Texas Tech University

Global Readiness Through Language and Culture

Project Objectives | Programming: Fall 2019-Spring 2020 | Contributors

Project Director: Alec Cattell

Co-Directors: Erin Collopy, Charles Grair, Raychel Vasseur

Project Contributors in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures:

Rula Al-Hmoud ARAB 1501: Beginning Course in Arabic I
ARAB 2302: Second Course in Arabic II
ARAB 3305: Introduction to Arab Muslim Civilization
Caroline Bishop CLAS 3340: Gender & Sexuality in the Classical World
Kate Brooke SPAN 1310: Survival Spanish Language & Cultures
Alec Cattell GERM 2302: A Second Course in German II
Erin Collopy RUSN 1501 & 1502: A Beginning Course in Russian I and II
RUSN 2302: A Second Course in Russian II
SLAV 2301: The Vampire in East European and Western Culture
Irina Drigalenko RUSN 2302: A Second Course in Russian II
Carole Edwards FREN 4322: French civilization: the Gourmet culture of France
FREN 4305: Cultures of the Francophone World
Maya Edwards SPAN 2390: Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking World: A Study of Culture Through the Lens of Social Justice
Idoia Elola SPAN 4307: Writing Literacies in Context
SPAN 1607: Intensive Spanish, First Year
SPAN 2607: Intensive Spanish, Second Year
Charles Grair CMLL 2305: Introduction to Languages and Cultures
GERM 2313: Northern Myths and Legends
Belinda Kleinhans GERM 4303: German Classics
Susan Larson SPAN 3306: Introduction to Hispanic Life and Culture: Cities in the Hispanic World
SPAN 3390: Hispanic Culture and Civilization: Hispanic Cities
Rossy Lima SPAN 4309: Literary translation
Anita McChesney GERM 2302: A Second Course in German II
Linley Melhem CMLL 2307: Developing Cultural Intelligence in a Global Society
Kristen Michelson FREN 2302: A Second Course in French
Alicia Miklos SPAN 2300: Social Change in the Hispanic World Through Cultural Expressions
SPAN 4309: Spanish Language Special Topics: Hispanic Media Studies
Kimi Nakatsukasa JAPN 2301: Second Course in Japanese I
JAPN 2302: Second Course in Japanese II
Anthony Qualin RUSN 3305: Topics in Advanced Russian
Marlen Selker GERM 2301: A Second Course in German II
Raychel Vasseur SPAN 2301 & 2302: A Second Course in Spanish I and II
Yanlin Wang CHIN1501 & 1502: A Beginning Course in Chinese I and II
CHIN 2301 & 2302: A Second Course in Chinese I and II
CHIN 3305: Advanced Chinese-Cinema and Chinese Language
Lucas Wood FREN 3303. French Conversation: Cultural Objects and French Society
FREN 4303. Dialogues in French Culture: Political Stages of French Theater
Jorge Zamora SPAN 4308: Business Spanish
SPAN 4309: Medical Spanish
SPAN 4309: Translation and Interpretation

Project Objectives

Funded by the Texas Tech Center for Global Communication, the Global Readiness Through Language and Culture (GRLC) project aims to prepare undergraduate students to identify global issues that connect to their area of study, conduct research on those issues, and demonstrate competencies to address them. By developing co-curricular programming to enhance student learning, the GRLC project will showcase the competencies students develop via the study of languages and cultures as not only highly transferable, but also crucial for navigating global challenges related to population, resources, technology, information, economics, conflict, and governance. Over twenty faculty members in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures (CMLL) will implement this project from Fall 2019 through Spring 2021, engaging more than 3,500 undergraduate students. By integrating targeted assignments, a lecture series, and an ePortfolio to track student achievements, participating faculty will help students develop linguistic, cultural, cross-cultural, and professional competencies. Students in participating courses will 1) create a Global Readiness ePortfolio on Blackboard and upload at least one research artifact; 2) attend one lecture about careers related to global challenge themes (or conduct an informational interview); and 3) present their work to a broader audience. Lower-level students' projects will be archived on the CMLL webpage, and upper-level students will present their work at either the departmental poster presentation (for Fall courses) or at the TTU Undergraduate Research Conference (for Spring courses). Every student's project will address a global challenges theme from the perspective of the language(s) and culture(s) taught and demonstrate competence in one of three areas: Interpersonal Communication (the ability to interact and negotiate meaning in spoken, signed, or written conversations to share information, reactions, feelings, and opinions); Interpretive Communication (the ability to understand, interpret, and analyze what is heard, read, or viewed); or Presentational Communication (the ability to present information and ideas to explain, persuade, and narrate to various audiences using appropriate media). Participating faculty will use the TTU QEP Global Communication Rubric to assess students' achievements as demonstrated by the projects they upload to their ePortfolios.

