Texas Tech University

Michael D. Noel, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Economics

Email: michael.noel@ttu.edu

Phone: 806.834.6342

Faculty Office: 237 Holden Hall

Texas Tech University
Lubbock, Texas 79409-1014


Link to Dr. Noel's web page.

Michael

Education

Ph.D., Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , 2002
M.A., Economics, 1997
Hon.B.Sc., Economics, Statistics & Computer Science, High Distinction, 1996 (Gold Medal Recipient)

Research Interests

  • Industrial Organization
  • Antitrust
  • Energy Economics
  • Oil & Gas
  • Pricing
  • Strategy

Courses Offered

ECO 5348 Semiar in Empirical Ind. Org.
ECO 3325 Special Topics: Antitrust and Regulations

Selected Publications

Noel, Michael D. and Schankerman, Mark (forthcoming). “Strategic Patenting and Software Innovation”, Journal of Industrial Economics. 

Noel, Michael D. (2013). “The 2012 Abuse of Dominance Guidelines: An Economic Review”, Canadian Competition Law Review 26:1, pp. 59-77. 

Noel, Michael D. (2012). “Edgeworth Price Cycles and Intertemporal Price Discrimination”, Energy Economics, 34(4), pp.942-954. 

Noel, Michael D. and Normann, Parker. (2012). “Market Definition Does Not Yield Evidence of Class-Wide Impact”, The Antitrust Practitioner, Vol. 9, June 2012, pp. 14-18. 

Noel, Michael D. (2012). “Blowing Up the Rockets and Feathers Conspiracy”, Law360 (Competition Law and Energy Law), online, January 19, 2012. 

Lewis, Matthew S. and Noel, Michael D. (2011). “The Speed of Gasoline Price Response in Markets with and without Edgeworth Cycles”, Review of Economics and Statistics, 93(2), pp. 672-682. 

Noel, Michael D. (2009). “Do Gasoline Prices Respond Asymmetrically to Cost Shocks? The Effect of Edgeworth, Cycles”, RAND Journal of Economics, 40:3, pp. 582-595. 

Noel, Michael D. (2007). “Edgeworth Prices Cycles: Evidence from the Toronto Retail Gasoline Market”, Journal of Industrial Economics, 55:1, pp. 69-92. 

Noel, Michael D. (2007). “Edgeworth Price Cycles, Cost-based Pricing, and Sticky Pricing in Retail Gasoline Markets”, Review of Economics and Statistics, 89:2, pp. 324-334.  

Department of Economics