Texas Tech University

Texas Tech University School of Veterinary Medicine Course Descriptions

Year 1, Semester 1 Course Descriptions

DVM 5200 Introduction to Domestic Animals/Medical Math/Medical Terminology (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course provides students with an introduction to the major domestic species, the relevant animal industries, and the stakeholders that are served by the profession. It also provides an introduction to medical math and medical terminology. Students are expected to share their knowledge and expertise so that students learn and share the common vocabulary related to animal industries. The role of the profession in animal health and welfare, in supporting animal industries, and in protecting human and environmental health will be explored. Students explore how people associate with animals, the issues that arise from these associations and the roles that veterinarians play in these contexts. Students observe animals as companions, in sport, for food, and in research. Students gain knowledge of commonly used medical terms and their application. Students are introduced to commonly used medical calculations (creating a % solution, calculating a fluid rate, replacing a fluid deficit, calculating drug dosages of commonly used medications, etc.)

DVM 5630 Form and Function Ia (6 credits, 4 hours lecture, 6 hours lab). This team-taught course establishes a solid, integrated foundation in anatomy and physiology. A combination of didactic lectures, laboratory sessions, and small group activities will be utilized to develop a strong understanding of structural and functional concepts and relationships in the major domestic species. Emphasis will be placed on clinical relevance, 3-dimensional and functional relationships, microscopic and gross anatomy, and physiological activity of organs. Key concepts in embryology will be integrated throughout the course. Together with Form and Function Ib, fundamental and comparative anatomical and physiological concepts will be investigated, focusing on the locomotor system, limbs, and thorax, to include nervous, musculoskeletal, respiratory and cardiovascular systems, during the fall. Integration of knowledge with relevant case material or diagnostic techniques will be included.

DVM 5210 Clinical and Professional Skills Ia (2 credits, 1 hour lecture, 7 hours lab1). Through a series of clinically oriented learning experiences students will become competent in individual and herd physical examinations and history taking. In addition, they will gain experience in diagnostic procedures, introductory instrument and suture handling, and develop introductory skill sets in clinical intervention and patient management. Students will be introduced to basic communication and its importance in veterinary medicine, especially in the area of history taking, team building, diversity, financial literacy, and humanistic skills. Students will demonstrate development in communication, leadership, and professional skills related to the profession. Note: This course will include laboratories normally found in other courses such as parasitology diagnostic procedures.

DVM 5240 The Profession and Professionalism (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course introduces students to the concept of a profession, what it means to be a professional, and the career pathways available in veterinary medicine. The principles of professionalism, including relevant jurisprudence, self-regulation, ethics, and life-long learning will be introduced. The principles of clients, stakeholders, and community, and the importance of their relationships, will be discussed. The concepts of the healthy veterinarian and self-management are explored, including professional renewal and self-care, financial management, pursuing and meeting professional goals, focusing on career, and growing and developing in a changing environment.

DVM 5120 Clinical Presentations Ia (1 credit). A problem/clinical presentation-based course where students will develop their problem-solving, diagnostic reasoning, and clinical decision-making skills by exploring a series of clinical presentations. Presentations will cover clinical problems, health protection problems, public health/public practice and research problems, in individuals, groups, and populations of animals. Skills will include problem identification, information gathering and assessment, analytic and non-analytic clinical and diagnostic reasoning skills clinical reasoning, and problem solving. Students are expected to integrate foundational knowledge from biomedical sciences with clinical sciences, population health science, and technical skills to explore and resolve problems. The focus in Clinical Presentations Ia is on the ability to differentiate normal from abnormal and to start learning to integrate this into diagnostic reasoning.

DVM 5160 Introduction to Animal Care (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). Fundamental concepts pertaining to the care and husbandry of the major domestic species will be covered, with an emphasis on practices of particular relevance to the region. Topics covered include routine management practices and fundamentals of managing breeding programs. The emphasis is on standards of practice and routine care, with the expectation that the scientific underpinnings will subsequently be learned in the program.

