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Philosophy Talks 2013-14

Fall 2014 Speaker Series

Jonathan Dorsey, Texas Tech University

Department Colloquium: Four conceptions of the hard problem of consciousness

Wednesday, September 24, 4:00 pm

Eng/Phil 264

Abstract: Though widely discussed, the hard problem of consciousness is surprisingly difficult to pin down. In fact, one may see that not just a couple of plausible conceptions of the problem exist but rather four do. After providing some background for the hard problem, I present and clarify these four conceptions of it. I close by providing some considerations for and against each of the four conceptions without passing final judgment on any of them.

 

James Weatherall, Associate Professor, U.C. Irvine LPS

Physics Lecture: The Physics of Wall Street

Thursday, November 20

Location: TBA

Abstract: I will discuss how three mathematical physicists contributed to the development of the first mathematical model for pricing options contracts, and how one of them used a strategy based on the model to start the first modern quantitative hedge fund. I will then discuss how work by Benoit Mandelbrot, presented very early in the history of options pricing, revealed a way in which one of the central assumptions underlying this model could fail. I will conclude by discussing what this example reveals about physicists' contributions to finance.

 

James Weatherall, Associate Professor, U.C. Irvine LPS

Department Colloquium: Inertial Motion, Explanation, and the Foundations of Classical Space-time Theories

Friday, November 21, 4:00 pm

Eng/Phil 264

Abstract: There is an influential view in physics and philosophy of physics, originating with Einstein and Eddington, that holds that general relativity is distinctive in the history of physics because it can be used to "explain" inertial, or unforced, motion. In this talk, I will describe how a reformulation of Newtonian gravitation may be used to provide insight into claims concerning the (allegedly) distinctive explanatory resources of relativity theory. I will then argue that Newtonian gravitation can be understood to explain inertial motion in much the same way as general relativity. However, a careful comparative study of the status of inertial motion in the two theories reveals that neither explanation is as clean or straightforward as adherents to the view noted above believe. I will conclude by presenting a view about the interdependencies of the central principle of physical theories that I will argue provides some insight into a sense in which inertial motion is explained in both of these theories.

 

Spring 2015 Speaker Series

Pamela Hieronymi, Professor, UCLA

Public Lecture: TBA

Thursday, February 12

Location: TBA

Abstract: TBA

 

Pamela Hieronymi, Professor, UCLA

Department Colloquium: TBA

Friday, February 13, 4:00 pm

Eng/Phil 264

Abstract: TBA