by employers and are an essential tool for up-and-coming entrepreneurs across industries.

We will spend part of our time over the course of the semester in a traditional classroom setting discussing research design and strategies. The other portion of the semester will be spent in Texas Tech's Usability Research Laboratory conducting and observing research-in-progress. By the end of the term, you will know how to:

  • Construct rigorous and valid usability test plans 

  • Evaluate users and develop accurate personas 

  • Apply heuristic evaluation, cognitive walkthrough, task analysis, think-aloud protocol 
(TAP), paper prototyping, and other relevant user experience evaluation tools 

  • Analyze usability test data in appropriate ways 

  • Work with a client to provide strategic recommendations for improved usability

3368.D01 World Wide Web Publishing of Technical Information

Dr. Craig Baehr
ONLINE R 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 35496

Description
TBA

4000-Level Course Descriptions

Literature/Creative Writing/Linguistics
Unless otherwise noted, all 4000-level courses in LCWL have a prerequisite of 6 hours of 3000-level English courses.

4301.001 Studies in Selected Authors: “Nabokov's American Novels”

Dr. John Samson
MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
CRN: 14706

Description
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the American novels of Vladimir Nabokov. The course will also help students develop their skills in literary interpretation and analysis: to determine what details in a text are significant, to find and develop topics from the text, and to write analytical essays. Our focus will be on Nabokov's conception that “For me a work of fiction exists only insofar as it affords me what I shall bluntly call aesthetic bliss, that is a sense of being somehow, somewhere, connected with other states of being where art (curiosity, tenderness, kindness, ecstasy) is the norm.” Texts: The Annotated Lolita; Pnin; Pale Fire; Ada, or Ardor; Transparent Things; and Look at the Harlequins! Students will: write three interpretive papers (4-5 pp. each) and a longer paper (8-10 pp.) incorporating interpretation and primary and/or secondary research.

4301.002 Studies in Selected Authors: "Lowell, Bishop, and Plath: The Nearly Confessional"

Dr. John Poch

W 6-8:50 PM

CRN 37997

Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, and Sylvia Plath all rose to be prominent poets in the late 50's through to the 70's and beyond. Bishop is not usually lumped in with the so-called "confessional" poets, but certainly she shares some affinities (and decades) with these other two poets. All three of them wrote highly personal poems that used their own experiences (especially familial relationships) to lay a foundation for their verse. While their departure from traditional formal structures towards more free verse lines perhaps is their greatest asset, we will see how strongly they rooted their poetry in the formal iambic pentameter line to shore up a beautiful music unlike anything that had come before them.

Required books:

Robert Lowell:
Lord Weary's Castle
For the Union Dead and Life Studies.

Sylvia Plath:
The Colossus
Ariel

Elizabeth Bishop:
Collected Poems

4311.001 Studies in Poetry: “Camelot and Gomorrah: The Poems of the Pearl Poet”

Dr. Julie Couch
TR 11:00-12:20 PM
CRN: 14724

Description
Dreams, Bible Stories, Romance! This course will introduce students to all four poems of the 14th-century manuscript called Cotton Nero A.x, the little, illustrated manuscript that contains the only copy of the famous romance, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. While the other poems in the manuscript are more overtly religious in nature— a dream vision of heaven, a retelling of Jonah and the whale, and, yes, a retelling of Sodom and Gomorrah—all four share complex poetic structure and are thought to be written by the same poet. In this course, we will read all four poems in translation alongside the original Middle English. We will analyze the poems and place them in their social context at the end of the fourteenth century, considering cultural concerns which underlie these narratives. We will also consider how the poet uses ideas of play and game to structure all four poems as well as how manuscript context (decorated initials, illustrations) shapes the reception of these remarkable poems. To that end, we will examine the digital facsimile of the Cotton Nero manuscript in order to consider the ways in which the poet engages with his or her reader on the manuscript page.

4312.001 Studies in Drama: “August Wilson's Twentieth Century”

Dr. Michael Borshuk
TR 9:30-10:50 AM
CRN: 33018

Description
With the staging of the 2005 drama Radio Golf, just months before his death, playwright August Wilson completed a monumental creative project more than two decades in the making: to compose a ten-play cycle narrating African American history and experience through each decade of the twentieth century. Through ten critically acclaimed dramas, Wilson had revisited one hundred years of black American life. This class will study August Wilson's twentieth century, examining his dramatization of historical concerns like slavery's complicated legacies; industrialization and the Great Migration; challenges to segregation and the emergence of the Civil Rights movement; and tensions over class difference within African American communities. We will be attentive to Wilson's recurring thematic and stylistic elements: his depiction of a broad collective history through the intimate, “local” examples of individual black families, for instance; or his ongoing representation of vernacular expression and cultural forms as redemptive amidst the challenges of twentieth-century history.

Students will be expected to keep an extensive and ongoing reading journal, from which they will choose three entries of 2-3 pages to be submitted for marks throughout the term. Students will also be required to make a brief oral presentation, and complete a research paper of 12-15 pages, to be handed in before classes end. Informed participation from all is expected and attendance is mandatory.