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Programming: Fall 2019 - Spring 2020

Fall 2019

August 21st, 2019:
Project Overview and ePortfolio Training for GRLC Faculty
3:00-4:00 pm, Room 105

October 1st, 2019:
Global Challenges and Careers Lecture #1: Careers in Interpretation and Translation*
Panelists: Jaime Fatás Cabeza, Winnie Yung-Chung Heh, Audrey Sendejo
4:00-5:30 pm, SUB Allen Theatre

October 16th, 2019:
Interactive Presentation for CMLL Faculty: "Multiliteracies: Linking Theory, Practice, and Purpose"
Presenter: Kristen Michelson
4:00-5:00 pm, Qualia Room

November 6th, 2019:
Global Challenges and Careers Lecture #2: Careers in the Private Sector*
Speaker: Laura Schuster
4:00-5:30 pm, SUB Allen Theatre

November 2019:
Students complete work on their final projects to be showcased in the digital archive (lower levels) or posters to present at the Poster Exhibition (upper levels). Send all files to be printed as posters to alec.cattell@ttu.edu by Nov. 27th. All participating students will fill out a digital submissions form to allow CMLL to showcase their work online. Deliver forms to Alec Cattell by the last day of classes.

December 3rd and 4th, 2019:
Poster Exhibition of Student Work (upper levels), 9:00-5:00 pm, CMLL main lobby

December 11th-13th, 2019:
IDI Training, LL&RC

December 14th-23rd, 2019:
Assessment data reporting for participating courses in Fall 2019, including ARAB 1501 and 3305; CHIN 1501 and 2301; CMLL 2305 and 2307; FREN 2302 and 3303; GERM 2302, 2313, and 4303; JAPN 2301 and 2302; RUSN 1501, 1502, and 3305; SLAV 2302; and SPAN 1310, 1607, 2300, 2301, 2302, and 2390.


  • Use the provided excel template; simply insert assessment data from your course and email it to alec.cattell@ttu.edu
  • Share students' projects in digital form with james.lemon@ttu.edu using a OneDrive link or save to a USB and deliver them in person.

Spring 2020

January 13th, 2020:
Project Progress Report and ePortfolio Training for GRLC Faculty
3:00-4:00 pm, Room 105

January 24th, 2020:
Abstract submission closes at 11:59 pm for the TTU Undergraduate Research Conference (important for students in upper-level GRLC courses).

February 4th, 2020:
Global Challenges and Careers Lecture #3: Careers in Language Education*
Panelists: Alicia Ball, Jeremy Hogan, Omar Palafox, Emily Van Don
4:00-5:30 pm, SUB Allen Theatre

February 20th, 2020:
Multiliteracies Presentation for CMLL Faculty (Kristen Michelson, 4:00-5:00 pm, Qualia Room)

March 4th, 2020:
Global Challenges and Careers Lecture #4: Telling Your Story, Building Your Career*
Speaker: Christine Kampen-Robinson
4:00-5:30 pm, SUB Allen Theatre

March 7th, 2020: Registration closes at 11:59 pm for the TTU Undergraduate Research Conference

March 2020
Students complete work on their final projects to be showcased in the digital archive (lower levels) or posters to present at the Research Conference (upper levels). Send all files to be printed as posters to alec.cattell@ttu.edu by March 25th. All participating students will fill out a digital submissions form to allow CMLL to showcase their work online. Deliver forms to Alec Cattell by the last day of classes.

March 30th-31st, 2020:
Undergraduate Research Conference (upper-level students)

May 13th-22nd: 2020
Assessment data reporting for participating courses in Spring 2020, including: ARAB 2302; CHIN 1502 and 2302; CLAS 3340; FREN 2302 and 4322; GERM 2301, 2302, and 2313; JAPN 2301 and 2302; SPAN 1310, 2607, 2301, 2302, 3306, 4307, and 4309; RUSN 1501, 1502, and 2302; and SLAV 2301.