DVM 5370 Principles of Epidemiology (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Students will be introduced to the basic principles and methods used in veterinary epidemiology. These concepts include types of epidemiologic studies, measures of disease frequency and association, epidemic and infectious disease dynamics, disease causation, and the relationships between population and individual animal medicine, and basic statistical concepts applied to veterinary medicine. The course will provide foundational skills relevant to population health, which includes public health, health management, and clinical medicine.

DVM 5380 Parasitology (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). The students will learn the fundamentals of parasitology in animals of veterinary importance. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding of the epidemiology, host-parasite interaction, and clinical disease of North American parasites, particularly those in Texas and the surrounding regions. Attention will also be given to those that pose a zoonotic, biosafety, or security threat. Students will also learn diagnostic, management, and treatment practices in the different species of parasites and their hosts.

DVM 5190 Inquiry and Investigation (1 hour, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). Students are introduced to the concepts critical to successful biomedical, population health, and clinical research. The course will also address ethical considerations of animal use in research, academia, and industry. Concepts of research design will build on earlier course work. Students will be exposed to concepts of information resource literature searches, systematic reviews, meta-analysis, and evidence-based medicine. The focus is on evaluating and synthesizing literature to achieve a meaningful conclusion relevant to veterinary medicine and the pursuit of new knowledge.

1 Clinical practicum and laboratory courses are assigned credit hours based on learning objectives rather than the standard contact hour requirements for lectures.

Year 1, Semester 2 Course Descriptions

DVM 5731 Form and Function Ib (7 credits, 5 hours lecture, 4-5 hours lab). This course is a continuation of the study of cellular, tissue, and organ morphology and function, and their control and integration in animals from Form and Function Ia. Emphasis will be on the anatomy and physiology of the abdominal and pelvic organs in small and large domestic animals, which are vital to SVM students to matriculate through the veterinary curriculum in preparation to understand the principles of practicing veterinary medicine and entering the medical profession. Anatomical structures of the head and special senses will be studied and cranial nerves will be correlated with systemic anatomy and with other regional anatomy to facilitate understanding of regional diagnostic nerve blocks. Physiologic processes and histologic correlates will accompany and be integrated with anatomy instruction. To encourage student participation in the learning process, active learning techniques will be employed. Emphasis will be placed on upper respiratory tract, digestive and reproductive, and renal systems, as well as areas controlled by cranial nerves. The basic principles that underlie physiological processes will be described, and the anatomical and functional disturbances that present clinically will be highlighted.

DVM 5341 Pathologic Basis of Disease (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course provides an introduction to the general processes underlying disease. Morphologic and functional changes in cells, tissues, and organs as a result of internal and external stimuli are discussed. Students obtain a basic understanding of the development of lesions and the complex relationship between host, pathogen, and environment that leads to dysfunction and disease. The use of pathology as a diagnostic tool and the relationship between pathology and clinical medicine is introduced. Students are introduced to safe, systematic approaches to performing postmortem examinations. Students learn to recognize and describe common gross and microscopic lesions using appropriate medical and specifically pathological terminology. Note: laboratory experience for this subject will be included in the Clinical and Professional Skills Ib course.

DVM 5251 Immunology (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course presents an introduction to veterinary immunology including mechanisms of resistance of infectious diseases and tumors and tissue injury caused by the immune system. Also this course will cover topics on hypersensitivity reactions and autoimmunity, immunization theory and practices, and immunologic methods for diagnosis of disease.

DVM 5121 Clinical Presentations Ib (1 credit, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). A problem/clinical presentation-based course where students will develop their problem-solving, diagnostic reasoning, and clinical decision-making skills by exploring a series of clinical presentations. Presentations will cover clinical problems, health protection problems, public health/public practice and research problems, in individuals, groups, and populations of animals. Skills will include problem identification, information gathering and assessment, analytic and non-analytic clinical and diagnostic reasoning skills clinical reasoning, and problem solving. Students are expected to integrate foundational knowledge from biomedical sciences with clinical sciences, population health science, and technical skills to explore and resolve problems. The focus in Clinical Presentations Ib is on the ability to differentiate normal from abnormal and to start learning to integrate this into diagnostic reasoning.

