Texas Tech University

Research Spotlight on Women Faculty: Su Shin & Jingyu Lin

March 6, 2020 |  

During March, Texas Tech is celebrating women faculty who exemplify excellence in research, scholarship, creative activity, teaching, and mentoring.

Su Shin
Associate Professor; ADM Program Director; Associate Chairperson; Department of Design

Su Shin

Shin's expertise is in textiles, apparel manufacturing, and statistical analysis of anthropometry data, qualitative data analysis, human factors, sizing systems, 3D body scan, 3D virtual design, fit assessment, and therapeutic clothing for special populations, including children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, and the elderly with Alzheimer's diseases.

What inspired you to work in your field/area of expertise?

Clothing fit, size issues and the needs of technology in the apparel industry inspired me to work in my area of expertise in sizing systems, fit assessment with 3D body scan technology for large population 3D body scan (e.g. Size North America and Size USA national sizing studies), customization with 3D virtual fitting technology, pattern design systems and clothing development for various populations (e.g. therapeutic clothing for children with Autism and individuals with Alzheimer's disease, and uniform design for women working in the oil company).

Who inspired you to pursue academia?

My late mother. It was always her wish for me to pursue an academic career from my childhood. For academia, while I was in NC State, my Ph.D. advisor, Dr. Cynthia Istook, inspired me to pursue academia, working closely with the textiles and apparel industry. Dr. Sharran Parkinson inspires me to continue on.

What would you tell your female students interested in pursuing an academic career?

I would recommend an academic career for anyone who is interested. Be persistent: It might take long time to pursue an academic career. Sometimes, events in life might be different or difficult while pursuing. Don't give up any dream. Be creative: You would find endless interesting subjects to explore. This career is a great opportunity to do research, teaching and service in academia.

 filigree

Jingyu Lin
Horn Professor; Linda F. Whitacre Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering; Co-Director of Nano-Photonics Center; Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

Kristin HutchinsLin's research interests include semiconductors, photonics, optoelectronics, radiation sensors, solid−state lighting, and energy−conversion devices.

What inspired you to work in your field/area of expertise?

I grew up in China. Back then, there was no second thought for majoring in a discipline other than math, physics, or chemistry. Among these three disciplines, I found physics was most interesting because of its ability to describe physical phenomena in simple and beautiful equations. Before coming to TTU, I was a Physics Professor at Kansas State University. My research is devoted to the advancements of wide bandgap semiconductor materials and devices with emphasize on developing technologically significant applications.

Who inspired you to pursue academia?

I met my husband (Prof. Hongxing Jiang) during the 1980s in Prof. Arnold Honig's lab at Syracuse University. I was Prof. Honig's first female student and he believed in me and told me that we can handle anything after going through his lab, including careers in academia. His excitement over science and love for his students were contagious and inspiring.

What would you tell your female students interested in pursuing an academic career?

I said this on Women in Optics Calendar – SPIE (2016-2017) and will repeat this again. A career in STEM is very challenging, but rewarding because you really get to see beautiful results a few times or many times in your lifetime and your work could have a long lasting impact. You could balance an academic career and family by learning to be an effective team player in your work place/family, resilient to rejections and intimidation, believing in yourself, and persistent.

 

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