  • Use the provided excel template; simply insert assessment data from your course and email it to alec.cattell@ttu.edu
  • Share students' projects in digital form with james.lemon@ttu.edu using a OneDrive link or save to a USB and deliver them in person.

* Attendance at one Careers Lecture per semester is mandatory for students in GRLC courses. If a student fails to attend one of the two lectures offered each semester, they may complete the following make-up assignment: Conduct an informational interview or study written sources and write a brief report on how a career that requires skills gained via the study of languages and cultures addresses global challenges such as population, resources, technology, information, economics, conflict, or governance.

Contributors

Rula Al-Hmoud

ARAB 1501: Beginning Course in Arabic I (Fall 2019). In this introductory course, students learn the basic building blocks of the Modern Standard Arabic language. Students will use Google Maps to develop their oral and written proficiency and develop competence in using technology to communicate about populations and cultures.

ARAB 2302: Second Course in Arabic II (Spring 2020) In this intermediate course, students continue to develop their listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic. Students will use Google Maps to deepen their understanding of how technology can be used to generate new knowledge about global populations and cultures.

ARAB 3305: Introduction to Arab Muslim Civilization. Students who study abroad will also participate in a reflection on cultural aspects they discovered during study abroad and describe their experiences in Arabic. They will also reflect on their development of language skills during their stay and on the role of technologies such as Google Maps in facilitating language acquisition.

Caroline Bishop

CLAS 3340: Gender & Sexuality in the Classical World (Spring 2020). In this upper-level classics course, students read the works of women authors, who were a marginalized class in both Greece and Rome, and learn how ancient discourses on gender and sexuality inform present day issues. For their final project, students use close reading and research on an ancient woman-authored text to produce a piece of creative writing that addresses a modern concern in the style of that author. These pieces of creative writing will be published as poster projects and in a digital archive. By tackling modern issues from the perspective of a marginalized other from the ancient world, these final projects will demonstrate the continuity between cultural practices then and now. Each project will touch on one of the global challenge areas.

Kate Brooke

SPAN 1310: Survival Spanish Language & Cultures (1 section Fall 2019 and 1 section Spring 2020). In this lower-level language course students study situation-based Spanish and the culture of the Hispanic world to prepare them to study abroad. As a final project students will work in groups to create a video in which they compare the way an event or tradition is celebrated in the United States' culture with the way the event or tradition is celebrated in a Spanish-speaking country's culture. The group will examine the underlying values that inform the event or tradition and its celebration in each culture, making connections to relevant global challenge themes.

Alec Cattell

GERM 2302: A Second Course in German II (1 or sections every semester). In these lower-level language courses conducted in German, students will create a narrated PowerPoint presentation in which they reflect on cultural differences they would experience while living in a German-speaking country. They will also complete a writing assignment in which they describe and interpret intercultural encounters and conflicts portrayed in a contemporary German film. Both assignments will address global challenge topics and will be added to the students' ePortfolios and the digital archive.

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Erin Collopy

RUSN 1501 & 1502: Beginning Russian I and II (240 students through Fall 2019-Spring 2021). Students will read articles in English about global challenge themes in Russian-speaking countries. Students will create a PowerPoint presentation on one of the global challenge themes, showing how the peoples of Russian-speaking countries contend with the challenge.

SLAV 2301: The Vampire in East European and Western Culture (Fall 2019-Spring 2021, 100 students per semester). This course fulfills the Language, Philosophy and Culture and the Multicultural requirement. Students will select a pre-approved non-US vampire film or literary work and develop a PowerPoint analyzing the work, focussing on the anxieties of that culture as portrayed through the vampire. Students will be asked to consider how literature and film can reflect and interrogate global challenges and how the issues that individual cultures face can be both culturally specific and global.

Irina Drigalenko

RUSN 2302: A Second Course in Russian II (two sections in Spring 2020). In these lower-level language courses conducted in Russian, students will identify, disseminate, and interpret areas of strength and concern regarding social issues in Russia through authentic materials, contemporary Russian films, and social media interaction with students who live and study in Russia. Students will complete a writing assignment based on their research to interpret the issue. They will create a narrated PowerPoint presentation in which they reflect on cultural differences they would experience while living in Russia or in a Russian-speaking community. Both assignments will be added to the students' ePortfolios and the digital archive.