DVM 5281 Animal Behavior and Welfare (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Fundamental concepts pertaining to the behavior of the major domestic species and relevant wildlife will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on recognition of normal behavior and the effects of disruption of normal behavior on management. The effect of management practices on the welfare and behavior of domestic animals will be examined, as will domestic animal-human-wildlife interactions. Pertinent legislation regarding the welfare of companion and farmed animals will be discussed.

DVM 5211 Clinical and Professional Skills Ib (2 credits, 1 hour lecture, 7 hours lab). Through a series of clinically oriented learning experiences students will become competent in individual and herd physical examinations and history taking. This course builds on skills from Ia, furthering surgical and diagnostic skills. In addition, students will gain experience in diagnostic procedures and develop introductory skill sets in clinical intervention and patient management. Students will build on communications skills and conflict resolution.

DVM 5361 Microbiology (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course provides an overview of the bacterial and fungal classes important in animal health and disease and explore how virulence mechanisms lead to the spectrum of animal bacterial and fungal diseases and zoonotic diseases. The interaction of bacteria and fungi with the animal host, the environment and shared human hosts will be explored. Students will be introduced to diagnostic and management approaches relevant to common bacterial and fungal diseases.

DVM 5271 Virology (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Students will learn the principles of viruses and prions of veterinary medical importance to animal and public health, including molecular, cellular, and organismal effects on the host that lead to diseases. Viral diseases relevant to North America and important foreign animal diseases will be explored. Students will be introduced to diagnostic and management strategies relevant to common viral diseases.

Year 2, Semester 3 Course Descriptions

DVM 6200 Animal Industries (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Animal industries provides students with the opportunity to explore animal industries first-hand to understand the complex business models and personal decisions that drive successful industries. Students are provided the opportunity to observe the normal behavior of animals within the different animal industries, in order to be able to appreciate abnormal behavior or signs that may indicate the presence of disease or reduced animal welfare.

DVM 6320 Clinical Presentations IIa (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). A problem-based course where students will develop their problem-solving, diagnostic reasoning, and clinical decision-making skills by exploring a series of clinical presentations. Presentations will cover clinical problems, health protection problems, public health/public practice and research problems. Skills will include problem identification, information gathering and assessment, clinical reasoning and problem solving. Students are expected to integrate foundational knowledge from biomedical sciences with clinical sciences, population health science and technical skills to explore and resolve problems. The focus in CPII is on problem assessment, diagnostic reasoning skills and establishment of differential diagnoses. This will include developing schemata and differential diagnoses lists, making decisions about using appropriate diagnostic tests, and interpreting and integrating data from those tests, and using foundational knowledge from discipline courses to diagnose common clinical presentations. Students are introduced to clinical decision-making.

DVM 6310 Clinical and Professional Skills IIa (3 credits, 1 hour lecture, 7 hours lab). Building on Clinical & Professional Skills I, students will continue to expand their clinical skills in clinical examination of relevant body systems, diagnostic procedures (including pathology, clinical pathology and microbiology), surgical technique, practical clinical interventions, case management and disease prevention. Students will be introduced to more complexities related to client communication, conflict management, medical mistakes, and financial literacy. Students will demonstrate continued development in communication, advanced history taking, working with veterinary health care team, making plans, explaining diagnostic options and tools, leadership, and professional skills related to the increasing complexities of the profession.

DVM 6340 Systemic Pathology (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Building upon the foundation of Pathologic Basis of Disease, this course uses a system and species-specific approach to review lesions of common dysfunctions and diseases. Pathogenesis, tissue sampling, sample submission, the value of ancillary diagnostic testing, and communicating post-mortem findings are emphasized. Students learn to formulate and understand all parts of a postmortem report.

DVM 6350 Clinical Pathology (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Students will develop a systematic approach to the evaluation and correct interpretation of routine clinical pathology tests (hematology, biochemistry, urinalysis, cytology, endocrinology). Aided by an understanding of the significance of common changes and underlying physiological principles, student will learn to integrate laboratory results with the patient's clinical presentation. Students will interpret routine lab tests and communicate those results, using appropriate language, and will begin to integrate lab tests appropriately into daily practice. As part of the Clinical and Professional skills courses students will perform basic in-house lab tests and microscopy, including leukocyte differentials, urine sediment examination, and basic cytology.

