Texas Tech University

Classics Events

Spring 2020

The Archaeological Institute of America - Lubbock branch presents:
Late Roman Galilee: The Preliminary Results of the Huqoq Excavation Project - Dr. Daniel Schindler
When: Thursday, January 30th, 5:30pm
Location: BIOL 101
Description: A lecture by Dr. Daniel Schindler, Instructor of Classics, Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures, Texas Tech University.

The Archaeological Institute of America - Lubbock branch presents:
Taking to the Water: New Evidence and New Debates about the Earliest Seafaring in the World - Dr. John Cherry
When: Thursday, February 27th, 5:30pm
Location: BIOL 101
Description: A lecture by Dr. John Cherry, Joukowsky Family Professor of Archaeology and Classics, the Joukowsky Institute at Brown University. Dr. Cherry writes: "Until quite recently, archaeologists have supposed that the seas and oceans represented a barrier to human dispersal, and that islands were among the last places on earth to be colonized by people, only fairly recently, as part of the worldwide spread of modern humans. But is that picture still correct? Startling new data have come to light just in the last few years, in parts of the Mediterranean and in island Southeast Asia, that have been claimed as evidence for a far longer antiquity for seafaring, reaching back hundreds of thousands, and perhaps as much as a million years. Naturally, these claims have attracted widespread attention and much discussion — and not only among archaeologists. | This lecture outlines what we know, with reasonable certainty, about patterns of global maritime dispersal in the past few tens of thousands of years, before turning to present the new evidence and its strengths and weaknesses. In trying to understand it, we will need to consider information (amongst other things) from ethnographic analogy, experimental seafaring, and our current knowledge of the relative configurations of land and sea over the course of the Pleistocene era. Some of the bold assertions made in the past few years require more supporting data before they can be accepted. That cautious conclusion does not detract from the excitement and importance of this fast-moving field of research in archaeology."
Co-Sponsored by the Humanities Center, the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, the Department of History, and the Department of Anthropology, Sociology, and Social Work.

The Classics Research Forum
When: Wednesday, March 4th, 5-6:20 pm
Location: Qualia Room, CMLL Building
Description: presentations of research in Classics and related topics:
Yesenia Brambila, Classics MA Program, "Where do the dead go? Places of the Afterlife in Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, 151-215".
Joshua Kulseth, English/Creative Writing (Poetry) PhD Program, "Place Matters: the temporal and spatial linguistics of Michael Longley's The Stairwell".
For more information, please contact Dr. David Larmour.

The Classics Research Forum: Satirical Bodies
When: Wednesday, March 11th, 5-6:30 pm
Location: Qualia Room, CMLL Building
Description: Presentations of research in Classics and related topics:
Maurice Gonzales, Classics MA Program, " Juvenal's Odysseus: The "Correct" Way to Satirize Stoics".
Prof. Matthew Hunter, Dept. of English, TTU, " Bodies Public: Satire, Style, and Vicarious Relations in Early Modern England".
For more information, please contact Dr. David Larmour.

The Archaeological Institute of America - Lubbock branch presents:
An Uncaptured Sardinia? Mobility and Connectivity the Coastal and Inland Landscapes of Ancient West-Central Sardinia - Dr. Linda Gosner
When: Thursday, March 12th, 5:30pm
Location: BIOL 101
Description: A lecture by Dr. Linda Gosner, Assistant Professor and Postdoctoral Scholar, Michigan Society of Fellows, University of Michigan.

Physicians and Medical Practice in the Roman Empire - Dr. Molly Jones-Lewis
When: Thursday, April 2nd, Time TBA
Location: TBA
Description: A lecture by Dr. Molly Jones-Lewis, Lecturer, Department of Ancient Studies, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Dr. Jones-Lewis writes: "If you lived in the Roman empire and needed medical care, what would your options look like? If you were an ancient physician, how would you go about building a practice and gaining your patients' trust? How would your ethnicity, gender, and social class impact your career in a highly competitive medical marketplace? This talk will discuss the ways in which ancient people (including women) pursued a medical career and the role that patronage and slavery played in laying the foundations of modern medical risk management. We will also discuss how Roman law and policy impacted the working conditions, protections, and liabilities of physicians."

Arachne's Threads: Spinning and Fiber in the Ancient Mediterranean - Dr. Molly Jones-Lewis
When: Friday, April 3rd, Time TBA
Location: TBA
Description: A demonstration by Dr. Molly Jones-Lewis, Lecturer, Department of Ancient Studies, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Dr. Jones-Lewis writes: "We wear them everyday; thousands of threads knotted and woven together by machines, a process removed from our lives and surroundings. But before the Industrial Revolution, spinning was a ubiquitous activity and fabric production was a major part of household economies. Spinning tools and techniques are central to understanding ancient lives, and spinning literacy is a valuable aid to appreciating ancient literature. This demo focuses on the way that wool and flax fibers were spun in the Roman empire using a reproduction spindle and distaff. We will also explore the ways that artistic and literary evidence can be used to reconstruct ancient spinning practices through experimental archaeology."

"Make yourself a Hercules": Antiquity, Modernity, and Physical Culture - Dr. Peter Miller
When: Thursday, April 16th, 5pm
Location: CMLL 105
Description: A lecture by Dr. Peter Miller, Assistant Professor of Classics, Department of Classics, University of Winnipeg.

Title TBA - Dr. Peter Miller
When: Friday, April 17th, Time TBA
Location: TBA
Description: A research talk for Classics by Dr. Peter Miller, Assistant Professor of Classics, Department of Classics, University of Winnipeg.

TTU Classics Day
When: TBA
Location: TBA
Description: TTU Classics hosts local high schools for a day of Greek and Roman culture, crafts, games, and more! For more information, please contact Dr. William Tortorelli.

TTU Classical Society Movie Nights
TBA

For our graduate workshop series, please see the graduate workshop page.

More events and information to follow.

Classical Language & Literature Studies

  • Address

    CMLL Building, 2906 18th St, Lubbock, TX 79409
  • Phone

    806.742.3145