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Carole Edwards

FREN 4322: French civilization: the Gourmet culture of France (Spring 2020). This course presents a survey of French civilization from the Middle Ages to the present, dealing with literature, art, music, philosophy, science, and history. Students will learn the cultural significance of food in France and Francophone countries by examining regional specialties, etiquette, culinary techniques, and food in various contexts. Students will make a video in which they will describe the making of a recipe (of a French or Francophone dish). They will present their recipes in detail, using French measurements, explaining the regional and historical importance of the dish, and addressing larger global issues of resources and economics. Each video will contain a minimum of three stages. Finally, students will self-assess their own work and explain the difficulties they encountered if any before offering a final tasting (dégustation).

FREN 4305: Cultures of the Francophone World (Fall 2020). This course presents a survey of French-speaking cultures of the world, including history, arts, customs and daily life. This course looks at the cultures of Francophonie, the diverse French-speaking cultures located outside of France. In this course, students will complete a research project that compares and contrasts the cultures of each of the French-speaking regions and countries examined in the course with each other and with the cultures of France and their own countries. They will each create a PowerPoint presentation on an aspect of Francophone daily life, customs and tradition in a given place. The topics will include the global challenge issues of population, resources, technology, information, economics, conflict and governance.

Maya Edwards

SPAN 2390: Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking World: A Study of Culture Through the Lens of Social Justice. This course, taught in English with no prerequisite, is also an elective for the interdisciplinary Minor in the Literature of Social Justice and the Environment (LSJE). Designed as an introduction to Spanish speaking cultures (in Latin America, the U.S., Spain) through a lens of social justice, this course is intended to bring awareness to a wide range of themes that impact global and local communities. Topics include issues of human rights, power, access, stigmatization, border identities, migrations, ideologies, and protest. Students will complete a Story Map, in which they will discuss an aspect of a current issue as it relates to both global and local Spanish speaking communities and social justice. The digital nature of these projects allows students to find language resources and a platform with which to discuss socially and culturally relevant issues of personal, local, and international concern.

Idoia Elola

SPAN 4307: Writing Literacies in Context (Spring 2020). This
course entails the development of writing literacies in context, which offers students an opportunity to improve the writing, but more importantly the communicative skills they need in their future careers in the 21st
century. Students will use these communication skills to give voice to the use of the Spanish and English languages at the regional and global level. The linguistic and cultural project in this course aims at developing tools to enhance students' critical awareness toward the value of these languages and the communities that use them. Students will operationalize the concept of linguistic landscapes as a pedagogical tool for exploring the theme using story maps which then can be publicly presented.

SPAN 1607: Intensive Spanish, First Year and SPAN 2607: Intensive Spanish, Second Year (Spring 2020). These two language courses that take place in the study abroad context of Seville, Spain, allow for a deeper understanding of linguistic use and study abroad experience by Incorporating a linguistic/cultural project (being able to compare many aspects of the student's experience in
the study abroad and the at-home contexts). The linguistic/culture project (photographic investigations, interviews with the communities that inhabit Seville, and the students' critical analyses of their data and personal experience) allows for a linguistic project that illustrates the bilingual and translingual phenomena that is occurring in contexts where languages come into contact with each other (either sporadically and arbitrarily like the languages of tourism or permanently like that of immigrants or bilingual
societies). The results of this project are presented to the TTU student and faculty body in Seville in a formal presentation (mainly in a PowerPoint format).

Charles Grair

CMLL 2305: Introduction to Languages and Cultures (Fall 2019 and Fall 2020, 70-105 students per semester). The course fulfills the language, philosophy, and culture core requirement. Students in this course will pursue research projects on the effects of globalization on indigenous language communities around the globe and in the US. Students will be asked to consider how these small populations deal with global challenge topics while attempting to maintain their minority language and culture. Students will workshop their projects during class time, but submit individual research projects in the form of essays or PowerPoint presentations.

GERM 2313: Northern Myths and Legends (Fall and Spring Semesters, 2019-2021, 60-105 students per semester). The course fulfills the language, philosophy, and culture core requirement. Students in this course will pursue research projects on the themes of conflict and colonization as depicted in these works of legend and history. Specifically, they will address the question of how these cultures depicted the issues of the global challenge areas in the past (especially population, resources, technology, conflict, and governance), and how the conceptual models from that time continue to influence our thinking today. Students will workshop their projects during class time, but submit individual research projects in the form of essays or PowerPoint presentations.