DVM 6260 Animal Feeding and Nutrition (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Fundamental concepts pertaining to nutrition and metabolism of macronutrients and micronutrients and sources of nutrients and energy for production and companion animals. Key comparative differences in nutrition and metabolism between ruminants and herbivorous, omnivorous, and carnivorous monogastrics will be highlighted. Core concepts pertaining to nutritional requirements, feeding regimes, and feed formulations will be discussed. Feeds and ingredients used in animal diets are examined and approaches to feeding animals are discussed. The basic principle of feeding to maintain health and production, determining nutritional content of feed and diet, and the challenges of feeding in the current social, political and environmental climates will be explored. Topics surrounding mainstream production animal systems, including beef, dairy, poultry, and swine, will be emphasized. Pet foods and feeding will also be explored.

DVM 6170 Principles of One Health (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hour lab). Concepts of One Health, built on the foundation of biomedical research, zoonotic diseases, ecosystem health, and public health will be explored to understand how ecological, social, human-animal interactions, and pathological variables affect the health status of animal and human populations and the environment. The course will explore the collaboration and interaction between professional communities in the One Health paradigm and the impact of laws, policies, and management decisions on the health of animals, humans, and ecosystems. Effective tools to encourage inter-professional and inter-sectorial dialogue and collaboration will be discussed.

DVM 6380 Pharmacology and Toxicology (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course provides the student with the knowledge and understanding required to use drugs effectively and safely in veterinary medicine. The mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects, and clinical use of the major classes of drugs used in veterinary medicine will be covered. The common and regionally relevant toxicants, including chemical, food and plant agents, will be explored, with an emphasis on mechanism of action, toxic principles, and sources.

DVM 6290 Introduction to Health Management (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course covers advanced epidemiological concepts useful for the practice of veterinary medicine. Important concepts include appropriate use and choice of diagnostic tests in individual animal and population settings, developing a structured approach towards investigating disease outbreaks, exploring alternative strategies for treating and controlling disease, and evaluating whether treatment strategies are effective.

Year 2, Semester 4 Course Descriptions

DVM 6241 Public Health & Food Safety (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). The role of animals as sources of public health hazards and as sentinels for environmental health risk factors will be examined in this course. Students will apply systems thinking to identify how zoonotic diseases and food safety hazards emerge, spread and can be controlled. Public health methods and tools related to veterinary issues will be applied to identify options and methods for the prevention and control of hazards and reduction of health risks.

DVM 6251 Introduction to Diagnostic Imaging (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course introduces the student to the basic principles and uses of common diagnostic imaging modalities. The theoretical basis behind each imaging technology, the acquisition of quality images, and the ability to interpret and describe normal and abnormal findings will be emphasized. Instruction is included in the necessary control measures for working safely with diagnostic imaging equipment.

DVM 6361 Principles of Anesthesia (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). A comprehensive introduction to general principles of veterinary anesthesiology across species. The course provides students with a foundation in the basic principles to provide a foundational knowledge and reasoning base that will support learning in the clinical presentation, clinical skills, and advanced medicine and surgery courses.

DVM 6311 Clinical and Professional Skills IIb (3 credits, 1 hour lecture, 7 hours lab). Building on Clinical and Professional Skills courses, students will continue to expand their clinical skills in clinical examination of relevant body systems, diagnostic procedures (including pathology, clinical pathology and microbiology), surgical technique, practical clinical interventions, case management and disease prevention. Students will perform a mock surgery using a clinical skills model, perform a leak test on their anesthesia machine, and learn proper technique for surgical hand preparation. Students will be introduced to more complexities related to client communication, conflict management, medical mistakes and financial literacy. Students will demonstrate continued development in communication, leadership, breaking bad news, working with challenging clients, money conversations, and professional skills related to the increasing complexities of the profession.

DVM 6321 Clinical Presentations IIb (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). A problem-based course where students will develop their problem- solving, diagnostic reasoning, and clinical decision-making skills by exploring a series of clinical presentations. Presentations will cover clinical problems, health protection problems, public health/public practice and research problems. Skills will include problem identification, information gathering and assessment, clinical reasoning and problem solving. Students are expected to integrate foundational knowledge from biomedical sciences with clinical sciences, population health science and technical skills to explore and resolve problems. The focus in CPII is on problem assessment, diagnostic reasoning skills and establishment of differential diagnoses. This will include developing schemata and differential diagnoses lists, making decisions about using appropriate diagnostic tests, and interpreting and integrating data from those tests, and using foundational knowledge from discipline courses to diagnose common clinical presentations. Students are introduced to clinical decision-making.

