Texas Tech University

Clothing and Textile Objects related to Food

Food is a subject that crosses all areas of human endeavors.  It is represented in art objects, decorative arts objects, clothing and textiles.  To support the Texas Tech University Humanities Department's look at the subject of Food the Museum has mounted an exhibit of object related to the subject.

Following are images of the clothing and textiles objects in the exhibit.

Towels made from feed sacks embroidered with bunnies and a seed packet.

White cotton from feed and flour sacks were often embroidered to be used as towels.  Here are examples of three made by Minnie Irene Souder Jeans (Mrs. Luther Theodore) of Diamond, MO.  Gift of Dr. Robert Bradley.  Below is a feed sack swatch printed with images of grapes, berries and apples.  Partial Gift of Pat L. Nickols and funds from The Quilter's Guild of Dallas, South Plains Quilter's Guild and Individuals.

Coffee Cover

The exhibit includes the grape shaped hot pad used by Nellie Lamb of Lubbock.  Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arch Lamb.  Also shown is a coffee pot cover embroidered by Minnie Irene Souder Jeans (Mrs. Luther Theodore) of Diamond, MO. Gift of Dr. Robert Bradley

Mixer

The celery bag was one of several cotton feed sack bags that were embroidered with the name of foods and used to store foods.   Gift of Catherine Watts.  In the back is a mixer cover embroidered by Minnie Irene Souder Jeans (Mrs. Luther Theodore) of Diamond, MO.  Gift of Dr. Robert Bradley.

Toaster

Embroidered feed sack bags for parsley and radishes.  Gift of Catherine Watts.  In the back is an toaster cover embroidered by Minnie Irene Souder Jeans (Mrs. Luther Theodore) of Diamond, MO.  Gift of Dr. Robert Bradley.

Breadcover

Embroidered covers for tea service for bread and cake.  Gift of Mabel Erwin.

sack

After 1937 feed sacks were printed with colorful prints.  In the exhibit are those that are printed with strawberries, cherries, food serving utensils, vegetables and fruits.  Partial Gift of Pat L. Nickols and funds from The Quilter's Guild of Dallas, South Plains Quilter's Guild and Individuals.

towels

In the mid 20th century there was a fad of using towels marked for specific days of the week. The towels often were decorated with images of the chores that were for that specific day. The sets sometimes had different chores for different days, but Sunday was always for worship, Monday for laundry, Tuesday for Ironing and Wednesday for mending and sewing. In this set Thursday was for grocery shopping and Saturday for baking. Embroidered by Minnie Irene Souder Jeans (Mrs. Luther Theodore) of Diamond, MO. Gift of Dr. Robert Bradley.  The towel to the right is made from a feed sack and embroiderd with coffee pot and cup and embellished at the bottom with hand made lace. Partial Gift of Pat L. Nickols and funds from The Quilter's Guild of Dallas, South Plains Quilter's Guild and Individuals.

garments

These three garments relate to food.  On the left is a 1920s ecru chantilly lace dress over a lime green petticoat embellished in the skirt with representations of grape clussters.  Gift of Anne Snyder.  In the middle the typical 1940s day dress is protected with an apron made of printed cotton feed sacks. Partial Gift of Pat L. Nickols and funds from The Quilter's Guild of Dallas, South Plains Quilter's Guild and Individuals.  On the right is a 1930s dress made of linen with painted decoration of vegetables down the center front.  Gift of Willa Vaughn Tinsley.

vegetable

1930s Linen dress with painted images of vegetables.  Gift of Willa Vaughn Tinsley.