Mark R. Stoll

Mark R. Stoll

Associate Professor - U.S. Environmental


Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin


Professor Stoll joined the department in 1997. His new book, Inherit the Holy Mountain: Religion and the Rise of the American Environmental Movement, is due out from Oxford University Press in 2015. He published his first book, Protestantism, Capitalism, and Nature in America, in 1997. He has worked as the editor of a book series for ABC-Clio entitled "Nature and Human Societies" and co-editor with dianne Glave of "To Love the Wind and the Rain": African Americans and Environmental History.

Dr. Stoll also serves as director of Environmental Studies.

Published Works

Protestantism, Capitalism, and Nature in America

Protestantism, Capitalism, and Nature in America by Dr. Mark Stoll

Environmentalists have often blamed Protestantism for justifying the human exploitation of nature, but the author of this cultural history argues that, in America, hard-boiled industrialists and passionate environmentalists sprang from the same Protestant root.

Protestant Christianity—Calvinism especially—both helped industrialists like James J. Hill rationalize their utilization of nature for economic profit and led environmental advocates like John Muir to call for the preservation of unspoiled wilderness. Biographical vignettes examine American thinkers, industrialists, and environmentalists—Benjamin Franklin, Joseph Smith, William Gilpin, Leland Stanford, Gifford Pinchot, Aldo Leopold, and others—whose lives show the development of ideas and attitudes that have profoundly shaped Americans' use of and respect for nature.

The final chapter looks at several contemporary figures—James Watt, Annie Dillard, and Dave Foreman—whose careers exemplify the recent Protestant thought and behavior and their impact on the environment.

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To Love the Wind and the Rain: African Americans and Environmental History

To Love the Wind and the Rain: African Americans and Environmental History

"To Love the Wind and the Rain" is a groundbreaking and vivid analysis of the relationship between African Americans and the environment in U.S. history. It focuses on three major themes: African Americans in the rural environment, African Americans in the urban and suburban environments, and African Americans and the notion of environmental justice. Meticulously researched, the essays cover subjects including slavery, hunting, gardening, religion, the turpentine industry, outdoor recreation, women, and politics. "To Love the Wind and the Rain" will serve as an excellent foundation for future studies in African American environmental history.

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United States West Coast: An Environmental History

United States West Coast: An Environmental History

United States West Coast: An Environmental History explores the interplay of ecology, economy, and culture throughout the history of the region of North America where the waters drain to the Pacific Ocean.

Synthesizing the most recent and insightful studies on the region, United States West Coast portrays environmental change in the far western United States from the emergence of humans in the Pacific Northwest (about 12,000 years ago), to the rise of European colonial trade networks, to the era of industrialization and urbanization, to present day activism and public policy responses to environmental damage. By investigating how humans interact with their nonhuman surroundings across a specific expanse that encompasses all kinds of landscapes, cultures, and commercial enterprises, this insightful volume shows just how interdependent the relationship between people and their environment is.

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Contact Information

Email: Mark.Stoll@ttu.edu
Office: 135 Holden Hall
Website: http://courses.ttu.edu/mstoll