DVM 6131 Theriogenology Principles (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). This course provides foundational knowledge and introduces estrous cycles, and breeding management of economically important livestock species, horses, and companion animals. Students will understand the economic implications of reproductive efficiency in various species.

DVM 6271 Principles of Surgery (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). A comprehensive introduction to general principles of veterinary surgery across species is covered in this course. Students will gain a foundation in the basic principles to provide a foundational knowledge and reasoning base that will support learning in the clinical presentation, clinical skills, and advanced medicine and surgery courses.

DVM 6281 Small Animal Medicine and Surgery (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course prepares the student for small animal practice by providing the foundational knowledge needed for diagnosing and treating the most common diseases and surgical conditions encountered in cats, dogs, and common exotic animals. Principles of emergency medicine will be discussed.

DVM 6191 Food Animal Medicine and Surgery (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). This course prepares the student for food animal practice by providing the foundational knowledge needed for diagnosing and treating the most common diseases and surgical conditions encountered in food animal and related species.

DVM 6101 Equine Medicine and Surgery (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). Prepares the student for equine practice by providing the foundational knowledge needed for diagnosing and treating the most common diseases and surgical conditions encountered in horses and related species.

Year 3, Semester 5 Course Descriptions

DVM 7200 Outbreak Investigation and Disaster Response (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Students will build upon the framework for investigating outbreaks of disease developed in epidemiology. They will do this by investigating a series of simulated outbreaks, applying steps to determine whether an outbreak exists, establishing a case definition, describing the epidemiology of the disease, generating and testing hypotheses, and communicating their findings to appropriate parties. Further, the students explore the patterns of behavior that people display relative to their animals during disasters. The students explore the role of veterinarians in disaster management and develop plans for disaster response should a disaster fall on a veterinary practice.

DVM 7220 Clinical Presentations IIIa (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). A problem-based course where students will develop their problem- solving, diagnostic reasoning, and clinical decision-making skills by exploring a series of clinical presentations. Presentations will cover clinical problems, health protection problems, public health/public practice and research problems. Skills will include problem identification, information gathering and assessment, clinical reasoning and problem solving. Students are expected to integrate foundational knowledge from biomedical sciences with clinical sciences, population health science and technical skills to explore and resolve problems. The focus in CP III is on clinical-decision making, including interventions and prognostication. Students synthesize comprehensive treatment or health management plans that take into account therapeutic approaches, outcomes, feasibility, economics, client expectations, compliance, public health, regulations and the environment.

DVM 7310 Clinical and Professional Skills IIIa (3 credits, 1 hour lecture, 7 hours lab). Building on Clinical and Professional Skills I and II, students gain experience in clinical evaluations, routine anesthesia, and surgery. Students will perform their first live animal surgery, serve as anesthesiologist, and serve as assistant surgeon. Diagnostic and therapeutic skills, therapeutic interventions, record keeping, case management, and disease prevention knowledge and skills are further developed. Students will be introduced to more complexities related to client communication, conflict management, financial literacy, veterinary team dynamics and engagement, euthanasia conversations, and medical ethics. Students will demonstrate continued development in communication, leadership, and professional skills related to the increasing complexities of the profession.

DVM 7160 Anesthesia and Analgesia Applications (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). Introduces the student to the principals and practice of veterinary anesthesiology and analgesia in commonly encountered large, small, and exotic animal species. It will focus on local and general anesthesia for low risk animals, with an overall goal of reducing the risk of mortality. Students' knowledge of analgesia and basic critical care will be enhanced.

DVM 7390 Food Animal Medicine and Surgery (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Building on the previous semester, this course prepares the student for production animal practice by providing the foundational knowledge needed for diagnosing and treating the most common diseases and surgical conditions encountered in cattle, small ruminants, camelids, poultry and swine health.