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Belinda Kleinhans

GERM 4303: German Classics (Fall 2019). This upper-level course familiarizes students with German-language texts that are part of the canon of German literature and thus still read in Germany today, and that are often adapted as films, theatre plays, graphic novels, musicals, children's books, etc. The course will also examine variations of these texts and discuss their transformation across time and space through adaptation theory. Students will identify one major German text as the basis of their project and then either create their own literary adaptation (reflecting on culture-specific and/or time-specific vs. universal ideas expressed in the original and the adaptation), or present an analysis of an adaptation from another time period in Germany, or from another culture. In both cases, students will address the relevance of national identity-forming texts in their original country and abroad, and analyze which ideas can be universally kept, which ideas need to be dropped, and which ideas have to be transformed in order to be applicable to a new context. This will help students develop important transcultural skills that can be applied to understanding the global challenge area of populations and conflicts on a deeper level.

Susan Larson

SPAN 3306: Introduction to Hispanic Life and Culture: Cities in the Hispanic World (Spring 2020). Students will write a reflective but theoretically-informed essay on an experience that they have had speaking Spanish in Lubbock, Texas. These essays will be accompanied by at least one photograph and made into geolocalization points on a digital map of Lubbock and the surrounding area. Taken together this interactive map will create a collective cartography of local Spanish-speaking experience, addressing the global challenge theme of population.

SPAN 3390: Hispanic Culture and Civilization: Hispanic Cities (Fall 2020, 100 students). This course is conducted in English and satisfies the TTU Multicultural requirement. It draws students from many different majors all around campus. In this course, students will write a reflective but theoretically-informed essay comparing Latino Lubbock to the other Latino or Hispanic Cities studied during the first 12 weeks of the semester. They will include at least one photograph and be made into geolocalization points on a digital map of Lubbock and the surrounding area. Taken together this interactive map will create an opportunity to consider how Lubbock's urban experience is similar to and/or different from the urbanization processes of other parts of the Spanish-Speaking world, addressing the global challenge theme of population.

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Rossy Lima

SPAN 4309: Literary translation (Fall 2019-Spring 2020). In this upper-level translation class where students will learn different techniques used to translate literary texts such as short stories, poetry, comic books, and personal essays. This class has a Service Learning component in which the students will collect personal narratives from Spanish native speakers in an adult care facility, transcribe and translate their narratives as part of the class project, as well as work on the translation of letters from the Lubbock ISD schools to the parents. These activities tie course learning outcomes to the needs of local populations.

Anita McChesney

GERM 2302: A Second Course in German II (1 section in Fall 2019 and 2 sections in Spring 2020). In these lower-level language courses conducted in German, students will create a narrated PowerPoint presentation in which they reflect on cultural differences they would experience while living in a German-speaking country. They will also complete a writing assignment in which they describe and interpret intercultural encounters and conflicts portrayed in a contemporary German film. Both assignments will address global challenge topics and be added to the students' ePortfolios and the digital archive.

Linley Melhem

CMLL 2307: Developing Cultural Intelligence in a Global Society (Fall 2019). In this lower-level course, students will learn about and practice the skills of cultural intelligence by participating in cross-cultural conversation groups between U.S. American and international students. Students will complete biweekly written reflections on their experiences in the groups. Students will choose one reflection assignment for the ePortfolio and the digital archive that addresses a global challenge topic. At the end of the course, students will also create a narrated presentation in which they synthesize the course content with their first-hand experiences in the conversation groups. Both the personal reflection and presentation assignments will be added to the students' ePortfolios and the digital archive.

Kristen Michelson

FREN 2302: A Second Course in French (taught every semester). The project in FREN 2302 will center around the focal themes of resources and information, through texts on the topic of climate change. Students will be guided in analysis of multimodal posters created by activists, then in the interpretation of newspaper articles about youth climate activists around the world, and of graphs related to climate change impacts. Students will dialogue about possible meanings in activist posters, about how and why certain posters work, about perspectives and ideologies in news articles, and about the impacts of climate change on populations in different parts of the Francophone world. Textual interpretation and dialogues will be supported through a tool called hypothes.is, which allows users to dialogue virtually while annotating web pages collaboratively. Finally, students will produce multimodal posters, either in the form of activist posters (about the dangers of climate change, about actions that individuals can take, or expressing a counter position to the act of protesting for this cause). They will also create a multimodal informational poster about how climate issues impact different populations within the Francophone world.