4313.001 Studies in Fiction: “Fiction and Politics in the 1790s”

Dr. Marta Kvande
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
CRN: 33097

Description
Britain in the 1790s was a hotbed of political fervor, controversy, and paranoia. While some Britons eagerly celebrated the French Revolution and hoped it would spread to Britain, many others eyed it with terror and anxiety, fearing that it would produce upheaval and chaos in Britain. Political engagement was intense; many joined political societies (some of which openly called for revolution). The government passed the infamous “Two Acts” designed to restrict public meetings and public discussion (the Seditious Meetings Act and the Treason Act), and radical activists (like Thomas Paine) were tried on charges of treason. This was fertile ground for fiction of all kinds, especially political fictions. We'll study the novels produced in English during this time and consider how they relate to and respond to their contexts. Readings may include Robert Bage's Hermsprong, Eliza Fenwick's Secrecy, William Godwin's Caleb Williams, Thomas Holcroft's Anna St. Ives, Elizabeth Inchbald's Nature and Art, Matthew Lewis's The Monk, Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho (or The Italian), and Mary Wollstonecraft's Maria.

Course Requirements
A shorter paper, a presentation, an annotated bibliography, a longer research paper.

4351.001 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

Dr. Katie Cortese
M 3:00-5:50 PM
CRN: 14773

Description
TBA

4351.002 Advanced Creative Writing: Non-Fiction

Dr. Jaqueline Kolosov-Wenthe
TR 9:30-10:50 AM
CRN: 14784

Description
TBA

4373.001 Studies in Linguistics: “Typology”

Dr. Min-Joo Kim
TR 11:00-12:20 PM
CRN: 14815

Description
This course offers an introduction to linguistic typology and language universals. Questions to be addressed include but will not be limited to:

(a) How are languages of the world similar to and different from each other?
(b) What are the factors that shape up the syntactic structures of the world's languages?
(c) Do structural differences between languages impact how speakers of different languages package information?

In addition, students will be learning about both macro-level and micro-level approaches to language as well as descriptive and theoretical analyses of linguistic data. Students who have little or no background in linguistics are welcome, not to mention linguistically-oriented students.

4000-Level Course Descriptions

Technical Communication & Rhetoric
Unless otherwise noted, all 4000-level courses in TCR have a prerequisite of 6 hours of 3000-level English courses

4360.001 Studies in Composition

Dr. Rich Rice
M 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 14790

Description
TBA

4360.D01 Studies in Composition

Dr. Rich Rice
ONLINE M 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 37084

Description
TBA

4366.001 Technical and Professional Editing

Dr. Angela Eaton
W 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 21740

Description
TBA

4366.D01 Technical and Professional Editing

Dr. Angela Eaton
ONLINE W 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 21740

Description
TBA

4367.001 Developing Instructional Materials

Dr. Craig Baehr
TR 11:00-12:20 PM
CRN: 37083

Description
TBA

4378.027 Internship in Technical Communication

Dr. Kelli Cargile-Cook
Time: TBA
CRN: 14843

Description
TBA

4380.001 Professional Issues in Technical Communication

Dr. Kristen Moore
R 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 37086

Description
English 4380 is the capstone course to the Technical Communication major. The course aims to bridge your work as a student with your work as a professional Technical Communicator. As such, you'll be asked to demonstrate and refine your skills as an agile communicator across a range of contexts, genres, and media. You will further develop your skillset as well, developing new competencies and learning how to best brand and package your abilities as a professional and technical communicator for future employers.

This course will ask you to build skills in new areas like social media analytics, data visualization, global technical communication, and community advocacy. Engaging with these skills will sharpen other existing competencies in field and bibliographic research, information design, usability, written communication, and oral communication.

You will work on three major projects:

  • Agility in Workplace Competency Project
  • Self-Directed Research Project
  • Professional Profile Project

4380. D01 Professional Issues in Technical Communication

Dr. Kristen Moore
ONLINE R 6:00-8:50 PM
CRN: 35499

Description
English 4380 is the capstone course to the Technical Communication major. The course aims to bridge your work as a student with your work as a professional Technical Communicator. As such, you'll be asked to demonstrate and refine your skills as an agile communicator across a range of contexts, genres, and media. You will further develop your skillset as well, developing new competencies and learning how to best brand and package your abilities as a professional and technical communicator for future employers.

This course will ask you to build skills in new areas like social media analytics, data visualization, global technical communication, and community advocacy. Engaging with these skills will sharpen other existing competencies in field and bibliographic research, information design, usability, written communication, and oral communication.

You will work on three major projects:

  • Agility in Workplace Competency Project
  • Self-Directed Research Project
  • Professional Profile Project

LCWL

TCR

Contact

Eleanor Mode
Undergraduate Advisor
ENG/PHIL Rm. 211C
806.834.8986
Office Hours