DVM 7300 Equine Medicine and Surgery (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Building on the previous semester, this course prepares the student for equine practice by providing the foundational knowledge needed for diagnosing and treating the most common diseases and surgical conditions encountered in horses and related species.

DVM 7480 Small Animal Medicine and Surgery (4 credits, 4 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Building on the previous semester, this course prepares the student for small animal practice by providing the foundational knowledge needed for diagnosing and treating the most common diseases and surgical conditions encountered in cats, dogs, and common exotic animals. Principles of emergency medicine will be discussed.

DVM 7130 Theriogenology (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). This course provides foundational knowledge and develops clinical competence in managing the reproductive health of economically important livestock species, horses, and companion animals. Reproductive diseases and pathologies will be discussed. Students will integrate knowledge from various disciplines to diagnose and manage clinical issues pertaining to the reproductive health of animals on an individual-animal or herd basis.

DVM 7140 Business and Workforce Preparation (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). This course introduces students to the personal and business financial skills necessary for a successful career. Models of business practice employed in veterinary medicine will be discussed. Strategies for successfully applying for employment, managing the challenges of entering the workforce, and the principles of clinic management will be discussed. The principles of self- management introduced in year one will be reviewed, particularly as they apply to the fourth year and first years after graduation.

DVM 7150 Small Animal Dentistry (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). The diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of dental diseases of the dog, cat, and exotic pets will be discussed. Students will draw upon foundational knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and radiology to integrate and apply the knowledge they gain in lecture to clinical situations they may encounter in general veterinary practice, and to prepare them for future clinical training.

DVM 7170 Elective Production Animal Health (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab).
DVM 7172 Elective One Health (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab).
DVM 7174 Elective Equine Health (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab).
DVM 7176 Elective Academic and Industry (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab).
DVM 7178 Elective General Veterinary Practice (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab).

Year 3, Semester 6 Course Descriptions

DVM 7321 Clinical Presentations IIIb (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). A problem-based course where students will develop their problem- solving, diagnostic reasoning, and clinical decision-making skills by exploring a series of clinical presentations. Presentations will cover clinical problems, health protection problems, public health/public practice and research problems. Skills will include problem identification, information gathering and assessment, clinical reasoning and problem solving. Students are expected to integrate foundational knowledge from biomedical sciences with clinical sciences, population health science and technical skills to explore and resolve problems. The focus in CP III is on clinical-decision making, including interventions and prognostication. Students synthesize comprehensive treatment or health management plans that take into account therapeutic approaches, outcomes, feasibility, economics, client expectations, compliance, public health, regulations and the environment.

DVM 7311 Clinical and Professional Skills IIIb (3 credits, 1 hour lecture, 7 hours lab). Building on Clinical and Professional Skills I and II, students gain experience in clinical evaluations, routine anesthesia and surgery. Students will perform a number of live-animal surgeries and serve as anesthesiologist on a number of cases. Diagnostic and therapeutic skills, therapeutic interventions, record keeping, case management, and disease prevention knowledge and skills are further developed. Students will work with more complexities related to client communication, conflict management, financial literacy, veterinary team dynamics and engagement, euthanasia conversations, working with professional organizations, veterinary practice acts, legal responsibilities, malpractice protection, and medical ethics. Students will demonstrate continued development in communication, leadership, and professional skills related to the increasing complexities of the profession.

DVM 7231 Therapeutics (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Introduction to the principals and practice of veterinary therapeutics in production, companion, and exotic animals, and the practical application of clinical pharmacology. Key areas covered include drug selection, clinical pharmacokinetics and drug dosing, antimicrobial decision-making and stewardship, adverse effects, and fluid therapy.

DVM 7241 Production Advanced Health Management and Prevention Medicine (2 credits, 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). This course provides an overview of the principles of population health and of production management for beef cattle, dairy cattle, small ruminants, swine, and poultry. Includes the application of scientific principles to practical herd management with components of reproduction, nutrition, housing, genetics, economics, records, food safety, and disease control (vaccination). Students will learn analytic techniques and computer software skills to evaluate population disease and production problems to improve the health and production of livestock and other species.

DVM 7151 Regulatory Veterinary Medicine (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). The principles of regulatory veterinary medicine will be discussed, and students will be prepared to achieve USDA Accreditation.

