Texas Tech University

Legacy of a Thousand Stitches

January 15 – May 15

Quilt exhibition quilt 1Crossed Tulips Quilt, Creator unknown, Circa 1860, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Burford W. Williams

From early chintz quilts to rare doll quilts this exhibit features more than 40 spectacular antique quilts from the Museum of Texas Tech's collection. Among the quilts featured is a signed and dated 1839 Medallion Quilt of chintz. The exhibition also will feature six never before exhibited doll quilts. It is rare for doll quilts to survive because they were toys often made from household sewing scraps, sometimes by a child.

Selected from almost 300 quilts in the collection this exhibition features the best and most interesting quilts in the collection. The quilts have been selected based on their artistic appeal and story. Many of the beautiful quilts were made by an unknown creator and in many cases this may be the only legacy the quilter left behind. Where the maker of the quilt is known her photos and stories will be shared.

This first major exhibition of the Museum's quilts in recent years will be accompanied by an exhibition catalog featuring images of each of the quilts on exhibit along with another 50 not on display due to space constraints. The catalog will be available through the Museum Store and can be ordered over the phone at (806) 742-2436.

Quilt exhibition quilt 2Sunburst Quilt, Createdby Sally Beaird Lewellin, Circa 1885, Gift of Jacquelyn (Jackie) K. Reis (Mrs. Tony)

Accompanying this exhibition is a collection from the Caprock Studio Art Quilters. On display from Feb. 9 through April 4, the exhibition represents a regional group who create original works of art through the medium of quilting and other fiber arts techniques, such as embroidery, fabric dyeing, printing and surface design, and beading. Many of the members have won awards at the Houston International Quilt Festival, the Ogallala Quilt Festival, and the annual Lubbock Arts Festival. Their works have also been featured in books and magazines.

For more information, contact Dr. Marian Ann Montgomery, curator of clothing and textiles, at (806) 742-2490 or marian.ann.montgomery@ttu.edu.

Quilt exhibition catalog cover

Legacy of a Thousand Stitches
Exhibition-Related Events

Trunk Show and Presentation
  • February 11
    6-8:30 p.m.
    Helen DeVitt Jones Sculpture Court and Auditorium
    Free to the public

Katie Pasquini Masopust, international artist, quilter, author and teacher, will present a lecture and trunk show of her work, current quilt making trends and accomplished artists with whom she has worked. Reception begins at 6 p.m., presentation at 7 p.m. This event is co-sponsored by the Caprock Art Quilters, the Museum of Texas Tech University Association and Bernina Sewing Studio. 

Quilt Workshop
  • February 11 and 12
    8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
    $185 registration fee

Katie Pasquini Masopust, international artist, quilter, author and teacher, will talk about quilt composition and value. Preregistration required. Limit 25 people. For further information contact Jean Grimes at (806) 797-6682. 

Saturdays at the Museum: Quilts
  • February 20
    1 - 4 p.m.
    New Assembly room in the museum
    Free to the public

Learn the art of quilt making in this no sewing quilt blocking activity. 

Movie at the Museum: A Century of Quilts: America in Cloth
  • February 24
    1:30-2 p.m.
    Helen DeVitt Jones Auditorium
    Free to the public

This documentary celebrates the art of quilting by featuring selections from the best 100 American quilts of the 20th century the stories behind their creation, and the quilters as they work. The program travels across America to capture the artists at work in their studios and homes and tells the stories behind the creation of these treasures. 60 minutes. 

Come and See
  • March 24
    10:30 – noon
    Helen DeVitt Jones Auditorium
    Free to the public

  • March 26
    10:30 – noon
    Helen DeVitt Jones Auditorium
    Free to the public

Dr. Marian Ann Montgomery, Curator of Clothing and Textiles, will show and discuss 20-30 pieces from the Museum's collection of clothing, accessories, needlework, and quilts. To RSVP, contact Dr. Marian Ann Montgomery, curator of clothing and textiles, at marian.ann.montgomery@ttu.edu.

Movie at the Museum: The Great Quilt Revival
  • March 30
    1:30-2:30 p.m.
    Helen DeVitt Jones Auditorium
    Free to the public

The Great American Quilt Revival is the story of how quilts came to be recognized as works of art and how the craft of quilting has exploded into popular culture. Notable quilter, Georgia Bonesteel, and many of today's well known quilters, historians and collectors discuss their art and their role in the revolution of modern quilting. From early quilting innovator Marie Webster, to the work and influence of the Amish and African-American traditions, to the overwhelming response of quilts mourning the 9/11 tragedies, The Great American Quilt Revival captures the story of this landmark movement.

Bed Turning
  • April 7
    7-9 p.m.
    Helen DeVitt Jones Auditorium
    $5 registration fee

The 53 quilts featured in the exhibition catalog, but not on display can be seen during a bed-turning at which all the quilts will be stacked on a few tables and after being discussed will be turned back to reveal the next quilt. Quilts that will be shown that evening include the famous Susan Robb quilt—the only surviving quilt that records the Confederate sympathies from the Civil War, which will have just returned from a special exhibit on the impact of the Civil War on the West at the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles. 

Quilt Documentation Day
  • April 9
    10:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
    Helen DeVitt Jones Auditorium
    Free to the public

  • May 14
    10:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
    Helen DeVitt Jones Auditorium
    Free to the public

The public is invited to bring up to four of their quilts to be documented by the museum's Curator of Clothing and Textiles Marian Ann J. Montgomery. Dr. Montgomery will discuss with the owner the family history and the date the quilt was made as well as giving the pattern name. The quilt will be photographed and the owner will go home with a written documentation and photograph of the quilt to place with it for future generations. An appraisal of the object will NOT be given.