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Alicia Miklos

SPAN 2300: Social Change in the Hispanic World Through Cultural Expressions (Fall 2019, 100 students). This upper-level course is conducted in English and satisfies the TTU Multicultural requirement and the Language and Philosophy Core Requirements. The course will appeal to students across different majors and colleges. In this course, students will complete an analytical final paper, in which they examine an artistic work, a piece of literature, or a media product such as a film or telenovela. Students will discuss how cultural products in the Hispanic world use narrative and visual strategies to enter into debates about the global challenge areas dealing with modernization, militarization and revolution, imperialism, and/or gender relations.

SPAN 4309: Spanish Language Special Topics: Hispanic Media Studies (Spring 2020). This upper-level course is conducted in Spanish and counts toward the Spanish major and minor. Due to the focus on media, students will complete a final digital media project in the form of a podcast, digital story, story map, or blog, in which they discuss a current issue in the field within Latin America. Possible topics include the global challenge areas of technology, information, conflict, and governance, and may address censorship and freedom of the press, investigative journalism, media formations and conglomerates, or popular culture via radio, television, or film. Students will place these final digital media projects in an online portfolio.

Kimi Nakatsukasa

JAPN 2301 and 2302: Second Course in Japanese I and II (Sections? Semesters?). These intermediate courses are conducted in Japanese with about 25 students in each section. Students will complete a final digital media project in the form of a YouTube video. Using digital media, they will collect information on topics related to Japanese pop culture (e.g., literature,
online game, food, film, music, etc.) and present why these cultural artifacts motivate them to study Japanese. These projects will make connections between the study of Japanese language and culture and the global challenge themes of information and technology.

Anthony Qualin

Russian 3305: Topics in Advanced Russian (Fall 2019). In this course, the students will complete a reading assignment involving an authentic Russian text that deals with global challenge issues on such topics as conflict resolution, human rights, citizen diplomacy, and environmental conservation. The students will prepare written and oral presentations on their chosen topics. The presentations will be added to their digital portfolios.

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Marlene Selker

GERM 2301: A Second Course in German II (Spring and Fall 2020). Students will do research on the global challenge topics of resources and technology, addressing the topic of sustainability in German culture. The mode of presentation will be a poster with captions or other visual documentation (3D art, video) and the recording of their presentations. The presentations will be added to their digital portfolios.

Raychel Vasseur - Language Program Coordinator

SPAN 2301 & 2302: A Second Year Course in Spanish (1,100 students between Fall 2019-Spring 2020): In these lower-level Spanish classes, students will produce analytical and creative projects for inclusion in the ePortfolio and digital archive. The goal of these projects is for students to discuss and reflect on the Spanish language and the presence of Hispanics in the U.S. Students will address global challenge topics of population, economics and information, and they will work with a variety of sources (newspaper articles, videos, radio reports) to provide them information to reflect on and discuss as a group throughout the semester. Finally, students will either create a cultural artifact (e.g., a video, song, comic, play, interview, poem, etc.) or write an academic paper to explain and reflect on the Spanish language in the US from different perspectives.

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Yanlin Wang

CHIN 1501 & 1502: A Beginning Course in Chinese (fall semester) & 2 (spring semester).
CHIN 2301 & 2302: A Second Course in Chinese 1 (fall semester) & 2 (spring semester).
In these lower-level Chinese language courses, students will work as teams to conduct studies regarding global challenge issues in current Chinese society, such as population, information, economics, and governance. The topics will cover, but are not limited to, Chinese higher education, Chinese new policy "The Belt and The Road", Donald Trump and China, "Double Eleven" Chinese Black Friday, Relationship between China and US. Students will collect, integrate, and analyze data and articles, consider different points of view and work effectively with others to support a shared purpose, and develop their creative thinking skills and interpersonal communicative skills. Students will make an oral presentation of their research in the classroom in both Chinese and English (varying according to language proficiency) guided by detailed instructions, and a digital written version of their presentation will be added to their digital portfolios. Oral presentation will be followed by a group discussion and a peer-review.