DVM 7381 Small Animal Medicine and Surgery (3 credits, 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab). Building on the previous semester, this course prepares the student for small animal practice by providing the foundational knowledge needed for diagnosing and treating the most common diseases and surgical conditions encountered in cats, dogs, and common exotic animals. Principles of emergency medicine will be discussed.

DVM 7101 Equine Medicine and Surgery (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). Building on the previous semester, this course prepares the student for equine practice by providing the foundational knowledge needed for diagnosing and treating the most common diseases and surgical conditions encountered in horses and related species.

DVM 7191 Food Animal Medicine and Surgery (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). Building on the previous semester, this course prepares the student for production animal practice by providing the foundational knowledge needed for diagnosing and treating the most common diseases and surgical conditions encountered in cattle, small ruminants, camelids, poultry and swine health.

DVM 7161 Avian and Exotic Medicine and Surgery (1 credit, 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab). This course will build confidence, competence, and commitment to the species of small, “exotic”, mammalian, avian, and reptilian species that are most commonly presented to clinicians in North American practices. The representative species discussed and studied in this basic medicine course will enable the veterinary student to gain a basic understanding of the unique challenges and requirements of these increasingly popular, companion animals. This “Avian & Exotics” (A&E) course will build on the knowledge & skills the veterinary student has developed over the previous semesters. This A & E course will require a sound knowledge of parasitology, anatomy, physiology, general pathology, immunology, infectious diseases, and other disciplines of medicine and surgery. The veterinary student will be expected to be able to adapt and modify their skill sets and knowledge base to adapt to the unique characteristics of these species of other taxa of the vertebrate phylum.

DVM 7471 Elective Production Animal Health (4 credits, 4 hours lecture, 0 hours lab).
DVM 7473 Elective One Health (4 credits, 4 hours lecture, 0 hours lab).
DVM 7475 Elective Equine Health (4 credits, 4 hours lecture, 0 hours lab).
DVM 7477 Elective Academic and Industry (4 credits, 4 hours lecture, 0 hours lab).
DVM 7479 Elective General Veterinary Practice (4 credits, 4 hours lecture, 0 hours lab).

Year 4 Core Course Descriptions

DVM 8480 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery (4-week block; 4 credits). Consists of supervised clinical instruction in a selected, pre-approved, high quality practice, focusing on small animal species; primarily canine and feline. Students will see a wide variety of medical and surgical cases and are active participants in their diagnostic and therapeutic management, to include; preventative care, dentistry, medical case work up and management, and clinical surgical procedures. Students are involved in the preparation and management of medical cases and surgeries along with follow up and client interaction under the supervision of veterinarians and staff and have access to subject matter expertise. Students are also active in comprehensive medical recordkeeping and retrieval in formats specific to the practice. Prerequisite: successful completion of pre-clinical course work, clinical year standing.

DVM 8400 Equine Medicine and Surgery (4-week block; 4 credits). Consists of supervised clinical instruction in a selected, pre-approved, high quality practice, focusing on equine. Students will see a wide variety of equine cases in the clinic and ambulatory format and will be active participants in their diagnostic and therapeutic management, to include; preventative care, dentistry, medical case workup and management, emergency, sports medicine, and clinical and field surgical procedures. Students are involved in the preparation and management of medical cases and surgeries along with follow up and client interaction under the supervision of veterinarians and staff and have access to subject matter expertise. Students are also active in comprehensive medical recordkeeping and retrieval in formats specific to the practice. Prerequisite: successful completion of pre-clinical course work, clinical year standing.

DVM 8490 Food Animal Medicine and Surgery (4-week block; 4 credits). Consists of supervised clinical instruction in a selected, pre-approved, high quality practice, focusing on food animal species, primarily beef and dairy cattle. Students will see a variety of food animal cases in the clinic, in the field and in consultative settings. Areas of diagnostic and therapeutic management to include; herd health evaluation & management including reproduction, population health evaluation, treatment and problem-solving strategies, emergency case management, and individual case medical and surgical management. Students are involved in the work-up, assessment, and recommendations in the consultative setting and are involved in the preparation and management of medical and surgical cases in individualized patient settings; along with follow up and client interaction under the supervision of veterinarians and staff. Students will have access to subject matter expertise and are also active in comprehensive medical recordkeeping and retrieval in formats specific to the practice. Prerequisite: successful completion of pre-clinical course work, clinical year standing.

