Texas Tech University

AI Teaching Resources

This resource page is evolving quickly with new resources and information, and we hope that you will check back often. If you would like to talk about teaching with artifical intelligence and your concerns or ideas, please feel free to contact Suzanne Tapp or Alec Cattell, or any member of the TLPDC team at 806-742-0133.

AI at Texas Tech


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Syllabus Statements

The AI Resources and Guidelines Committee has provided three recommendations for syllabus statements regarding artificial intelligence. Review all required and recommended statements.

Sample Assignments

“Beefing up” An Assignment: How to Use AI to Enhance an Existing Assignment by Belinda Kleinhans, Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures

Group Curated Generative AI Prompts & Results Portfolio with Individual Reflection Component by Lisa Phillips, Technical Communication & Rhetoric

What can I do to maintain academic integrity in large courses? by Sarai Brinker, School of Music

Career Goals Example Assignment from Tommy Brecheisen, Journalism & Creative Media Industries

Frequently Asked Questions

What can I do if I suspect academic misconduct with AI?

Many faculty are alarmed at potential violations of Academic Misconduct related to AI and feel concerned about what the future may hold as AI becomes more capable of mimicking human voice and decisions. What Steps Do I Take if I Suspect Academic Misconduct with AI?

What is TTU's policy on AI detectors?

The AI Guidelines and Resources Committee suggests extreme caution when considering AI detection tools. The bottom line is that no conclusive proof can be provided by an AI detection tool at this time. Given the easy access students have to generative AI tools, we find ourselves at a crossroads in education. Why TTU Recommends Caution with AI Detectors

How do I talk to my students about AI?

Communicate with students about AI in the syllabus, in class during the first week of the semester, and again each time a task is assigned to remind them of your expectations for how they will use or not use AI in your course. The specific nature of your policy is up to you! As you think about what AI use you will (dis)allow, it can be extremely helpful to begin with the intended learning outcomes of your course and then consider how the use of AI might enhance, limit, or shift these.

Here's a sample policy from a course that includes several smaller writing assignments. These instructions are included in each writing assignment to remind students of the syllabus policy discussed on the first day of class:

As you work on this assignment, you are welcome to use ChatGPT or another AI tool to assist you with brainstorming ideas, creating an outline, and drafting your first version of the text. In line with our course policy, up to 40% of your first draft may be generated by AI, and you must indicate these portions of the text by marking them in red.

During the peer review stage, AI use is prohibited, because it is important for your peers to hear your authentic voice and learn from your perspective: How did what they wrote “land” with you? What questions do you have after reading it? What would you suggest to improve upon the first draft? I have provided a rubric to guide your review, and you will be asked to insert comments into the text you are reviewing.

When it comes to the final draft of your paper, AI use is also prohibited. At this stage, you will have everything you need to produce a polished draft, including feedback from me and two of your peers. This policy supports one of the course's main learning objectives: To foster a community of human learners who support each other in developing critical thinking skills. That is why we agree to use AI in ways that enhance our efficiency without diminishing our ability to think independently and build connections with each other.

What can I do if I suspect academic misconduct with AI?

Many faculty are alarmed at potential violations of Academic Misconduct related to AI and feel concerned about what the future may hold as AI becomes more capable of mimicking human voice and decisions. What Steps Do I Take if I Suspect Academic Misconduct with AI?

What are simple ways to start incorporating AI into my classes?

Idea #1: Have students use AI as a tutoring tool to help them prepare for tests by checking their understanding of course material.

Example: Open AI's ChatGPT-40 is now available for free and offers enhanced capabilities in understanding and discussing images, voice, and text in over 50 languages. Students could use tools like this to practice their speaking and writing skills (in English or in other languages) in real time. AI can provide customized, constructive feedback on aspects such as pronunciation, lexical choice, register, and tone. You might consider asking students to submit a transcript of their AI tutoring session as a formative assessment.

Idea #2: Ask students to evaluate AI-generated content and compare it to human-generated content to boost their AI literacy and critical thinking skills.  

Example: Task students with identifying key ideas and main arguments in an AI-generated text and then ask them to find and cross-reference external source material to engage in lateral reading. Students could work in pairs to create an annotated list of sources that includes their thoughts on the motivation of the authors, the evidence and logic they use to build their argument, any biases they detect, as well as omissions and hallucinations they find in the AI-generated text. 

How can I use AI to streamline teaching tasks? 

Magic School AI offers tools that can speed up the process of designing lesson plans, writing assignment instructions, creating rubrics to evaluate student work, remixing tests, and more. A free version is available.

 

Teaching, Learning, & Professional Development Center

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