Texas Tech University

Medieval & Renaissance Studies Center

MRSC header
The “Bull of Quivira” (one of the Plains “cities of gold”), woodcut of a bison by Christoffel Jegher [1569-1652]

Texas Tech University, although established in 1923, is rooted in the middle ages and the Renaissance. This is true of the abstract ideals of the university and of its arts curricula. It is also true of the campus architecture, a Spanish Renaissance theme based ultimately upon the Administration Building's recapitulation of the plateresque style of the Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, built in 1553. It is literally true of the earliest European presence here on the High Plains, where the expedition of Francisco Vázquez de Coronado left behind chain mail, crossbow bolts, and vellones minted during the reign of Enrique IV of Castille (1454-75), perhaps the oldest circulating coins ever discovered in U.S. territory.

The Medieval and Renaissance Studies Center (MRSC) is dedicated to the advancement of Medieval and Renaissance studies at Texas Tech, in the State of Texas, and in the lands beyond. It currently supervises a graduate certificate program in medieval and Renaissance studies, provides some conference participation support for students working in these areas, and sponsors guest lectures and other activities related to medieval and Renaissance studies. Whereas traditional academic programs are organized to support their own specific perspectives and programs, the Center seeks to unite faculty and students interested in medieval and Renaissance area studies that transcend disciplinary boundaries. It seeks is to enhance campus, state, and national knowledge about Texas Tech programs already in place. The Center, approved in 2011, is located administratively within the College of Arts and Sciences but is also funded in part by the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

Announcements

The cornerstone course for the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Certificate, MRST 5301, will be offered in the Spring on 2020 on Thursday evenings, from 6-8:50pm, taught by Dr. Jacob Baum, in Holden Hall 109. If you are working toward the MRST certificate and have not taken MRST 5301 yet, or if you are simply interested in taking a course that provides a multidisciplinary introduction and overview to the field of Medieval Studies, please factor this into your registration plans for Spring Semester!

The TTU Medieval and Renaissance Studies Center would like to take special note of the publication of 𝘙𝘦𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘚𝘦𝘯𝘴𝘦𝘴: 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘗𝘢𝘳𝘢𝘥𝘰𝘹 𝘰𝘧 𝘙𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘨𝘪𝘰𝘶𝘴 𝘉𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘧 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘗𝘳𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘤𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘎𝘦𝘳𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘺, authored by our affiliated faculty and Board member Dr. Jacob M. Baum (Assistant Professor, Department of History), and published by the University of Illinois Press (2018). Congrats to Dr. Baum!

Texas Tech University has awarded the First Place Faculty Book Award for 2018-19 to a medieval studies book by Dr. Angela Mariani (Music)

Upcoming Events

The next International Congress on Medieval Studies will be held 7-10 May 2020 in Kalamazoo, MI. We will update the program when it is released. More information can be found at https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/call.

International Medieval Sermon Studies Society Call for Papers: The conference will take place in beautiful Prague, 23-25 April 2020. The conference, organized by Lucie Doležalová and Marjorie Burghart, focuses on "distinctions" in the context of medieval preaching. For more information see https://distinguo.hypotheses.org/10or contact marjorie.burghart@free.fr

Past Events

The TEMA 2019 conference was held at Texas State University in San Marcos, TX, 18-19 October 2019. For the program see https://www.texasmedieval.net/

South Central Renaissance Conference (SCRC) 2019 at TTU hosted by Dr. Brian Steele (School of Art, TCVPA Associate Dean)

Exhibit on "Pre-Modern Bibles"

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