DVM 8250 Diagnostic Pathology (2-week block; 2 credits). Consists of a combination of in-house, state diagnostic, and outside reference laboratories along with in-field clinical instruction by subject-matter experts in necropsy of various vertebrate animal species with emphasis on domesticated animals. There will be application of diagnostic procedures and techniques in anatomic and clinical pathology; case-based, problem-oriented approaches to diagnostic problem solving utilizing current SVM teaching labs and referral cases and prepared materials that illustrate the aspects of disease mechanisms, pathogenesis, tissue changes, and factors needed for accurate diagnoses. Students will learn concepts, pathogenesis, and gross, microscopic, and ultrastructural changes associated with general pathology: cell injury and death, tissue mineralization, tissue pigmentation, disturbances of tissue growth, disturbances of circulation, and inflammation; recognition of gross, microscopic, and ultrastructural tissue changes and pathogenesis. Prerequisite: successful completion of pre-clinical course work, clinical year standing.

DVM 8151 Diagnostic Imaging (1-week block; 1 credit). Consists of supervised clinical instruction in a selected, pre-approved, high quality diagnostic imaging facility, approved radiology course programming, or SVM faculty moderated diagnostic imaging training. Within the context of the diagnostic imaging facility, students will be supervised by subject matter experts in diagnostic imaging as a variety of cases are evaluated. This will include, Digital X-ray, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Ultrasound, CT, MRI, and Nuclear Scintigraphy. Animal species will be both large (primarily equine), and small animal. The diagnostic imaging clinical affiliate facility houses 4 boarded radiologists. Prerequisite: successful completion of pre-clinical course work, clinical year standing.

DVM 8161 Anesthesiology (1-week block; 1 credit). Consists of supervised clinical instruction in a selected, pre-approved, anesthesia emphasized facility, or SVM faculty moderated anesthesia training. Our diagnostic imaging clinical affiliate houses a boarded anesthesiologist and will deliver anesthesia training on imaging subjects. Other anesthesia emphasized facilities may be used to deliver anesthesia training supervised by SVM faculty or subject matter experts. Students will learn proper anesthesia protocols on clinically normal and medically compromised patients. Prerequisite: successful completion of pre-clinical course work, clinical year standing.

DVM 8210 Clinical Assessment and NAVLE (7 weeks; 2 credits). Required Course where reasoning and assessment is offered three times during the clinical year; once in the fall semester, once in the spring semester and a final year assessment, (after rotations are completed and prior to commencement). Students will return to the TTU-SVM campus for a debriefing and assessment of their clinical year experiences and will be assessed on learned clinical skills and professional development. Fall and spring assessment periods will have students participating in grand rounds, providing feedback on programmatic improvement and participating in remediation, if necessary. The NAVLE Administration (4 weeks) will occur in this course during the fall. Students will prepare and sit for the North American Veterinary Licensing Exam (NAVLE®). Students will conduct independent studies and review in order to prepare for the NAVLE® by completing ~80% of an approved NAVLE prep course. Students will take the NAVLE® at the location that they applied for during the summer June-August application window. Students will return for a final assessment week and will share clinical year experiences with peers and faculty. Responsibilities during this week will include; completing various surveys, addressing financial aid separation, debt repayment methods and commencement celebration. Prerequisite: successful completion of pre-clinical course work, clinical year standing.

Year 4 Core Course Descriptions

DVM 8491 Rural or Regional Practice Selective (4 weeks, 4 credits).
DVM 8482 Required Selective (4 weeks, 4 credits).
DVM 8282 Required Selective (2 weeks, 2 credits).

DVM 8462 Designated Selective (4 weeks, 4 credits).
DVM 8262 Designated Selective (2 weeks, 2 credits).
DVM 8442 Open Selective (4 weeks, 4 credits).
DVM 8242 Open Selective (2 weeks, 2 credits).

School of Veterinary Medicine