Texas Tech University

Brown Bags and Talks

CFAS conference room

The Center for Addiction Recovery Research hosts a series of brown bag sessions, which are exciting and insightful learning activities aimed at providing opportunities for open conversations, idea sharing, and collaborative reflections on the essential and foundational aspects of addiction recovery research. It caters to new graduate students and prepares emerging researchers for the rigorous and meaningful journey of graduate-level research and scholarship.
 
During fall 2021, we have the following sessions on TUESDAYS, 12:45 pm – 1:45 pm in the CFAS Conference Room: 

Life begins at PhD: Career trajectories Post-PhD (August 24th)
Resource Person: Dr. Antover Tuliao
This short seminar discusses the possible career trajectories post-PhD. Industries covered in the discussion include academia and research institutions (from research-intensive universities, liberal arts colleges, medical-teaching universities, and research centers), government and non-governmental organizations, policy-making bodies and "think tanks", and clinical practice. Presenters will discuss the baseline requirements for entering these industries with a Ph.D. degree and what skills and accomplishments are needed to be marketable in these industries.

From Master's to PhD:  What do you focus on during the journey? (August 31st)
Resource Person: Dr. Devin Mills
This short seminar discusses how graduate school changes from the master's level to the Ph.D. level.  We will discuss general expectations of the program and research advisors, and the importance of engaging with your advisor early on in your studies.  We will also discuss the transition from a "mentor/mentee" relationship to a colleague relationship with your advisor.  Finally, we will discuss the importance of managing the expectations you may place on yourself and the importance of self-care
 
Science, Replication, and Generalizability (September 7th)
Resource Person: Dr. Eugene Wang
Since 2010, psychology has been in a "replication crisis."  This short seminar introduces students to this current crisis, contributing factors, and possible solutions.
 
Publish or Perish: The Peer Review Process (September 14th)
Resource Person: Dr. Antover Tuliao
This short seminar introduces graduate students to the process of peer review, from tips on picking a journal outlet that would fit the manuscript, the peer review process, authorship, to having the manuscript accepted and being in press. Other faculty members will also be present to share their thoughts and experiences on submitting manuscripts for publication.
 
The Scientist-Practitioner Model (September 21st)
Resource Person: Dr. Eugene Wang
This short seminar discusses the Scientist-Practitioner model and proposes how to operationalize what it means to be a "Scientist-Practitioner."
 
How to: Read a Journal Article using Meta-Reading (September 28th)
Resource Person: Dr. Antover Tuliao
This short seminar introduces graduate students to the concept and skill of meta-reading journal articles. This hands-on seminar helps students to dissect a journal article. But rather than focusing on what the author is "saying", students will be taught how to focus on what the author is "doing". Skills taught in this seminar will help the students not only be better readers, but also teach students how to be better writers of publishable scientific manuscripts and how to be better peer reviewers.
 
How to: Do a Literature Review (October 5th)
Resource Person: Dr. Antover Tuliao
This short seminar is a continuation of the How-To: Meta-Reading seminar. This seminar provides graduate students with tips on how to perform a literature review for their own research and in preparation for a dissertation. Different types and purposes of literature review will be briefly discussed, followed by tips on how to aggregate and synthesize copious amounts of information.
 
Cognitive Biases (October 12th)
Resource Person: Dr. Eugene Wang
This short seminar introduces students to the work of Kahneman and Tversky, who won a Nobel Prize in behavioral economics for their work identifying and cataloging cognitive biases, and how cognitive biases affect translating research into practice.
 
How to: Do Peer Reviewing (October 19th)
Resource Person: Dr. Antover Tuliao
This seminar provides students with an introduction to how to do a peer review of scholarly manuscripts. The seminar will start with a brief review of the peer review process, followed by the anatomy of a review, and finally discussing what to look for in the various parts of a scholarly manuscript.
 
Meehl's Prediction Procedures (October 26th)
Resource Person: Dr. Eugene Wang
This short seminar introduces students to the work of Paul Meehl, who has published about the controversy between statistical and clinical methods to predict human performance and wrote a landmark book in 1954 about the topic.
 
How to: Develop a Research Question (November 2nd)
Resource Person: Dr. Antover Tuliao
This seminar provides graduate students tips on how to start, craft, and develop their research questions and research agenda. Faculty present will give their own processes in how they develop their own research agenda and questions.
 
"Just what do clients REALLY look for when searching for a therapist": Information Acquisition in Therapist Search and Selection (November 9th)
Resource Person: Dr. Antover Tuliao
  
What toys can you play around with at the Center for Addiction Recovery Research (CARR)? (November 16th)
Resource Person: Nephtaly Joel Botor



Should you have any queries regarding the Brownbag Sessions or if you have suggestions about topics that will be helpful to emerging scholars like you, feel free to email us at hs.carr@ttu.edu.