Texas Tech University

Human Development and Family Sciences

 
 
Research in Early Developmental Studies (RED) Lab Texas TechResearch in Early Developmental Studies (RED) Lab Texas TechResearch in Early Developmental Studies (RED) Lab Texas TechResearch in Early Developmental Studies (RED) Lab Texas Tech

Research in Early Developmental Studies (RED) Lab

Welcome to the RED Lab!

The RED Lab is dedicated to studying early developmental trajectories of typically developing children, as well as children at risk for developmental delays and autism spectrum disorders. The RED Lab incorporates collaborations in the fields of developmental science, neuroscience, and computer science. Specifically, the RED Lab examines the impact of early developmental hazards—such as poverty, toxic stress and health disparities—on developmental outcomes and family wellbeing. By examining the environments surrounding children and critically analyzing bidirectional risk factors, steps can be made toward defining trajectories and implementing early interventions. Our lab aims to assess early risk factors and implement evidence-based intervention practices to alleviate adverse outcomes families may face as a result of a child's unique developmental patterns and environmental stressors. Current research studies include the following content areas: parent and peer-mediated early interventions, eye-tracking and robotics to understand visual, social and joint attention skills, early parent engagement and dyadic synchrony, G x E interactions and effects on early brain development, and the impact of post traumatic growth for children exposed to trauma. In addition to data collection in the lab, we also use several secondary data sets to examine longitudinal trajectories and mediators and moderators that impact developmental pathways.

Research in Early Developmental Studies (RED) Lab Texas Tech


Contact

Jessica Blume, M.S., CCC-SLP
RED Lab Manager
Email: Jessica.Blume@ttu.edu
Phone:(806)834-8995



As stated by the Greek philosopher Plutarch, "The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled." Our laboratory research efforts aim to stoke developmental fires — not put them out.

-Dr. Ann Mastergeorge