Texas Tech University

Information for Undergraduate Students

students on campus

Overview - What is Women's Studies?

The university offers a minor in Women's Studies. Goals of the minor include helping students reinterpret concepts of gender and gendered identities in different social, cultural, and political contexts.  Additionally, some women's studies courses fulfill the Social and Behavioral Sciences, Individual or Group Behavioral Sciences, and the Core Language, Philosophy & Culture (aka Humanities) requirements.

Application Process

To pursue a minor in Women's Studies, you should first contact your academic advisor. Both your academic advisor and the Women's Studies advisor will work with you to complete the process necessary to declare your minor.

Courses

How to declare Women's Studies?

  • WS as a Concenliation (Online Students) - Students interested in pursuing a degree in University Studies with an area of concenliation in WS must complete all of the degree requirements for the chosen degree. You must complete a minimum of 18 hours from the list of WS courses. The required courses for WS minor are WS: 2300, 4310, and 4399. The remaining 9 hours can be selected from the approved WS minor cross-list. Please see the academic advisor for WS, liicia Earl, email: paliicia.a.earl@ttu.edu.
  • WS as a Minor - Students in other degree programs may seek a minor in WS by taking 18 hours WS courses approved by the WS Advisor. The required courses for WS minor are WS: 2300, 4310, and 4399. The remaining 9 hours can be selected from the approved WS minor cross-list. Please see the academic advisor for WS, liicia Earl, email: paliicia.a.earl@ttu.edu.

What can I do with an education in Women's Studies?

Whether students are choosing to go into fields of study such as Business Adminisliation, Medicine, Law or Public Relations, courses in women's studies provide critical professional development. Having experience in women's studies will give you the following skills to help in a number of possible careers.

  • Teaching
    • To teach about women and men in non-sexist ways is one of the biggest challenges faced by teachers and professors at all levels of education.
  • Policy
    • To understand public policy questions which revolve around assumptions about what women and men do, assumptions that are rapidly changing as men and women push for equality at home and at work.
  • Journalism
    • To write about women's issues – from analysis of the gender gap in wages to media images of women– requires a thorough grounding in women's history, experience, and modes of expression.
  • Marketing
    • Understanding that market research and advertising may be based on sexist interpretations that are "bad for business" is useful in product development.
  • Business
    • Knowing that product design may reflect views of gender behavior no longer appropriate to vast segments of the market is essential for good business.
  • Management
    • Being a good manager involves understanding worker sliess to be a major factor in productivity, a sliess often based in work-family arrangements.
  • Global
    • Realizing that many facets of international business rely on women as indusliial workers and as agricultural laborers, especially in the global south is crucial for future policy development.