CHIN 3305: Advanced Chinese - Cinema and Chinese Language (Spring, 2021). In this upper-level Chinese language course, students will interview Chinese native speakers to deeply discuss various topics regarding global challenge areas, such as the Chinese economy, family relationships, and Chinese foreign policy, etc. Students will watch movies to identify interview questions, collect and analyze data and read articles to deepen their understanding on the topics, and conduct the interview in both Chinese and English. The project will help students to distinguish the differences between China and US, to develop their oral communicative skills, and to enhance their ability to collect and synthesize different sources of information. Students will video-record their interview and then make an oral presentation in both Chinese and English in the classroom followed by a group discussion and a peer reviewing. Students' interview and oral presentation will be graded. The interview video will be added to the digital archive.

Lucas Wood

FREN 3303. French Conversation: Cultural Objects and French Society (Fall 2019). This conversation course aims to increase students' linguistic and cultural fluency in French by engaging them in active discussion and debate around a wide range of social, cultural, and political topics dealing with global challenge areas. Every student will participate in one of three formal debates on issues that respectively call into question French and American ideas about the nature of art, the ethics of advertising, and the politics of state bans on religious dress in public settings. Each debater will both deliver a prepared statement and respond impromptu to the arguments raised by the opposition. The debates will be filmed and added to the students' ePortfolios and to the digital archive.

FREN 4303. Dialogues in French Culture: Political Stages of French Theater (Fall 2020). This upper-level course, conducted in French and aimed at French majors and minors, asks students to consider the place of politics in the French dramatic tradition and the role of theater in political life, thus addressing the global challenge areas of information, conflict, and governance. Each student will complete a pastiche project based on one course text, consisting of a literary pastiche—a single scene written by the student for possible insertion into the chosen play, imitating the style and thematic or ideological content of the chosen work of political theater—and critical self-commentary explaining what aspects of the model text are imitated in the pastiche and how it displays the results of a thoughtful analysis of the original play's dramatic style and political concerns. These assignments will be added to the students' ePortfolios and to the digital archive.

Jorge Zamora

SPAN 4308: Business Spanish (2 sections Fall 2019). Business Spanish is a task-based course which entails business document interpretation and translation from English to Spanish and from Spanish to English. It requires prompt and diligent preparation of documents and a moderate amount of reading and research primarily in Spanish. The course includes guest speakers, and participation in cultural activities involving visits to locations outside of the classroom and in some cases, off campus. Students will pursue individual and detailed research on business practices in a Spanish-speaking country and prepare a report on a specific business, comparing it to practices in the US. This project will address the global challenge areas of resources, technology, and economics.

SPAN 4309: Medical Spanish (Fall 2019). This course is designed to enhance oral and written competence of Spanish in the area of Healthcare. Course material includes vocabulary, terminology and phraseology related to the area of Healthcare, including, but not limited to the following: Basic Emergency situations; Anatomy and Physiology; Lab Procedures; Diseases; Administrative Healthcare situations. Students will pursue individual research on the healthcare treatment of Hispanic populations and prepare a report or PowerPoint presentation on the challenges of dealing with minority-language populations in a global context. This project will address the global challenge areas of population, technology, and information.

SPAN 4309: Translation and Interpretation (Spring 2020). Translation and Interpretation is a task-based course which entails a substantial amount of translation and interpretation of texts, audios and videos from English to Spanish and from Spanish to English. Source texts include authentic material from business, politics, law, medicine, literature and film. The course may include guest speakers, and participation in some cultural activities involving visits to locations outside of the classroom and in some cases, off campus. Students will choose a body of texts from a specific foreign source, and prepare an analysis of the linguistic, cultural, and transcultural knowledge necessary to translate the material appropriately for an American, English-speaking audience. This project will address the global challenge areas of technology, information, economics, and/or governance.

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James Lemon

From May-August 2020 and May-August 2021, Mr. Lemon will create a digital archive of student work produced during each academic year on the website of the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures. The archive can also be linked to the website of the Center for Global Communication. Upon receiving students' digital submissions forms and project files (which will be compiled throughout the academic year by a graduate student), Mr. Lemon will use the summer months to create a webpage that lists student projects according to the global challenge themes they address (a total of 7 categories), with subsections organizing the projects by language and level. The list of projects will include links to PDF and image files as well as links to CMLL's YouTube channel, where student projects in video format will be uploaded. This approach to archiving will ensure that students' projects are digitally showcased in a timely manner and are easily accessible to a broad audience. A copy of all files will be stored on a local server for future curation.

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